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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Clonal outbreak of Plasmodium falciparum in eastern Panama.
J. Infect. Dis.
PUBLISHED: 10-23-2014
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Identifying the source of resurgent parasites is paramount to strategic and successful intervention for malaria elimination. Although malaria incidence in Panama is low, a recent outbreak resulted in a six-fold increase in reported cases. We hypothesized parasites sampled from this epidemic might be related and exhibit clonal population structure. We tested the genetic relatedness using informative single nucleotide polymorphisms and drug resistance loci. We found the parasites to be clustered into three clonal subpopulations and shared relatedness with parasites from Colombia. Two clusters of Panamanian parasites shared identical drug resistance haplotypes, and all clusters shared a chloroquine-resistance genotype matching the pfcrt haplotype of Colombian origin. Our findings suggest these resurgent parasite populations are highly clonal and likely resulted from epidemic expansion of imported or vestigial cases. Outbreak investigation using genetic tools can illuminate potential sources of epidemic malaria and guide strategies to prevent further resurgence in areas of malaria elimination.
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Sex-partitioning of the Plasmodium falciparum stage V gametocyte proteome provides insight into falciparum-specific cell biology.
Mol. Cell Proteomics
PUBLISHED: 07-23-2014
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One of the critical gaps in malaria transmission biology and surveillance is our lack of knowledge about Plasmodium falciparum gametocyte biology, especially sexual dimorphic development and how sex ratios that may influence transmission from the human to the mosquito. Dissecting this process has been hampered by the lack of sex-specific protein markers for the circulating, mature stage V gametocytes. The current evidence suggests a high degree of conservation in gametocyte gene complement across Plasmodium, and therefore presumably for sex-specific genes as well. To better our understanding of gametocyte development and subsequent infectiousness to mosquitoes, we undertook a Systematic Subtractive Bioinformatic analysis (filtering) approach to identify sex-specific P. falciparum NF54 protein markers based on a comparison with the Dd2 strain, which is defective in producing males, and with syntenic male and female proteins from the reanalyzed and updated P. berghei (related rodent malaria parasite) gametocyte proteomes. This produced a short list of 174 male- and 258 female-enriched P. falciparum stage V proteins, some of which appear to be under strong diversifying selection, suggesting ongoing adaptation to mosquito vector species. We generated antibodies against three putative female-specific gametocyte stage V proteins in P. falciparum and confirmed either conserved sex-specificity or the lack of cross-species sex-partitioning. Finally, our study provides not only an additional resource for mass spectrometry-derived evidence for gametocyte proteins but also lays down the foundation for rational screening and development of novel sex-partitioned protein biomarkers and transmission-blocking vaccine candidates.
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Plasmodium falciparum transmission stages accumulate in the human bone marrow.
Sci Transl Med
PUBLISHED: 07-11-2014
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Transmission of Plasmodium falciparum malaria parasites requires formation and development of gametocytes, yet all but the most mature of these sexual parasite forms are absent from the blood circulation. We performed a systematic organ survey in pediatric cases of fatal malaria to characterize the spatial dynamics of gametocyte development in the human host. Histological studies revealed a niche in the extravascular space of the human bone marrow where gametocytes formed in erythroid precursor cells and underwent development before reentering the circulation. Accumulation of gametocytes in the hematopoietic system of human bone marrow did not rely on cytoadherence to the vasculature as does sequestration of asexual-stage parasites. This suggests a different mechanism for the sequestration of gametocytes that could potentially be exploited to block malaria transmission.
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Sex: how malaria parasites get turned on.
Curr. Biol.
PUBLISHED: 05-08-2014
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The mechanisms underlying sexual stage switching in Plasmodium spp. have hitherto remained a mystery. However, two recent studies have revealed that an apicomplexan-specific DNA-binding protein is essential for the initiation of this cell fate decision, ultimately providing the malaria community with a novel and important tool in the battle to prevent malaria transmission.
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A Plasmodium falciparum histone deacetylase regulates antigenic variation and gametocyte conversion.
