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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Long-Range Stabilization of Anthrax Protective Antigen upon Binding to CMG2.
Biochemistry
PUBLISHED: 09-15-2014
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Protective antigen (PA) mediates entry of edema factor (EF) and lethal factor (LF) into the cytoplasmic space of the cells through the formation of a membrane-spanning pore. To do this, PA must initially bind to a host cellular receptor. Recent mass spectrometry analysis of PA using histidine hydrogen-deuterium exchange (His-HDX) has shown that binding of the von Willebrand factor A (vWA) domain of the receptor capillary morphogenesis protein-2 (CMG2) lowers the exchange rates of the imidazole C2 hydrogen of several histidines, suggesting that receptor binding decreases the structural flexibility of PA. Here, using His-HDX and fluorescence as a function of denaturant, and protease susceptibility, we show that binding of the vWA domain of CMG2 largely increases the stability of PA and the effect reaches up to 70 Å from the receptor binding interface. We also show that the pKa values and HDX rates of histidines located in separate domains change upon receptor binding. These results indicate that when one end of the protein is anchored, the structure of PA is tightened, noncovalent interactions are strengthened, and the global stability of the protein increases. These findings suggest that CMG2 may be used to stabilize PA in future anthrax vaccines.
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O18Quant: a semiautomatic strategy for quantitative analysis of high-resolution 16O/18O labeled data.
Biomed Res Int
PUBLISHED: 02-28-2014
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Proteolytic (18)O-labeling has been widely used in quantitative proteomics since it can uniformly label all peptides from different kinds of proteins. There have been multiple algorithms and tools developed over the last few years to analyze high-resolution proteolytic (16)O/(18)O labeled mass spectra. We have developed a software package, O18Quant, which addresses two major issues in the previously developed algorithms. First, O18Quant uses a robust linear model (RLM) for peptide-to-protein ratio estimation. RLM can minimize the effect of outliers instead of iteratively removing them which is a common practice in other approaches. Second, the existing algorithms lack applicable implementation. We address this by implementing O18Quant using C# under Microsoft.net framework and R. O18Quant automatically calculates the peptide/protein relative ratio and provides a friendly graphical user interface (GUI) which allows the user to manually validate the quantification results at scan, peptide, and protein levels. The intuitive GUI of O18Quant can greatly enhance the user's visualization and understanding of the data analysis. O18Quant can be downloaded for free as part of the software suite ProteomicsTools.
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Conformational flexibility in the catalytic triad revealed by the high-resolution crystal structure of Streptomyces erythraeus trypsin in an unliganded state.
Acta Crystallogr. D Biol. Crystallogr.
PUBLISHED: 02-22-2014
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With more than 500 crystal structures determined, serine proteases make up greater than one-third of all proteases structurally examined to date, making them among the best biochemically and structurally characterized enzymes. Despite the numerous crystallographic and biochemical studies of trypsin and related serine proteases, there are still considerable shortcomings in the understanding of their catalytic mechanism. Streptomyces erythraeus trypsin (SET) does not exhibit autolysis and crystallizes readily at physiological pH; hence, it is well suited for structural studies aimed at extending the understanding of the catalytic mechanism of serine proteases. While X-ray crystallographic structures of this enzyme have been reported, no coordinates have ever been made available in the Protein Data Bank. Based on this, and observations on the extreme stability and unique properties of this particular trypsin, it was decided to crystallize it and determine its structure. Here, the first sub-angstrom resolution structure of an unmodified, unliganded trypsin crystallized at physiological pH is reported. Detailed structural analysis reveals the geometry and structural rigidity of the catalytic triad in the unoccupied active site and comparison to related serine proteases provides a context for interpretation of biochemical studies of catalytic mechanism and activity.
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(19)F nuclear magnetic resonance and crystallographic studies of 5-fluorotryptophan-labeled anthrax protective antigen and effects of the receptor on stability.
Biochemistry
PUBLISHED: 01-15-2014
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The anthrax protective antigen (PA) is an 83 kDa protein that is one of three protein components of the anthrax toxin, an AB toxin secreted by Bacillus anthracis. PA is capable of undergoing several structural changes, including oligomerization to either a heptameric or octameric structure called the prepore, and at acidic pH a major conformational change to form a membrane-spanning pore. To follow these structural changes at a residue-specific level, we have conducted initial studies in which we have biosynthetically incorporated 5-fluorotryptophan (5-FTrp) into PA, and we have studied the influence of 5-FTrp labeling on the structural stability of PA and on binding to the host receptor capillary morphogenesis protein 2 (CMG2) using (19)F nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). There are seven tryptophans in PA, but of the four domains in PA, only two contain tryptophans: domain 1 (Trp65, -90, -136, -206, and -226) and domain 2 (Trp346 and -477). Trp346 is of particular interest because of its proximity to the CMG2 binding interface, and because it forms part of the membrane-spanning pore. We show that the (19)F resonance of Trp346 is sensitive to changes in pH, consistent with crystallographic studies, and that receptor binding significantly stabilizes Trp346 to both pH and temperature. In addition, we provide evidence that suggests that resonances from tryptophans distant from the binding interface are also stabilized by the receptor. Our studies highlight the positive impact of receptor binding on protein stability and the use of (19)F NMR in gaining insight into structural changes in a high-molecular weight protein.
