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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Early- versus late-onset systemic sclerosis: differences in clinical presentation and outcome in 1037 patients.
Medicine (Baltimore)
PUBLISHED: 03-21-2014
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Peak age at onset of systemic sclerosis (SSc) is between 20 and 50 years, although SSc is also described in both young and elderly patients. We conducted the present study to determine if age at disease onset modulates the clinical characteristics and outcome of SSc patients. The Spanish Scleroderma Study Group recruited 1037 patients with a mean follow-up of 5.2 ± 6.8 years. Based on the mean ± 1 standard deviation (SD) of age at disease onset (45 ± 15 yr) of the whole series, patients were classified into 3 groups: age ? 30 years (early onset), age between 31 and 59 years (standard onset), and age ? 60 years (late onset). We compared initial and cumulative manifestations, immunologic features, and death rates. The early-onset group included 195 patients; standard-onset group, 651; and late-onset, 191 patients. The early-onset group had a higher prevalence of esophageal involvement (72% in early-onset compared with 67% in standard-onset and 56% in late-onset; p = 0.004), and myositis (11%, 7.2%, and 2.9%, respectively; p = 0.009), but a lower prevalence of centromere antibodies (33%, 46%, and 47%, respectively; p = 0.007). In contrast, late-onset SSc was characterized by a lower prevalence of digital ulcers (54%, 41%, and 34%, respectively; p < 0.001) but higher rates of heart conduction system abnormalities (9%, 13%, and 21%, respectively; p = 0.004). Pulmonary hypertension was found in 25% of elderly patients and in 12% of the youngest patients (p = 0.010). After correction for the population effects of age and sex, standardized mortality ratio was shown to be higher in younger patients. The results of the present study confirm that age at disease onset is associated with differences in clinical presentation and outcome in SSc patients.
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A genome-wide association study follow-up suggests a possible role for PPARG in systemic sclerosis susceptibility.
Arthritis Res. Ther.
PUBLISHED: 01-09-2014
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A recent genome-wide association study (GWAS) comprising a French cohort of systemic sclerosis (SSc) reported several non-HLA single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) showing a nominal association in the discovery phase. We aimed to identify previously overlooked susceptibility variants by using a follow-up strategy.
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Autoimmune manifestations of Kikuchi disease.
Semin. Arthritis Rheum.
PUBLISHED: 08-21-2011
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Kikuchis disease (KD) has been associated with the presence of autoantibodies, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), and other autoimmune diseases. The aim of this study was to assess the frequency of autoimmune manifestations in a KD cohort with a long follow-up.
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High prevalence of pulmonary hypertension in patients with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia.
Eur. J. Intern. Med.
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Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is a vascular disorder causing mucocutaneous telangiectases and visceral arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is considered an uncommon complication of HHT whose impact on the survival of these patients is currently unknown.
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Synovial fluid eosinophilia: a case series with a long follow-up and literature review.
Rheumatology (Oxford)
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To establish the frequency and describe the characteristics of a cohort of patients with SF eosinophilia (SFE) and a long clinical follow-up. A systematic review of the literature on this topic was performed.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.