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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Improving nutritional care: innovation and good practice.
J Adv Nurs
PUBLISHED: 10-02-2014
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This paper presents examples of good practice in nutritional screening and care and identifies methods used to overcome contextual constraints and discusses the implications for nursing practice in hospitals.
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Influences on adherence to diet and physical activity recommendations in women and children: insights from six European studies.
Ann. Nutr. Metab.
PUBLISHED: 10-02-2014
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Across Europe, poor health behaviours are associated with increased risks of non-communicable diseases. There is particular concern about young women, children and families, not least as health behaviours operating before and during pregnancy and in early postnatal life may have profound long-term consequences for children's health. Using findings drawn from 7 European countries, we aimed to identify barriers to the implementation and uptake of dietary and physical activity recommendations, and to consider how best to achieve changes in mothers' behaviours and thereby improve the adoption of health recommendations. Six studies across the 7 countries were used for this narrative synthesis of findings. Key Messages: A woman's education has a strong influence on her own and her children's health behaviours. Women's diets vary across ethnic groups and according to number of children, but psychological factors, such as self-efficacy and sense of control, which may be amenable to modification, are powerful, too, particularly in women with lower educational attainment. Maternal influences on children's behaviours are strong. Differences exist in infant feeding across countries, and there are apparent urban/rural differences in children's diets and physical activity.
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The effect of a behaviour change intervention on the diets and physical activity levels of women attending Sure Start Children's Centres: results from a complex public health intervention.
BMJ Open
PUBLISHED: 07-18-2014
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The UK government's response to the obesity epidemic calls for action in communities to improve people's health behaviour. This study evaluated the effects of a community intervention on dietary quality and levels of physical activity of women from disadvantaged backgrounds.
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The role of the speech-language pathologist in home care.
Home Healthc Nurse
PUBLISHED: 06-03-2014
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Speech language pathologists play an important role in the care of patients with speech, language, or swallowing difficulties that can result from a variety of medical conditions. This article describes how speech language pathologists assess and treat these conditions and the red flags that suggest a referral to a speech language pathologist is indicated.
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'Making every contact count': Evaluation of the impact of an intervention to train health and social care practitioners in skills to support health behaviour change.
J Health Psychol
PUBLISHED: 04-10-2014
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A total of 148 health and social care practitioners were trained in skills to support behaviour change: creating opportunities to discuss health behaviours, using open discovery questions, listening, reflecting and goal-setting. At three time points post-training, use of the skills was evaluated and compared with use of skills by untrained practitioners. Trained practitioners demonstrated significantly greater use of these client-centred skills to support behaviour change compared to their untrained peers up to 1 year post-training. Because it uses existing services to deliver support for behaviour change, this training intervention has the potential to improve public health at relatively low cost.
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A mixed-methods investigation to explore how women living in disadvantaged areas might be supported to improve their diets.
J Health Psychol
PUBLISHED: 11-01-2011
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Mixed-methods explored the potential for using Sure Start Childrens Centres (SSCCs) to deliver an intervention to improve the diets of disadvantaged women and their children. In an expert discussion, SSCC staff described gaining womens trust, meeting needs and bringing about change as key to engaging women successfully. Structured observations in SSCCs showed they host activities in an environment conducive to building relationships and meeting womens needs. However, staff often missed opportunities to support women to make dietary changes. These data suggest that an intervention to help staff make the most of these opportunities would have the best chance of success.
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Does living in a food insecure household impact on the diets and body composition of young children? Findings from the Southampton Womens Survey.
J Epidemiol Community Health
PUBLISHED: 06-07-2011
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Little is known about food insecurity in the UK. The aims of this study were to assess the prevalence and factors associated with food insecurity in a UK cohort and to examine whether the diets, reported health and anthropometry of young food insecure children differed from those of other children.
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Effectiveness of community- and workplace-based interventions to manage musculoskeletal-related sickness absence and job loss: a systematic review.
Rheumatology (Oxford)
PUBLISHED: 03-16-2011
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To assess the effectiveness of interventions in community and workplace settings to reduce sickness absence and job loss in workers with musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs).
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Impact of mothers negative affectivity, parental locus of control and child-feeding practices on dietary patterns of 3-year-old children: the MoBa Cohort Study.