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Proteomic profiling and functional characterization of early and late shoulder osteoarthritis.
Arthritis Res. Ther.
PUBLISHED: 10-17-2013
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The development of effective treatments for osteoarthritis (OA) has been hampered by a poor understanding of OA at the cellular and molecular levels. Emerging as a disease of the whole joint, the importance of the biochemical contribution of various tissues, including synovium, bone and articular cartilage, has become increasingly significant. Bathing the entire joint structure, the proteomic analysis of synovial fluid (SF) from osteoarthritic shoulders offers a valuable snapshot of the biologic environment throughout disease progression. The purpose of this study was to identify differentially expressed proteins in early and late shoulder osteoarthritic SF in comparison to healthy SF.
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PRMT5 dimethylates R30 of the p65 subunit to activate NF-?B.
Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A.
PUBLISHED: 07-31-2013
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The ubiquitous inducible transcription factor NF-?B plays central roles in immune and inflammatory responses and in tumorigenesis. Complex posttranslational modifications of the p65 subunit (RelA) are a major aspect of the extremely flexible regulation of NF-?B activity. Although phosphorylation, acetylation, ubiquitination, and lysine methylation of NF-?B have been well described, arginine methylation has not yet been found. We now report that, in response to IL-1?, the p65 subunit of NF-?B is dimethylated on arginine 30 (R30) by protein-arginine methyltransferase 5 (PRMT5). Expression of the R30A and R30K mutants of p65 substantially decreased the ability of NF-?B to bind to ?B elements and to drive gene expression. A model in which dimethyl R30 is placed into the crystal structure of p65 predicts new van der Waals contacts that stabilize intraprotein interactions and indirectly increase the affinity of p65 for DNA. PRMT5 was the only arginine methyltransferase that coprecipitated with p65, and its overexpression increased NF-?B activity, whereas PRMT5 knockdown had the opposite effect. Microarray analysis revealed that ?85% of the NF-?B-inducible genes that are down-regulated by the R30A mutation are similarly down-regulated by knocking PRMT5 down. Many cytokine and chemokine genes are among these, and conditioned media from cells expressing the R30A mutant of p65 had much less NF-?B-inducing activity than media from cells expressing the wild-type protein. PRMT5 is overexpressed in many types of cancer, often to a striking degree, indicating that high levels of this enzyme may promote tumorigenesis, at least in part by facilitating NF-?B-induced gene expression.
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Experimental and computational analysis of the transition state for ribonuclease A-catalyzed RNA 2-O-transphosphorylation.
Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A.
PUBLISHED: 07-22-2013
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Enzymes function by stabilizing reaction transition states; therefore, comparison of the transition states of enzymatic and nonenzymatic model reactions can provide insight into biological catalysis. Catalysis of RNA 2-O-transphosphorylation by ribonuclease A is proposed to involve electrostatic stabilization and acid/base catalysis, although the structure of the rate-limiting transition state is uncertain. Here, we describe coordinated kinetic isotope effect (KIE) analyses, molecular dynamics simulations, and quantum mechanical calculations to model the transition state and mechanism of RNase A. Comparison of the (18)O KIEs on the 2O nucleophile, 5O leaving group, and nonbridging phosphoryl oxygens for RNase A to values observed for hydronium- or hydroxide-catalyzed reactions indicate a late anionic transition state. Molecular dynamics simulations using an anionic phosphorane transition state mimic suggest that H-bonding by protonated His12 and Lys41 stabilizes the transition state by neutralizing the negative charge on the nonbridging phosphoryl oxygens. Quantum mechanical calculations consistent with the experimental KIEs indicate that expulsion of the 5O remains an integral feature of the rate-limiting step both on and off the enzyme. Electrostatic interactions with positively charged amino acid site chains (His12/Lys41), together with proton transfer from His119, render departure of the 5O less advanced compared with the solution reaction and stabilize charge buildup in the transition state. The ability to obtain a chemically detailed description of 2-O-transphosphorylation transition states provides an opportunity to advance our understanding of biological catalysis significantly by determining how the catalytic modes and active site environments of phosphoryl transferases influence transition state structure.
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Oxygen-coupled redox regulation of the skeletal muscle ryanodine receptor/Ca2+ release channel (RyR1): sites and nature of oxidative modification.