Cell Host Microbe
PUBLISHED: 01-26-2014
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The asexual forms of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum are adapted for chronic persistence in human red blood cells, continuously evading host immunity using epigenetically regulated antigenic variation of virulence-associated genes. Parasite survival on a population level also requires differentiation into sexual forms, an obligatory step for further human transmission. We reveal that the essential nuclear gene, P. falciparum histone deacetylase 2 (PfHda2), is a global silencer of virulence gene expression and controls the frequency of switching from the asexual cycle to sexual development. PfHda2 depletion leads to dysregulated expression of both virulence-associated var genes and PfAP2-g, a transcription factor controlling sexual conversion, and is accompanied by increases in gametocytogenesis. Mathematical modeling further indicates that PfHda2 has likely evolved to optimize the parasite's infectious period by achieving low frequencies of virulence gene expression switching and sexual conversion. This common regulation of cellular transcriptional programs mechanistically links parasite transmissibility and virulence.
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The role of extracellular vesicles in Plasmodium and other protozoan parasites.
Cell. Microbiol.
PUBLISHED: 01-06-2014
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Protozoan parasites and other microorganisms use various pathways to communicate within their own populations and to manipulate their outside environments, with the ultimate goal of balancing the rate of growth and transmission. In higher eukaryotes, including humans, circulating extracellular vesicles are increasingly recognized as key mediators of physiological and pathological processes. Recent evidence suggests that protozoan parasites, including those responsible for major human diseases such as malaria and Chagas disease, use similar machinery. Indeed, intracellular and extracellular protozoan parasites secrete extracellular vesicles to promote growth and induce transmission, to evade the host immune system, and to manipulate the microenvironment. In this review we will discuss the general pathways of extracellular vesicle biogenesis and their functions in protozoan infections.
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Molecular evidence for the localization of Plasmodium falciparum immature gametocytes in the bone marrow.
Blood
PUBLISHED: 12-13-2013
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Plasmodium falciparum immature gametocytes are not observed in peripheral blood. However, gametocyte stages in organs such as the bone marrow have never been assessed by molecular techniques with increased sensitivities than optical microscopy. We quantified P. falciparum sexual stages in bone marrow (n=174) and peripheral blood (n=70) of Mozambican anemic children by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) targeting transcripts specific for early (PF14_0748; PHISTa), intermediate (PF13_0247; Pfs48/45) and mature (PF10_0303; Pfs25) gametocytes. Among children positive for the P. falciparum housekeeping gene (PF08_0085; ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme gene) in bone marrow (n=136) and peripheral blood (n=25), prevalence of immature gametocytes was higher in bone marrow than peripheral blood (early: 95% versus 20%, p<0.001; and intermediate: 80% versus 16%; p<0.001), as were transcript levels (p<0.001 for both stages). In contrast, mature gametocytes were more prevalent (100% versus 51%, p<0.001) and abundant (p<0.001) in peripheral blood than in the bone marrow. Severe anemia (3.57, 95%CI[1.49-8.53]) and dyserythropoiesis (6.21, 95%CI[2.24-17.25]) were independently associated with a higher prevalence of mature gametocytes in bone marrow. Our results highlight the high prevalence and abundance of early sexual stages in bone marrow, as well as a relationship between hematological disturbances and gametocyte development in this tissue.
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Inferring developmental stage composition from gene expression in human malaria.
PLoS Comput. Biol.
PUBLISHED: 12-01-2013
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In the current era of malaria eradication, reducing transmission is critical. Assessment of transmissibility requires tools that can accurately identify the various developmental stages of the malaria parasite, particularly those required for transmission (sexual stages). Here, we present a method for estimating relative amounts of Plasmodium falciparum asexual and sexual stages from gene expression measurements. These are modeled using constrained linear regression to characterize stage-specific expression profiles within mixed-stage populations. The resulting profiles were analyzed functionally by gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA), confirming differentially active pathways such as increased mitochondrial activity and lipid metabolism during sexual development. We validated model predictions both from microarrays and from quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) measurements, based on the expression of a small set of key transcriptional markers. This sufficient marker set was identified by backward selection from the whole genome as available from expression arrays, targeting one sentinel marker per stage. The model as learned can be applied to any new microarray or qRT-PCR transcriptional measurement. We illustrate its use in vitro in inferring changes in stage distribution following stress and drug treatment and in vivo in identifying immature and mature sexual stage carriers within patient cohorts. We believe this approach will be a valuable resource for staging lab and field samples alike and will have wide applicability in epidemiological studies of malaria transmission.
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Torins are potent antimalarials that block replenishment of Plasmodium liver stage parasitophorous vacuole membrane proteins.
Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A.
PUBLISHED: 07-08-2013
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Residence within a customized vacuole is a highly successful strategy used by diverse intracellular microorganisms. The parasitophorous vacuole membrane (PVM) is the critical interface between Plasmodium parasites and their possibly hostile, yet ultimately sustaining, host cell environment. We show that torins, developed as ATP-competitive mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) kinase inhibitors, are fast-acting antiplasmodial compounds that unexpectedly target the parasite directly, blocking the dynamic trafficking of the Plasmodium proteins exported protein 1 (EXP1) and upregulated in sporozoites 4 (UIS4) to the liver stage PVM and leading to efficient parasite elimination by the hepatocyte. Torin2 has single-digit, or lower, nanomolar potency in both liver and blood stages of infection in vitro and is likewise effective against both stages in vivo, with a single oral dose sufficient to clear liver stage infection. Parasite elimination and perturbed trafficking of liver stage PVM-resident proteins are both specific aspects of torin-mediated Plasmodium liver stage inhibition, indicating that torins have a distinct mode of action compared with currently used antimalarials.
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Malaria-infected erythrocyte-derived microvesicles mediate cellular communication within the parasite population and with the host immune system.
Cell Host Microbe
PUBLISHED: 03-10-2013
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Humans and mice infected with different Plasmodium strains are known to produce microvesicles derived from the infected red blood cells (RBCs), denoted RMVs. Studies in mice have shown that RMVs are elevated during infection and have proinflammatory activity. Here we present a detailed characterization of RMV composition and function in the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. Proteomics profiling revealed the enrichment of multiple host and parasite proteins, in particular of parasite antigens associated with host cell membranes and proteins involved in parasite invasion into RBCs. RMVs are quantitatively released during the asexual parasite cycle prior to parasite egress. RMVs demonstrate potent immunomodulatory properties on human primary macrophages and neutrophils. Additionally, RMVs are internalized by infected red blood cells and stimulate production of transmission stage parasites in a dose-dependent manner. Thus, RMVs mediate cellular communication within the parasite population and with the host innate immune system.
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Protein export in malaria parasites: many membranes to cross.
Curr. Opin. Microbiol.
PUBLISHED: 02-15-2013
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The continuous multiplication of Plasmodium parasites in red blood cells leads to a rapid increase in parasite numbers and is responsible for the disease symptoms of malaria. Survival and virulence of the parasite are linked to parasite-induced changes of the host red blood cells. These alterations require export of a large number of parasite proteins that are trafficked across multiple membranes to reach the host cell. Two classes of exported proteins are known, those with a conserved Plasmodium export element (PEXEL/HT) or those without this motif (PNEPs). Recent work has revealed new aspects of the determinants required for export of these 2 protein classes, shedding new light on the mode of trafficking during the different transport steps en route to the host cell.
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Functional analysis of the exported type IV HSP40 protein PfGECO in Plasmodium falciparum gametocytes.
Eukaryotic Cell
PUBLISHED: 09-30-2011
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During Plasmodium falciparum infection, host red blood cell (RBC) remodeling is required for the parasites survival. Such modifications are mediated by the export of parasite proteins into the RBC that alter the architecture of the RBC membrane and enable cytoadherence. It is probable that some exported proteins also play a protective role against the host defense response. This may be of particular importance for the gametocyte stage of the life cycle that is responsible for malaria transmission, since the gametocyte remains in contact with blood as it proceeds through five morphological stages (I to V) during its 12-day maturation. Using microarray analysis, we identified several genes with encoded secretory or export sequences that were differentially expressed during early gametocytogenesis. One of these, PfGECO, encodes a predicted type IV heat shock protein 40 (HSP40) that we show is expressed in gametocyte stages I to IV and is exported to the RBC cytoplasm. HSPs are traditionally induced under stressful conditions to maintain homeostasis, but PfGECO expression was not increased upon heat shock, suggesting an alternate function. Targeted disruption of PfGECO indicated that the gene is not essential for gametocytogenesis in vitro, and quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) showed that there was no compensatory expression of the other type IV HSP40 genes. Although P. falciparum HSP40 members are implicated in the trafficking of proteins to the RBC surface, removal of PfGECO did not affect the targeting of other exported gametocyte proteins. This work has expanded the repertoire of known gametocyte-exported proteins to include a type IV HSP40, PfGECO.
