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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Resolving confusions about urges and intentions.
Cogn Neurosci
PUBLISHED: 09-01-2011
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In our article we considered the nature and the functional anatomy of "urges-for-action," both in the context of everyday behaviors such as yawning, swallowing, and micturition, and in relation to clinical disorders in which the urge-for-action is considered pathological (e.g., Tourette syndrome), and we argued for a key role for the insular and cingulate cortices in experiencing the urge-for-action. Here we seek to address some of the key points raised within several of the interesting commentaries on, and challenges to, our paper.
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On the functional anatomy of the urge-for-action.
Cogn Neurosci
PUBLISHED: 07-27-2011
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Several common neuropsychiatric disorders (e.g., obsessive-compulsive disorder, Tourette syndrome (TS), autistic spectrum disorder) are associated with unpleasant bodily sensations that are perceived as an urge for action. Similarly, many of our everyday behaviors are also characterized by bodily sensations that we experience as urges for action. Where do these urges originate? In this paper, we consider the nature and the functional anatomy of "urges-for-action," both in the context of everyday behaviors such as yawning, swallowing, and micturition, and in relation to clinical disorders in which the urge-for-action is considered pathological and substantially interferes with activities of daily living (e.g., TS). We review previous frameworks for thinking about behavioral urges and demonstrate that there is considerable overlap between the functional anatomy of urges associated with everyday behaviors such as swallowing, yawning, and micturition, and those urges associated with the generation of tics in TS. Specifically, we show that the limbic sensory and motor regions-insula and mid-cingulate cortex-are common to all of these behaviors, and we argue that this "motivation-for-action" network should be considered distinct from an "intentional action" network, associated with regions of premotor and parietal cortex, which may be responsible for the perception of "willed intention" during the execution of goal-directed actions.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.