J. Biol. Chem.
PUBLISHED: 06-24-2013
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In mammalian skeletal muscle, Ca(2+) release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) through the ryanodine receptor/Ca(2+)-release channel RyR1 can be enhanced by S-oxidation or S-nitrosylation of separate Cys residues, which are allosterically linked. S-Oxidation of RyR1 is coupled to muscle oxygen tension (pO2) through O2-dependent production of hydrogen peroxide by SR-resident NADPH oxidase 4. In isolated SR (SR vesicles), an average of six to eight Cys thiols/RyR1 monomer are reversibly oxidized at high (21% O2) versus low pO2 (1% O2), but their identity among the 100 Cys residues/RyR1 monomer is unknown. Here we use isotope-coded affinity tag labeling and mass spectrometry (yielding 93% coverage of RyR1 Cys residues) to identify 13 Cys residues subject to pO2-coupled S-oxidation in SR vesicles. Eight additional Cys residues are oxidized at high versus low pO2 only when NADPH levels are supplemented to enhance NADPH oxidase 4 activity. pO2-sensitive Cys residues were largely non-overlapping with those identified previously as hyperreactive by administration of exogenous reagents (three of 21) or as S-nitrosylated. Cys residues subject to pO2-coupled oxidation are distributed widely within the cytoplasmic domain of RyR1 in multiple functional domains implicated in RyR1 activity-regulating interactions with the L-type Ca(2+) channel (dihydropyridine receptor) and FK506-binding protein 12 as well as in "hot spot" regions containing sites of mutation implicated in malignant hyperthermia and central core disease. pO2-coupled disulfide formation was identified, whereas neither S-glutathionylated nor sulfenamide-modified Cys residues were observed. Thus, physiological redox regulation of RyR1 by endogenously generated hydrogen peroxide is exerted through dynamic disulfide formation involving multiple Cys residues.
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Photoreceptor proteins initiate microglial activation via Toll-like receptor 4 in retinal degeneration mediated by all-trans-retinal.
J. Biol. Chem.
PUBLISHED: 04-09-2013
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Although several genetic and biochemical factors are associated with the pathogenesis of retinal degeneration, it has yet to be determined how these different impairments can cause similar degenerative phenotypes. Here, we report microglial/macrophage activation in both a Stargardt disease and age-related macular degeneration mouse model caused by delayed clearance of all-trans-retinal from the retina, and in a retinitis pigmentosa mouse model with impaired retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) phagocytosis. Mouse microglia displayed RPE cytotoxicity and increased production of inflammatory chemokines/cytokines, Ccl2, Il1b, and Tnf, after coincubation with ligands that activate innate immunity. Notably, phagocytosis of photoreceptor proteins increased the activation of microglia/macrophages and RPE cells isolated from model mice as well as wild-type mice. The mRNA levels of Tlr2 and Tlr4, which can recognize proteins as their ligands, were elevated in mice with retinal degeneration. Bone marrow-derived macrophages from Tlr4-deficient mice did not increase Ccl2 after coincubation with photoreceptor proteins. Tlr4(-/-)Abca4(-/-)Rdh8(-/-) mice displayed milder retinal degenerative phenotypes than Abca4(-/-)Rdh8(-/-) mice. Additionally, inactivation of microglia/macrophages by pharmacological approaches attenuated mouse retinal degeneration. This study demonstrates an important contribution of TLR4-mediated microglial activation by endogenous photoreceptor proteins in retinal inflammation that aggravates retinal cell death. This pathway is likely to represent an underlying common pathology in degenerative retinal disorders.
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Monoubiquitination of filamin B regulates vascular endothelial growth factor-mediated trafficking of histone deacetylase 7.
Mol. Cell. Biol.
PUBLISHED: 02-11-2013
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Nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of class IIa of histone deacetylases (HDACs) is a key mechanism that controls cell fate and animal development. We have identified the filamin B (FLNB) as a novel HDAC7-interacting protein that is required for temporal and spatial regulation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-mediated HDAC7 cytoplasmic sequestration. This interaction occurs in the cytoplasm and requires monoubiquitination of an evolutionarily conserved lysine 1147 (K1147) in the immunoglobulin (Ig)-like repeat 10 (R10) of FLNB and the nuclear localization sequence of HDAC7. Inhibition of protein kinase C (PKC) blocks VEGF-induced ubiquitination of FLNB and its interaction with HDAC7. Small interfering RNA (siRNA) knockdown of FLNB or ubiquitin (Ub) in human primary endothelial cells blocks VEGF-mediated cytoplasmic accumulation of HDAC7, reduces VEGF-induced expression of the HDAC7 target genes Mmp-10 and Nur77, and inhibits VEGF-induced vascular permeability. Using dominant negative mutants and rescue experiments, we demonstrate the functional significance of FLNB K1147 to interfere with the ability of phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) to promote FLNB-mediated cytoplasmic accumulation of HDAC7. Taken together, our data show that VEGF and PKC promote degradation-independent protein ubiquitination of FLNB to control intracellular trafficking of HDAC7.
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Streptomyces erythraeus trypsin inactivates ?1-antitrypsin.
FEBS Lett.
