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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Macrophage migration inhibitory factor is required for recruitment of scar-associated macrophages during liver fibrosis.
J. Leukoc. Biol.
PUBLISHED: 11-16-2014
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Recruitment of peripheral monocytes to the liver is a key contributor to the response to injury. MIF can act as a chemokine and cytokine, regulating innate immune responses in many tissues and cell types. We hypothesized that MIF contributes to the progression of CCl4-induced hepatic fibrosis by regulating recruitment of SAM. SAMs dynamically regulate HSC activation and ECM degradation. To gain insight into the role of MIF in progression of liver fibrosis, we investigated markers of fibrosis and immune responses after chronic CCl4 administration to female C57BL/6 and MIF(-/-) mice. Chronic CCl4 exposure increased activation of HSC in WT mice, indicated by increased expression of ?SMA mRNA and protein, as well as mRNA for collagen 1?1; these responses were blunted in female MIF(-/-) mice. Despite lower activation of HSC in MIF(-/-) mice, accumulation of ECM was similar in WT and MIF(-/-)mice, suggesting a decreased rate of ECM degradation. Recruitment of SAMs was lower in MIF(-/-) mice compared with WT mice, both in their initial inflammatory phenotype, as well as in the later phase as proresolution macrophages. The decreased presence of resolution macrophages was associated with lower expression of MMP13 in MIF(-/-) mice. Taken together, these data indicate that MIF-dependent recruitment of SAMs contributes to degradation of ECM via MMP13, highlighting the importance of appropriate recruitment and phenotypic profile of macrophages in the resolution of fibrosis.
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Moderate, chronic ethanol feeding exacerbates carbon-tetrachloride-induced hepatic fibrosis via hepatocyte-specific hypoxia inducible factor 1?
Pharmacol Res Perspect
PUBLISHED: 08-05-2014
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The hypoxia-sensing transcriptional factor HIF1? is implicated in a variety of hepato-pathological conditions; however, the contribution of hepatocyte-derived HIF1? during progression of alcoholic liver injury is still controversial. HIF1? induces a variety of genes including those involved in apoptosis via p53 activation. Increased hepatocyte apoptosis is critical for progression of liver inflammation, stellate cell activation and fibrosis. Using hepatocyte-specific HIF1?-deficient mice (?HepHIF1?-/-), here we investigated the contribution of HIF1? to ethanol-induced hepatocyte apoptosis and its role in amplification of fibrosis after carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) exposure. Moderate ethanol feeding (11% of Kcal) induced accumulation of hypoxia-sensitive pimonidazole adducts and HIF1? expression in the liver within 4 days of ethanol feeding. Chronic CCl4 treatment increased M30-positive cells, a marker of hepatocyte apoptosis in pair-fed control mice. Concomitant ethanol feeding (11% of Kcal) amplified CCl4-induced hepatocyte apoptosis in livers of wild-type mice, associated with elevated p53(K386)acetylation, PUMA expression and Ly6c+ cell infiltration. Subsequent to increased apoptosis, ethanol enhanced induction of pro-fibrotic markers including stellate cell activation, collagen 1 expression and extracellular matrix deposition, following CCl4 exposure. Ethanol-induced exacerbation of hepatocyte apoptosis, p53(K386) acetylation and PUMA expression following CCl4 exposure was attenuated in livers of ?HepHIF1?-/- mice. This protection was also associated with a reduction in Ly6c(+) cell infiltration and decreased fibrosis in livers of ?HepHIF1?-/- mice. In summary, these results indicate that moderate ethanol exposure leads to hypoxia/HIF1?-mediated signaling in hepatocytes and induction of p53-dependent apoptosis of hepatocytes, resulting in increased hepatic fibrosis during chronic CCl4 exposure.
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Protective role of HO-1 and carbon monoxide in ethanol-induced hepatocyte cell death and liver injury in mice.
J. Hepatol.
PUBLISHED: 04-04-2014
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Alcoholic liver disease is associated with inflammation and cell death. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is a stress-inducible enzyme with anti-apoptotic and anti-inflammatory properties. Here we tested the hypothesis that induction of HO-1 or treatment with a carbon monoxide releasing molecule (CORM) during chronic ethanol exposure protects and/or reverses ethanol-induced liver injury.
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Alcohol-induced autophagy contributes to loss in skeletal muscle mass.