Matern Child Nutr
PUBLISHED: 08-25-2010
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The aims of the current study were to (1) identify dietary patterns in 3-year-old children; (2) investigate the extent to which negative affectivity, external parental locus of control and control-oriented child-feeding practices (pressure to eat and restriction) relate to these dietary patterns; and (3) to examine to what extent external parental locus of control and control-oriented child-feeding practices serve as mediators for these effects. This study was part of the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study, comprising 14,122 mothers completing assessments at 6 months, 18 months and 3 years post-partum. Factor analysis of the childrens diet identified two weakly correlated dietary patterns, labeled unhealthy and wholesome. Mothers high in negative affectivity perceived they had little control over their childs behaviour, which in turn was associated with both pressuring their child to eat and restricting the childs food intake and a less wholesome and a more unhealthy diet in the child. Pressuring the child to eat was independently associated with a less wholesome and a more unhealthy diet. Restricting the childs diet was associated with a more wholesome and a less unhealthy diet. These findings held after controlling for maternal smoking, education, age, body mass index, marital status, homemaker status and child gender.
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The Southampton Initiative for Health: a complex intervention to improve the diets and increase the physical activity levels of women from disadvantaged communities.
J Health Psychol
PUBLISHED: 08-13-2010
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The Southampton Initiative for Health is a training intervention with Sure Start Childrens Centre staff designed to improve the diets and physical activity levels of women of childbearing age. Training aims to help staff to support women in making changes to their lifestyles by improving three skills: reflection on current practice; asking open discovery questions; and goal-setting. The impact of the training on staff practice is being assessed. A before and after non-randomized controlled trial is being used to evaluate the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of the intervention in improving womens diets and increasing their physical activity levels.
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Specific psychological variables predict quality of diet in women of lower, but not higher, educational attainment.
Appetite
PUBLISHED: 06-11-2010
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Our previous work found that perceived control over life was a significant predictor of the quality of diet of women of lower educational attainment. In this paper, we explore the influence on quality of diet of a range of psychological and social factors identified during focus group discussions, and specify the way this differs in women of lower and higher educational attainment. We assessed educational attainment, quality of diet, and psycho-social factors in 378 women attending Sure Start Childrens Centres and baby clinics in Southampton, UK. Multiple-group path analysis showed that in women of lower educational attainment, the effect of general self-efficacy on quality of diet was mediated through perceptions of control and through food involvement, but that there were also direct effects of social support for healthy eating and having positive outcome expectancies. There was no effect of self-efficacy, perceived control or outcome expectancies on the quality of diet of women of higher educational attainment, though having more social support and food involvement were associated with improved quality of diet in these women. Our analysis confirms our hypothesis that control-related factors are more important in determining dietary quality in women of lower educational attainment than in women of higher educational attainment.
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Does teamwork improve performance in the operating room? A multilevel evaluation.
Jt Comm J Qual Patient Saf
PUBLISHED: 03-19-2010
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Medical care is a team effort, especially as patient cases are more complex. Communication, cooperation, and coordination are vital to effective care, especially in complex service lines such as the operating room (OR). Team training, specifically the TeamSTEPPS training program, has been touted as one methodology for optimizing teamwork among providers and increasing patient safety. Although such team-training programs have transformed the culture and outcomes of other dynamic, high-risk industries such as aviation and nuclear power, evidence of team training effectiveness in health care is still evolving. Although providers tend to react positively to many training programs, evidence that training contributes to important behavioral and patient safety outcomes is lacking.
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Why women of lower educational attainment struggle to make healthier food choices: the importance of psychological and social factors.
Psychol Health
PUBLISHED: 10-29-2009
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Women of lower educational attainment are more likely to eat unhealthy diets than women of higher educational attainment. To identify influences on the food choices of women with lower educational attainment, 11 focus groups (eight with women of lower, and three with women of higher educational attainment) were held. Using a semi-structured discussion guide, environmental, social, historical and psychological factors known to be associated with food choice were explored. Audio recordings were transcribed verbatim and thematically analysed. Compared to women of higher educational attainment, women of lower educational attainment had less control over their families food choices, less support for attempts to eat healthily, fewer opportunities to observe and learn good food-related practices, more negative affect, more perceived environmental constraints and more ambiguous beliefs about the consequences of eating a nutritious diet. These findings provide a starting point for taking forward the design of an intervention to improve the diets of young women.
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A social marketing approach to improving the nutrition of low-income women and children: an initial focus group study.