PUBLISHED: 09-05-2011
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Streptomyces erythraeus trypsin (SET) is a serine protease that is secreted extracellularly by S. erythraeus. We investigated the inhibitory effect of ?(1)-antitrypsin on the catalytic activity of SET. Intriguingly, we found that SET is not inhibited by ?(1)-antitrypsin. Our investigations into the molecular mechanism underlying this observation revealed that SET hydrolyzes the Met-Ser bond in the reaction center loop of ?(1)-antitrypsin. However, SET somehow avoids entrapment by ?(1)-antitrypsin. We also confirmed that ?(1)-antitrypsin loses its inhibitory activity after incubation with SET. Thus, our study demonstrates that SET is not only resistant to ?(1)-antitrypsin but also inactivates ?(1)-antitrypsin.
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Histidine hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry for probing the microenvironment of histidine residues in dihydrofolate reductase.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-18-2011
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Histidine Hydrogen-Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry (His-HDX-MS) determines the HDX rates at the imidazole C(2)-hydrogen of histidine residues. This method provides not only the HDX rates but also the pK(a) values of histidine imidazole rings. His-HDX-MS was used to probe the microenvironment of histidine residues of E. coli dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR), an enzyme proposed to undergo multiple conformational changes during catalysis.
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Reversible methylation of promoter-bound STAT3 by histone-modifying enzymes.
Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A.
PUBLISHED: 11-23-2010
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Following its tyrosine phosphorylation, STAT3 is methylated on K140 by the histone methyl transferase SET9 and demethylated by LSD1 when it is bound to a subset of the promoters that it activates. Methylation of K140 is a negative regulatory event, because its blockade greatly increases the steady-state amount of activated STAT3 and the expression of many (i.e., SOCS3) but not all (i.e., CD14) STAT3 target genes. Biological relevance is shown by the observation that overexpression of SOCS3 when K140 cannot be methylated blocks the ability of cells to activate STAT3 in response to IL-6. K140 methylation does not occur with mutants of STAT3 that do not enter nuclei or bind to DNA. Following treatment with IL-6, events at the SOCS3 promoter occur in an ordered sequence, as shown by chromatin immunoprecipitations. Y705-phosphoryl-STAT3 binds first and S727 is then phosphorylated, followed by the coincident binding of SET9 and dimethylation of K140, and lastly by the binding of LSD1. We conclude that the lysine methylation of promoter-bound STAT3 leads to biologically important down-regulation of the dependent responses and that SET9, which is known to help provide an activating methylation mark to H3K4, is recruited to the newly activated SOCS3 promoter by STAT3.
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Conformational changes in the g protein-coupled receptor rhodopsin revealed by histidine hydrogen-deuterium exchange.
Biochemistry
PUBLISHED: 10-15-2010
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G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are activated by ligand binding, allowing extracellular signals to be efficiently transmitted through the membrane to the G protein recognition site, 40 Å away. Utilizing His residues found spaced throughout the GPCR, rhodopsin, we used His hydrogen-deuterium exchange (His-HDX) to monitor long-time scale structural rearrangements previously inaccessible by other means. The half-lives of His-HDX indicate clear differences in the solvent accessibility of three His residues in rhodopsin/opsin and Zn2+-dependent changes in the pKa for His195. These results indicate the utility of His-HDX in examining structural rearrangements in native source and membrane proteins without requiring structural modification.
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Perfluorooctanoic acid for shotgun proteomics.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 09-25-2010
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Here, we describe the novel use of a volatile surfactant, perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), for shotgun proteomics. PFOA was found to solubilize membrane proteins as effectively as sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). PFOA concentrations up to 0.5% (w/v) did not significantly inhibit trypsin activity. The unique features of PFOA allowed us to develop a single-tube shotgun proteomics method that used all volatile chemicals that could easily be removed by evaporation prior to mass spectrometry analysis. The experimental procedures involved: 1) extraction of proteins in 2% PFOA; 2) reduction of cystine residues with triethyl phosphine and their S-alkylation with iodoethanol; 3) trypsin digestion of proteins in 0.5% PFOA; 4) removal of PFOA by evaporation; and 5) LC-MS/MS analysis of the resulting peptides. The general applicability of the method was demonstrated with the membrane preparation of photoreceptor outer segments. We identified 75 proteins from 1 µg of the tryptic peptides in a single, 1-hour, LC-MS/MS run. About 67% of the proteins identified were classified as membrane proteins. We also demonstrate that a proteolytic (18)O labeling procedure can be incorporated after the PFOA removal step for quantitative proteomic experiments. The present method does not require sample clean-up devices such as solid-phase extractions and membrane filters, so no proteins/peptides are lost in any experimental steps. Thus, this single-tube shotgun proteomics method overcomes the major drawbacks of surfactant use in proteomic experiments.
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Evidence that histidine protonation of receptor-bound anthrax protective antigen is a trigger for pore formation.