Autophagy
PUBLISHED: 01-31-2014
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Patients with alcoholic cirrhosis and hepatitis have severe muscle loss. Since ethanol impairs skeletal muscle protein synthesis but does not increase ubiquitin proteasome-mediated proteolysis, we investigated whether alcohol-induced autophagy contributes to muscle loss. Autophagy induction was studied in: A) Human skeletal muscle biopsies from alcoholic cirrhotics and controls, B) Gastrocnemius muscle from ethanol and pair-fed mice, and C) Ethanol-exposed murine C2C12 myotubes, by examining the expression of autophagy markers assessed by immunoblotting and real-time PCR. Expression of autophagy genes and markers were increased in skeletal muscle from humans and ethanol-fed mice, and in myotubes following ethanol exposure. Importantly, pulse-chase experiments showed suppression of myotube proteolysis upon ethanol-treatment with the autophagy inhibitor, 3-methyladenine (3MA) and not by MG132, a proteasome inhibitor. Correspondingly, ethanol-treated C2C12 myotubes stably expressing GFP-LC3B showed increased autophagy flux as measured by accumulation of GFP-LC3B vesicles with confocal microscopy. The ethanol-induced increase in LC3B lipidation was reversed upon knockdown of Atg7, a critical autophagy gene and was associated with reversal of the ethanol-induced decrease in myotube diameter. Consistently, CT image analysis of muscle area in alcoholic cirrhotics was significantly reduced compared with control subjects. In order to determine whether ethanol per se or its metabolic product, acetaldehyde, stimulates autophagy, C2C12 myotubes were treated with ethanol in the presence of the alcohol dehydrogenase inhibitor (4-methylpyrazole) or the acetaldehyde dehydrogenase inhibitor (cyanamide). LC3B lipidation increased with acetaldehyde treatment and increased further with the addition of cyanamide. We conclude that muscle autophagy is increased by ethanol exposure and contributes to sarcopenia.
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Mice lacking C1q are protected from high fat diet-induced hepatic insulin resistance and impaired glucose homeostasis.
J. Biol. Chem.
PUBLISHED: 06-20-2013
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Complement activation is implicated in the development of obesity and insulin resistance, and loss of signaling by the anaphylatoxin C3a prevents obesity-induced insulin resistance in mice. Here we have identified C1q in the classical pathway as required for activation of complement in response to high fat diets. After 8 weeks of high fat diet, wild-type mice became obese and developed glucose intolerance. This was associated with increased apoptotic cell death and accumulation of complement activation products (C3b/iC3b/C3c) in liver and adipose tissue. Previous studies have shown that high fat diet-induced apoptosis is dependent on Bid; here we report that Bid-mediated apoptosis was required for complement activation in adipose and liver. Although C1qa deficiency had no effect on high fat diet-induced apoptosis, accumulation of complement activation products and the metabolic complications of high fat diet-induced obesity were dependent on C1q. When wild-type mice were fed a high fat diet for only 3 days, hepatic insulin resistance was associated with the accumulation of C3b/iC3b/C3c in the liver. Mice deficient in C3a receptor were protected against this early high fat diet-induced hepatic insulin resistance, whereas mice deficient in the negative complement regulator CD55/DAF were more sensitive to the high fat diet. C1qa(-/-) mice were also protected from high fat diet-induced hepatic insulin resistance and complement activation. Evidence of complement activation was also detected in adipose tissue of obese women compared with lean women. Together, these studies reveal an important role for C1q in the classical pathway of complement activation in the development of high fat diet-induced insulin resistance.
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Absence of receptor interacting protein kinase 3 prevents ethanol-induced liver injury.
Hepatology
PUBLISHED: 03-14-2013
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Hepatocyte cell death via apoptosis and necrosis are major hallmarks of ethanol-induced liver injury. However, inhibition of apoptosis is not sufficient to prevent ethanol-induced hepatocyte injury or inflammation. Because receptor-interacting protein kinase (RIP) 3-mediated necroptosis, a nonapoptotic cell death pathway, is implicated in a variety of pathological conditions, we tested the hypothesis that ethanol-induced liver injury is RIP3-dependent and RIP1-independent. Increased expression of RIP3 was detected in livers of mice after chronic ethanol feeding, as well as in liver biopsies from patients with alcoholic liver disease. Chronic ethanol feeding failed to induce RIP3 in the livers of cytochrome P450 2E1 (CYP2E1)-deficient mice, indicating CYP2E1-mediated ethanol metabolism is critical for RIP3 expression in response to ethanol feeding. Mice lacking RIP3 were protected from ethanol-induced steatosis, hepatocyte injury, and expression of proinflammatory cytokines. In contrast, RIP1 expression in mouse liver remained unchanged following ethanol feeding, and inhibition of RIP1 kinase by necrostatin-1 did not attenuate ethanol-induced hepatocyte injury. Ethanol-induced apoptosis, assessed by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate nick-end labeling-positive nuclei and accumulation of cytokeratin-18 fragments in the liver, was independent of RIP3. Conclusion: CYP2E1-dependent RIP3 expression induces hepatocyte necroptosis during ethanol feeding. Ethanol-induced hepatocyte injury is RIP3-dependent, but independent of RIP1 kinase activity; intervention of this pathway could be targeted as a potential therapeutic strategy.