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A high-throughput screen targeting malaria transmission stages opens new avenues for drug development.
J. Infect. Dis.
PUBLISHED: 04-20-2011
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A major goal of the worldwide malaria eradication program is the reduction and eventual elimination of malaria transmission. All currently available antimalarial compounds were discovered on the basis of their activity against the asexually reproducing red blood cell stages of the parasite, which are responsible for the morbidity and mortality of human malaria. Resistance against these compounds is widespread, and there is an urgent need for novel approaches to reduce the emergence of resistance to new antimalarials as they are introduced. We have established and validated the first high-throughput assay targeting the red blood cell parasite stage required for transmission, the sexually reproducing gametocyte. This assay will permit identification of compounds specifically targeting the transmission stages in addition to the asexual stage parasites. Such stage-specific compounds may be used in a combination therapy, reducing the emergence of resistance by blocking transmission of resistant parasites that may be selected in a patient.
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Optimization of flow cytometric detection and cell sorting of transgenic Plasmodium parasites using interchangeable optical filters.
Malar. J.
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Malaria remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Flow cytometry-based assays that take advantage of fluorescent protein (FP)-expressing malaria parasites have proven to be valuable tools for quantification and sorting of specific subpopulations of parasite-infected red blood cells. However, identification of rare subpopulations of parasites using green fluorescent protein (GFP) labelling is complicated by autofluorescence (AF) of red blood cells and low signal from transgenic parasites. It has been suggested that cell sorting yield could be improved by using filters that precisely match the emission spectrum of GFP.
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Host cell deformability is linked to transmission in the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum.
Cell. Microbiol.
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Gametocyte maturation in Plasmodium falciparum is a critical step in the transmission of malaria. While the majority of parasites proliferate asexually in red blood cells, a small fraction of parasites undergo sexual conversion and mature over 2 weeks to become competent for transmission to a mosquito vector. Immature gametocytes sequester in deep tissues while mature stages must be able to circulate, pass the spleen and present themselves to the mosquito vector in order to complete transmission. Sequestration of asexual red blood cell stage parasites has been investigated in great detail. These studies have demonstrated that induction of cytoadherence properties through specific receptor-ligand interactions coincides with a significant increase in host cell stiffness. In contrast, the adherence and biophysical properties of gametocyte-infected red blood cells have not been studied systematically. Utilizing a transgenic line for 3D live imaging, in vitro capillary assays and 3D finite element whole cell modelling, we studied the role of cellular deformability in determining the circulatory characteristics of gametocytes. Our analysis shows that the red blood cell deformability of immature gametocytes displays an overall decrease followed by rapid restoration in mature gametocytes. Intriguingly, simulations suggest that along with deformability variations, the morphological changes of the parasite may play an important role in tissue distribution in vivo. Taken together, we present a model, which suggests that mature but not immature gametocytes circulate in the peripheral blood for uptake in the mosquito blood meal and transmission to another human host thus ensuring long-term survival of the parasite.
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Drug screen targeted at Plasmodium liver stages identifies a potent multistage antimalarial drug.
J. Infect. Dis.
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Plasmodium parasites undergo a clinically silent and obligatory developmental phase in the hosts liver cells before they are able to infect erythrocytes and cause malaria symptoms. To overcome the scarcity of compounds targeting the liver stage of malaria, we screened a library of 1037 existing drugs for their ability to inhibit Plasmodium hepatic development. Decoquinate emerged as the strongest inhibitor of Plasmodium liver stages, both in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, decoquinate kills the parasites replicative blood stages and is active against developing gametocytes, the forms responsible for transmission. The drug acts by selectively and specifically inhibiting the parasites mitochondrial bc(1) complex, with little cross-resistance with the antimalarial drug atovaquone. Oral administration of a single dose of decoquinate effectively prevents the appearance of disease, warranting its exploitation as a potent antimalarial compound.
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A PIP Gets the plasmodium protein export pathway going.
Cell Host Microbe
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Survival of blood stage malaria parasites requires extensive host cell remodeling, which is facilitated by secretion of parasite proteins via a dedicated protein export pathway. In a recent Cell paper, Bhattacharjee et al., (2012) describe PI(3)P binding as one of the first steps in targeting parasite proteins to the host cell.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

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We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

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In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.