Biochemistry
PUBLISHED: 08-03-2010
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The protective antigen (PA) component of the anthrax toxin forms pores within the low pH environment of host endosomes through mechanisms that are poorly understood. It has been proposed that pore formation is dependent on histidine protonation. In previous work, we biosynthetically incorporated 2-fluorohistidine (2-FHis), an isosteric analogue of histidine with a significantly reduced pK(a) ( approximately 1), into PA and showed that the pH-dependent conversion from the soluble prepore to a pore was unchanged. However, we also observed that 2-FHisPA was nonfunctional in the ability to mediate cytotoxicity of CHO-K1 cells by LF(N)-DTA and was defective in translocation through planar lipid bilayers. Here, we show that the defect in cytotoxicity is due to both a defect in translocation and, when bound to the host cellular receptor, an inability to undergo low pH-induced pore formation. Combining X-ray crystallography with hydrogen-deuterium (H-D) exchange mass spectrometry, our studies lead to a model in which hydrogen bonds to the histidine ring are strengthened by receptor binding. The combination of both fluorination and receptor binding is sufficient to block low pH-induced pore formation.
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Cell-Penetrating Penta-Peptides (CPP5s): Measurement of Cell Entry and Protein-Transduction Activity.
Pharmaceuticals (Basel)
PUBLISHED: 06-07-2010
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Previously, we developed cell-penetrating penta-peptides (CPP5s). In the present study, VPTLK and KLPVM, two representative CPP5s, were used to characterize the cell-penetration and protein-transduction activities of these small molecules. Various inhibitors of endocytosis and pinocytosis (chlorpromazine, cytochalasin D, Filipin III, amiloride, methyl-?-cyclodextrin, and nocodazole) were tested. Only cytochalasin D showed suppression of CPP5 entry, though the effect was partial. In addition, CPP5s were able to enter a proteoglycan-deficient CHO cell line. These results suggest that pinocytosis and endocytosis may play only a minor role in the cell entry of CPP5s. By mass spectrometry, we determined that the intracellular concentration of VPTLK ranged from 20 nM to 6.0 ?M when the cells were cultured in medium containing 1 ?M - 1.6 mM VPTLK. To determine the protein-transduction activity of CPP5s, the Tex-LoxP EG cell line, which has a Cre-inducible green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene, was used. VPTLK and KLPVM were added to the N-terminus of Cre, and these fusion proteins were added to the culture medium of Tex-LoxP EG cells. Both VPTLK-Cre and KLPVM-Cre were able to turn on GFP expression in these cells, suggesting that CPP5s have protein-transduction activity. Since CPP5s have very low cytotoxic activity, even at a concentration of 1.6 mM in the medium, CPP5s could be utilized as a new tool for drug delivery into cells.
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Conformational changes in guanylate cyclase-activating protein 1 induced by Ca2+ and N-terminal fatty acid acylation.
Structure
PUBLISHED: 02-16-2010
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Neuronal Ca(2+) sensors (NCS) are high-affinity Ca(2+)-binding proteins critical for regulating a vast range of physiological processes. Guanylate cyclase-activating proteins (GCAPs) are members of the NCS family responsible for activating retinal guanylate cyclases (GCs) at low Ca(2+) concentrations, triggering synthesis of cGMP and recovery of photoreceptor cells to the dark-adapted state. Here we use amide hydrogen-deuterium exchange and radiolytic labeling, and molecular dynamics simulations to study conformational changes induced by Ca(2+) and modulated by the N-terminal myristoyl group. Our data on the conformational dynamics of GCAP1 in solution suggest that Ca(2+) stabilizes the protein but induces relatively small changes in the domain structure; however, loss of Ca(+2) mediates a significant global relaxation and movement of N- and C-terminal domains. This model and the previously described "calcium-myristoyl switch" proposed for recoverin indicate significant diversity in conformational changes among these highly homologous NCS proteins with distinct functions.
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Regulation of NF-kappaB by NSD1/FBXL11-dependent reversible lysine methylation of p65.
Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A.
PUBLISHED: 12-22-2009
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NF-kappaB, a central coordinator of immune and inflammatory responses, must be tightly regulated. We describe a NF-kappaB regulatory pathway that is driven by reversible lysine methylation of the p65 subunit, carried out by a lysine methylase, the nuclear receptor-binding SET domain-containing protein 1 (NSD1), and a lysine demethylase, F-box and leucine-rich repeat protein 11 (FBXL11). Overexpression of FBXL11 inhibits NF-kappaB activity, and a high level of NSD1 activates NF-kappaB and reverses the inhibitory effect of FBXL11, whereas reduced expression of NSD1 decreases NF-kappaB activation. The targets are K218 and K221 of p65, which are methylated in cells with activated NF-kappaB. Overexpression of FBXL11 slowed the growth of HT29 cancer cells, whereas shRNA-mediated knockdown had the opposite effect, and these phenotypes were dependent on K218/K221 methylation. In mouse embryo fibroblasts, the activation of most p65-dependent genes relied on K218/K221 methylation. Importantly, expression of the FBXL11 gene is driven by NF-kappaB, revealing a negative regulatory feedback loop. We conclude that reversible lysine methylation of NF-kappaB is an important element in the complex regulation of this key transcription factor.