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Macrophage migration inhibitory factor contributes to ethanol-induced liver injury by mediating cell injury, steatohepatitis, and steatosis.
Hepatology
PUBLISHED: 01-18-2013
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Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), a multipotent protein that exhibits both cytokine and chemotactic properties, is expressed by many cell types, including hepatocytes and nonparenchymal cells. We hypothesized that MIF is a key contributor to liver injury after ethanol exposure. Female C57BL/6 or MIF-/- mice were fed an ethanol-containing liquid diet or pair-fed control diet for 4 (11% total kcal;early response) or 25 (32% kcal; chronic response) days. Expression of MIF messenger RNA (mRNA) was induced at both 4 days and 25 days of ethanol feeding. After chronic ethanol, hepatic triglycerides and plasma alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) were increased in wildtype, but not MIF-/-, mice. In order to understand the role of MIF in chronic ethanol-induced liver injury, we investigated the early response of wildtype and MIF-/- to ethanol. Ethanol feeding for 4 days increased apoptosis of hepatic macrophages and activated complement in both wildtype and MIF-/- mice. However, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-?) expression was increased only in wildtype mice. This attenuation of TNF-? expression was associated with fewer F4/80+ macrophages in liver of MIF-/- mice. After 25 days of ethanol feeding, chemokine expression was increased in wildtype mice, but not MIF-/- mice. Again, this protection was associated with decreased F4/80+ cells in MIF-/- mice after ethanol feeding. Chronic ethanol feeding also sensitized wildtype, but not MIF-/-, mice to lipopolysaccharide, increasing chemokine expression and monocyte recruitment into the liver. Conclusion: Taken together, these data indicate that MIF is an important mediator in the regulation of chemokine production and immune cell infiltration in the liver during ethanol feeding and promotes ethanol-induced steatosis and hepatocyte damage.
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Adenosine 2A receptor antagonist prevented and reversed liver fibrosis in a mouse model of ethanol-exacerbated liver fibrosis.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2013
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The effect of moderate alcohol consumption on liver fibrosis is not well understood, but evidence suggests that adenosine may play a role in mediating the effects of moderate ethanol on tissue injury. Ethanol increases the concentration of adenosine in the liver. Adenosine 2A receptor (A2AR) activation is known to enhance hepatic stellate cell (HSC) activation and A2AR deficient mice are protected from fibrosis in mice. Making use of a novel mouse model of moderate ethanol consumption in which female C57BL/6J mice were allowed continued access to 2% (vol/vol) ethanol (11% calories) or pair-fed control diets for 2 days, 2 weeks or 5 weeks and superimposed with exposure to CCl4, we tested the hypothesis that moderate ethanol consumption increases fibrosis in response to carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) and that treatment of mice with an A2AR antagonist prevents and/or reverses this ethanol-induced increase in liver fibrosis. Neither the expression or activity of CYP2E1, required for bio-activation of CCl4, nor AST and ALT activity in the plasma were affected by ethanol, indicating that moderate ethanol did not increase the direct hepatotoxicity of CCl4. However, ethanol feeding enhanced HSC activation and exacerbated liver fibrosis upon exposure to CCl4. This was associated with an increased sinusoidal angiogenic response in the liver. Treatment with A2AR antagonist both prevented and reversed the ability of ethanol to exacerbate liver fibrosis.
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Molecular mechanism for adiponectin-dependent M2 macrophage polarization: link between the metabolic and innate immune activity of full-length adiponectin.