Public Health Nutr
PUBLISHED: 02-16-2009
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To identify approaches for interventions to improve the nutrition of low-income women and children.
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Educational attainment, perceived control and the quality of womens diets.
Appetite
PUBLISHED: 01-28-2009
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Data from the Southampton Womens Survey have established that women of lower educational attainment have poorer quality diets than those of higher educational attainment. This relationship is strong and graded such that for every increase in level of educational qualification, there is an increase in the likelihood that a woman will have a better quality diet. It is not wholly explained by socio-economic status. Qualitative research carried out in Southampton suggests that women of lower educational attainment may have a poorer diet because they feel they lack control over the food choices they make for themselves and their families. We set out to investigate the relationship between educational attainment, perceived control and quality of diet in a sample of women from Southampton.
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Variety and quality of healthy foods differ according to neighbourhood deprivation.
Health Place
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This study addresses a gap in the food environment literature by investigating spatial differences in the inter relationship of price, variety and quality of food in southern England. We conducted a survey of all grocery stores (n=195) in the city of Southampton, UK, and ranked neighbourhoods according to national quintiles of deprivation. We found no difference in availability or cheapest price across neighbourhoods. However, the poorest neighbourhoods had less variety of healthy products and poorer quality fruit and vegetables than more affluent neighbourhoods. Dietary inequalities may be exacerbated by differences in the variety and quality of healthy foods sold locally; these factors may influence whether or not consumers purchase healthy foods.
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Healthy conversation skills: increasing competence and confidence in front-line staff.
Public Health Nutr
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OBJECTIVE: (i) To assess change in confidence in having conversations that support parents with healthy eating and physical activity post-training. (ii) To assess change in staff competence in using open discovery questions (those generally beginning with how and what that help individuals reflect and identify barriers and solutions) post-training. (iii) To examine the relationship between confidence and competence post-training. DESIGN: A pre-post evaluation of Healthy Conversation Skills, a staff training intervention. SETTING: Sure Start Childrens Centres in Southampton, England. SUBJECTS: A total of 145 staff working in Sure Start Childrens Centres completed the training, including play workers (43 %) and community development or family support workers (35 %). RESULTS: We observed an increase in median confidence rating for having conversations about healthy eating and physical activity (both P < 0·001), and in using open discovery questions (P < 0·001), after staff attended the Healthy Conversation Skills training. We also found a positive relationship between the use of open discovery questions and confidence in having conversations about healthy eating post-training (r = 0·21, P = 0·01), but a non-significant trend was observed for having conversations about physical activity (r = 0·15, P = 0·06). CONCLUSIONS: The Healthy Conversation Skills training proved effective at increasing the confidence of staff working at Sure Start Childrens Centres to have more productive conversations with parents about healthy eating. Wider implementation of these skills may be a useful public health nutrition capacity building strategy to help community workers support families with young children to eat more healthy foods.
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Implementation of new Healthy Conversation Skills to support lifestyle changes - what helps and what hinders? Experiences of Sure Start Childrens Centre staff.
Health Soc Care Community
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Effective communication is necessary for good relationships between healthcare practitioners and clients. This study examined barriers and facilitators to implementing new communication skills. One hundred and ten Sure Start Childrens Centre staff attended one of 13 follow-up workshops in Southampton, UK between May 2009 and February 2011 to reflect on the use of new skills following a training course in communication, reflection and problem-solving. Barriers and facilitators were assessed with an adapted Problematic Experiences of Therapy scale (PETS). Staff reported frequency of skill use, and described what made it more difficult or easier to use the skills. Complete data were available for 101 trainees. The PETS indicated that staff had confidence in using the skills, but felt that there were practical barriers to using them, such as lack of time. Skills were used less often when staff perceived parents not to be engaging with them (Spearmans correlation r(s) = -0.42, P < 0.001), when staff felt less confident to use the skills (r(s) = -0.37, P < 0.001) and when there were more practical barriers (r(s) = -0.37, P < 0.001). In support of findings from the PETS, content analysis of free text responses suggested that the main barrier was a perceived lack of time to implement new skills. Facilitators included seeing the benefits of using the skills, finding opportunities and having good relationships with parents. Understanding the range of barriers and facilitators to implementation is essential when developing training to facilitate ongoing support and sustain skill use. Special attention should be given to exploring trainees perceptions of time, to be able to address this significant barrier to skill implementation. Staff training requires a multi-faceted approach to address the range of perceived barriers.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.