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The C-terminus of interferon gamma receptor beta chain (IFNgammaR2) has antiapoptotic activity as a Bax inhibitor.
Cancer Biol. Ther.
PUBLISHED: 09-20-2009
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Bax is a pro-apoptotic protein that mediates intrinsic cell-death signaling. Using a yeast-based functional screening approach, we identified interferon gamma receptor beta chain (IFNgammaR2) as a new Bax suppressor. IFNgammaR2 is a component of the IFNgamma receptor complex along with the IFNgammaR alpha chain (IFNgammaR1). Upon IFNgamma binding, a conformational change in the receptor complex occurs that activates the Jak2/STAT1 signaling cascade. We found that the C-terminal region (amino acids 296-337) of IFNgammaR2 (IFNgammaR2(296-337)) contains a novel Bax inhibitory domain. This portion does not contain the Jak2-binding domain; therefore, the antiapoptotic function of IFNgammaR2 is independent of JAK/STAT signaling. IFNgammaR2(296-337) rescued human cells from apoptosis induced by overexpression of Bax but not Bak. Overexpression of IFNgammaR2 (wild type and IFNgammaR2(296-337)) rescued cells from etoposide and staurosporine, which are known to induce Bax-mediated cell death. Interestingly, IFNgammaR2 inhibited apoptosis induced by the BH3-only protein Bim-EL, suggesting that IFNgammaR2 inhibits Bax activation through a BH3-only protein. Bax and IFNgammaR2 were co-immunoprecipitated from cell lysates prepared from HEK293 and DAMI cells. Furthermore, direct binding of purified recombinant proteins of Bax and IFNgammaR2 was also confirmed. Addition of recombinant Bcl-2 protein to cell lysates significantly reduced the interaction of IFNgammaR2 and Bax, suggesting that Bcl-2 and IFNgammaR2 bind a similar domain of Bax. We found that the C-terminal fragment (cytoplasmic domain) of IFNgammaR2 is expressed in human cancer cell lines of megakaryocytic cancer (DAMI), breast cancer (MDA-MD-468), and prostate cancer (PC3 cells). The presence of the C-terminal fragment of IFNgammaR2 may confer on cancer cells resistance to apoptotic stresses. Our discovery of the anti-Bax activity of the cytoplasmic domain of IFNgammaR2 may shed new light on the mechanism of how cell death is controlled by IFNgamma and Bax.
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Clarin-1, encoded by the Usher Syndrome III causative gene, forms a membranous microdomain: possible role of clarin-1 in organizing the actin cytoskeleton.
J. Biol. Chem.
PUBLISHED: 05-07-2009
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Clarin-1 is the protein product encoded by the gene mutated in Usher syndrome III. Although the molecular function of clarin-1 is unknown, its primary structure predicts four transmembrane domains similar to a large family of membrane proteins that include tetraspanins. Here we investigated the role of clarin-1 by using heterologous expression and in vivo model systems. When expressed in HEK293 cells, clarin-1 localized to the plasma membrane and concentrated in low density compartments distinct from lipid rafts. Clarin-1 reorganized actin filament structures and induced lamellipodia. This actin-reorganizing function was absent in the modified protein encoded by the most prevalent North American Usher syndrome III mutation, the N48K form of clarin-1 deficient in N-linked glycosylation. Proteomics analyses revealed a number of clarin-1-interacting proteins involved in cell-cell adhesion, focal adhesions, cell migration, tight junctions, and regulation of the actin cytoskeleton. Consistent with the hypothesized role of clarin-1 in actin organization, F-actin-enriched stereocilia of auditory hair cells evidenced structural disorganization in Clrn1(-/-) mice. These observations suggest a possible role for clarin-1 in the regulation and homeostasis of actin filaments, and link clarin-1 to the interactive network of Usher syndrome gene products.
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Streptomyces erythraeus trypsin for proteomics applications.
J. Proteome Res.
PUBLISHED: 02-24-2009
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Among trypsin family proteases, bovine and porcine trypsins are currently the enzymes of choice for proteomics applications. However, there are trypsins from other sources that have higher catalytic activities than mammalian trypsins. Of these, Streptomyces erythraeus trypsin (SET) is particularly attractive, because SET has more than 1 order of magnitude greater amidase activity than mammalian trypsin and is resistant to autolytic degradation. These properties are advantageous for many proteomics applications. To evaluate this protease for proteomic applications, we expressed SET in E. coli, purified it to homogeneity, and then examined its enzymatic properties. As expected, recombinant SET (rSET) had greater than an order of magnitude higher amide bond hydrolysis activity (Km/k(cat)) for both N(alpha)-benzoyl-L-arginine-p-nitroanilide and N(alpha)-benzoyl-L-lysine-p-nitroanilide than modified porcine trypsin and did not show any sign of autolytic degradation after 96 h of incubation at 37 degrees C. The performance of rSET for proteomic applications was evaluated by applying the protease for in-solution and in-gel digestion of bovine serum albumin, and for 18O labeling of peptides. These results confirmed that rSET has the potential to be a useful protease in such proteomic experiments. We also report various properties of rSET that are fundamental to the use of this protease for proteomics applications.
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The 27-kDa heat shock protein confers cytoprotective effects through a beta 2-adrenergic receptor agonist-initiated complex with beta-arrestin.
Mol. Pharmacol.
PUBLISHED: 01-27-2009
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Heat shock proteins represent an emerging model for the coordinated, multistep regulation of apoptotic signaling events. Although certain aspects of the biochemistry associated with heat shock protein cytoprotective effects are known, little information is found describing the regulation of heat shock protein responses to harmful stimuli. During screening for noncanonical beta adrenergic receptor signaling pathways in human urothelial cells, using mass spectroscopy techniques, an agonist-dependent interaction with beta-arrestin and the 27-kDa heat shock protein was observed in vitro. Formation of this beta-arrestin/Hsp27 complex in response to the selective beta adrenergic receptor agonist isoproterenol, was subsequently confirmed in situ by immunofluorescent colocalization studies. Radioligand binding techniques characterized a homogeneous population of the beta2 adrenergic receptor subtype expressed on these cells. Using terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase biotin-dUTP nick end labeling, immunoblot analysis and quantitation of caspase-3 activity to detect apoptosis, preincubation of these cells with isoproterenol was found to be sufficient for protection against programmed cell death initiated by staurosporine. RNA interference strategies confirmed the necessity for Hsp27 as well as both beta-arrestin isoforms to confer this cytoprotective consequence of beta adrenergic receptor activation in this cell model. As a result, these studies represent the first description of an agonist-dependent relationship between a small heat shock protein and beta-arrestin to form a previously unknown antiapoptotic "signalosome."
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Quantitative measurement of the solvent accessibility of histidine imidazole groups in proteins.
Biochemistry
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We report a method for expressing the solvent accessibility of histidine imidazole groups in proteins. The method is based on measuring the rate of the hydrogen exchange (HX) reaction of the imidazole C(?1)-hydrogen. The rate profile of the HX reaction as a function of pH gives a sigmoidal curve, which reaches the maximal rate constant (k(max)) on the alkaline side of the sigmoidal curve. To quantitatively describe the solvent accessibility of imidazole groups in proteins, it is necessary to compare the k(max) of the imidazole groups with their intrinsic k(max) ((i)k(max)), the maximal rate constants for the given imidazole groups when they are fully exposed to the bulk solvent. However, the mechanism of the HX reaction suggests that the (i)k(max) of an imidazole group differs depending on its pK(a), and no systematic study has been conducted to clarify how the (i)k(max) is affected by pK(a). We therefore investigated the relationship between (i)k(max) and pK(a) using four imidazole derivatives at three different temperatures. The experimentally determined pK(a)-specific (i)k(max) values allowed us to derive a general formula to estimate the (i)k(max) value of any given imidazole group exhibiting a specific pK(a) at a specific temperature. Using the formula, the protection factors (PF), the ratio of (i)k(max) to k(max), of five imidazole groups in dihydrofolate reductase were obtained and used to express the magnitude of their solvent accessibility. In this definition, the smaller the PF value, the higher the solvent accessibility, and a value of 1 indicates full exposure to the bulk solvent. The solvent accessibility expressed by the PF values agreed well with the solvent accessible surface areas obtained from the X-ray diffraction data.
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Enhanced energy metabolism contributes to the extended life span of calorie-restricted Caenorhabditis elegans.
J. Biol. Chem.
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Caloric restriction (CR) markedly extends life span and improves the health of a broad number of species. Energy metabolism fundamentally contributes to the beneficial effects of CR, but the underlying mechanisms that are responsible for this effect remain enigmatic. A multidisciplinary approach that involves quantitative proteomics, immunochemistry, metabolic quantification, and life span analysis was used to determine how CR, which occurs in the Caenorhabditis elegans eat-2 mutants, modifies energy metabolism of the worm, and whether the observed modifications contribute to the CR-mediated physiological responses. A switch to fatty acid metabolism as an energy source and an enhanced rate of energy metabolism by eat-2 mutant nematodes were detected. Life span analyses validated the important role of these previously unknown alterations of energy metabolism in the CR-mediated longevity of nematodes. As observed in mice, the overexpression of the gene for the nematode analog of the cytosolic form of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase caused a marked extension of the life span in C. elegans, presumably by enhancing energy metabolism via an altered rate of cataplerosis of tricarboxylic acid cycle anions. We conclude that an increase, not a decrease in fuel consumption, via an accelerated oxidation of fuels in the TCA cycle is involved in life span regulation; this mechanism may be conserved across phylogeny.
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Rapid and effective removal of perfluorooctanoic acid from proteomics samples.
Proteomics
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We recently demonstrated that perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), a volatile surfactant, is as effective as sodium dodecyl sulfate at solubilizing the membrane proteins. PFOA can be removed by repeated evaporation prior to mass spectrometry analysis. However, the removal of PFOA by evaporation is a lengthy process that takes approximately 6 h. Toward the goal of decreasing the length of time required to remove PFOA from protein digests, we tested the efficiency of PFOA removal and subsequent peptide recovery using strong cation exchange (SCX) chromatography, hydrophilic interaction chromatography (HILIC), fluorous solid phase extraction (FSPE), and anion exchange (ANX) chromatography. We found that all these chromatographic techniques except ANX chromatography remove PFOA thoroughly from protein digest. Peptide recovery rates from the SCX chromatography varied widely; nonacidic peptides were recovered at a rate of up to 95%, while acidic peptides were recovered at a rate of less than 10%. On the other hand, acidic peptides were recovered well from HILIC, while peptides whose pIs are greater than 6 were recovered poorly. Peptide recovery using FSPE was considerably lower, less than 10% for most of the peptides. These results indicate that the SCX and HILIC chromatography provide a more rapid alternative to the evaporation method for applications in which recovery of entire set of peptides is not required.
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Acetylation of retinal histones in diabetes increases inflammatory proteins: effects of minocycline and manipulation of histone acetyltransferase (HAT) and histone deacetylase (HDAC).
J. Biol. Chem.
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Histone acetylation was significantly increased in retinas from diabetic rats, and this acetylation was inhibited in diabetics treated with minocycline, a drug known to inhibit early diabetic retinopathy in animals. Histone acetylation and expression of inflammatory proteins that have been implicated in the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy were increased likewise in cultured retinal Müller glia grown in a diabetes-like concentration of glucose. Both the acetylation and induction of the inflammatory proteins in elevated glucose levels were significantly inhibited by inhibitors of histone acetyltransferase (garcinol and antisense against the histone acetylase, p300) or activators of histone deacetylase (theophylline and resveratrol) and were increased by the histone deacetylase inhibitor, suberolylanilide hydroxamic acid. We conclude that hyperglycemia causes acetylation of retinal histones (and probably other proteins) and that the acetylation contributes to the hyperglycemia-induced up-regulation of proinflammatory proteins and thereby to the development of diabetic retinopathy.
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Conformational dynamics of activation for the pentameric complex of dimeric G protein-coupled receptor and heterotrimeric G protein.
Structure
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Photoactivation of rhodopsin (Rho), a G protein-coupled receptor, causes conformational changes that provide a specific binding site for the rod G protein, G(t). In this work we employed structural mass spectrometry techniques to elucidate the structural changes accompanying transition of ground state Rho to photoactivated Rho (Rho(?)) and in the pentameric complex between dimeric Rho(?) and heterotrimeric G(t). Observed differences in hydroxyl radical labeling and deuterium uptake between Rho(?) and the (Rho(?))(2)-G(t) complex suggest that photoactivation causes structural relaxation of Rho following its initial tightening upon G(t) coupling. In contrast, nucleotide-free G(t) in the complex is significantly more accessible to deuterium uptake allowing it to accept GTP and mediating complex dissociation. Thus, we provide direct evidence that in the critical step of signal amplification, Rho(?) and G(t) exhibit dissimilar conformational changes when they are coupled in the (Rho(?))(2)-G(t) complex.
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Off-target thiol alkylation by the NADPH oxidase inhibitor 3-benzyl-7-(2-benzoxazolyl)thio-1,2,3-triazolo[4,5-d]pyrimidine (VAS2870).
Free Radic. Biol. Med.
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Specific inhibitors of the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by the NADPH oxidases (Noxs) are potentially important therapeutic agents in the wide range of human diseases that are characterized by excessive ROS production. It has been proposed that VAS2870 (3-benzyl-7-(2-benzoxazolyl)thio-1,2,3- triazolo[4,5-d]pyrimidine), identified as an inhibitor of Nox2 by small-molecule screening, may serve as an example of such an agent. Here we show that VAS2870 inhibits ROS production in the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) of mammalian skeletal muscle, previously identified with Nox4, and thereby abrogates O(2)-coupled redox regulation of the ryanodine receptor-Ca(2+) channel (RyR1). However, we also find that VAS2870 modifies directly identified cysteine thiols within RyR1. Mass spectrometric analysis of RyR1 exposed in situ to VAS2870 and of VAS2870-treated glutathione indicated that thiol modification is through alkylation by the benzyltriazolopyrimidine moiety of VAS2870. Thus, VAS2870 exerts significant off-target effects, and thiol alkylation by VAS2870 (and closely related Nox inhibitors) may in fact replicate some of the effects of ROS on cellular thiol redox status. In addition, we show that SR-localized Nox4 is inhibited by other thiol-alkylating agents, consistent with a causal role for cysteine modification in the inhibition of ROS production by VAS2870.
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JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

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In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.