J. Biol. Chem.
PUBLISHED: 02-25-2011
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The anti-inflammatory effects of globular adiponectin (gAcrp) are mediated by IL-10/heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1)-dependent pathways. Although full-length (flAcrp) adiponectin also suppresses LPS-induced pro-inflammatory signaling, its signaling mechanisms are not yet understood. The aim of this study was to examine the differential mechanisms by which gAcrp and flAcrp suppress pro-inflammatory signaling in macrophages. Chronic ethanol feeding increased LPS-stimulated TNF-? expression by Kupffer cells, associated with a shift to an M1 macrophage polarization. Both gAcrp and flAcrp suppressed TNF-? expression in Kupffer cells; however, only the effect of gAcrp was dependent on IL-10. Similarly, inhibition of HO-1 activity or siRNA knockdown of HO-1 in RAW264.7 macrophages only partially attenuated the suppressive effects of flAcrp on MyD88-dependent and -independent cytokine signatures. Instead, flAcrp, acting via the adiponectin R2 receptor, potently shifted the polarization of Kupffer cells and RAW264.7 macrophages to an M2 phenotype. gAcrp, acting via the adiponectin R1 receptor, was much less effective at eliciting an M2 pattern of gene expression. M2 polarization was also partially dependent on AMP-activated kinase. flAcrp polarized RAW264.7 macrophages to an M2 phenotype in an IL-4/STAT6-dependent mechanism. flAcrp also increased the expression of genes involved in oxidative phosphorylation in RAW264.7 macrophages, similar to the effect of flAcrp on hepatocytes. In summary, these data demonstrate that gAcrp and flAcrp utilize differential signaling strategies to decrease the sensitivity of macrophages to activation by TLR4 ligands, with flAcrp utilizing an IL-4/STAT6-dependent mechanism to shift macrophage polarization to the M2/anti-inflammatory phenotype.
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Chronic alcohol exposure increases circulating bioactive oxidized phospholipids.
J. Biol. Chem.
PUBLISHED: 05-11-2010
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Ethanol metabolism by liver generates short lived reactive oxygen species that damage liver but also affects distal organs through unknown mechanisms. We hypothesized that dissemination of liver oxidative stress proceeds through release of biologically active oxidized lipids to the circulation. We searched for these by tandem mass spectrometry in plasma of rats fed a Lieber-DeCarli ethanol diet or in patients with established alcoholic liver inflammation, steatohepatitis. We found a severalfold increase in plasma peroxidized phosphatidylcholines, inflammatory and pro-apoptotic oxidatively truncated phospholipids, and platelet-activating factor, a remarkably potent and pleiotropic inflammatory mediator, in rats chronically ingesting ethanol. Circulating peroxidized phospholipids also increased in humans with established steatohepatitis. However, reactive oxygen species generated by liver ethanol catabolism were not directly responsible for circulating oxidized phospholipids because the delayed appearance of these lipids did not correlate with ethanol exposure, hepatic oxidative insult, nor plasma alanine transaminase marking hepatocyte damage. Rather, circulating oxidized lipids correlated with steatohepatitis and tumor necrosis factor-alpha deposition in liver. The organic osmolyte 2-aminoethylsulfonic acid (taurine), which reduces liver endoplasmic reticulum stress and inflammation, even though it is not an antioxidant, abolished liver damage and the increase in circulating oxidized phospholipids. Thus, circulating oxidized phospholipids are markers of developing steatohepatitis temporally distinct from oxidant stress associated with hepatic ethanol catabolism. Previously, circulating markers of the critical transition to pathologic steatohepatitis were unknown. Circulating oxidatively truncated phospholipids are pro-inflammatory and pro-apoptotic mediators with the potential to systemically distribute the effect of chronic ethanol exposure. Suppressing hepatic inflammation, not ethanol catabolism, reduces circulating inflammatory and apoptotic agonists.
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Complement and alcoholic liver disease: role of C1q in the pathogenesis of ethanol-induced liver injury in mice.
Gastroenterology
PUBLISHED: 03-08-2010
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Complement is involved in the development of alcoholic liver disease in mice; however, the mechanisms for complement activation during ethanol exposure have not been identified. C1q, the recognition subunit of the first complement component, binds to apoptotic cells, thereby activating the classical complement pathway. Because ethanol exposure increases hepatocellular apoptosis, we hypothesized that ethanol-induced apoptosis would lead to activation of complement via the classical pathway.
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The anti-inflammatory effects of adiponectin are mediated via a heme oxygenase-1-dependent pathway in rat Kupffer cells.
Hepatology
PUBLISHED: 01-07-2010
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Altered expression and activity of immunomodulatory cytokines plays a major role in the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver disease. Chronic ethanol feeding increases the sensitivity of Kupffer cells, the resident hepatic macrophage, to lipopolysaccharide (LPS), leading to increased tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) expression. This sensitization is normalized by treatment of primary cultures of Kupffer cells with adiponectin, an anti-inflammatory adipokine. Here we tested the hypothesis that adiponectin-mediated suppression of LPS signaling in Kupffer cells is mediated via an interleukin-10 (IL-10)/heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) pathway after chronic ethanol feeding. Knockdown of IL-10 expression in primary cultures of Kupffer cells with small interfering RNA (siRNA) prevented the inhibitory effect of globular adiponectin (gAcrp) on LPS-stimulated TNF-alpha expression. gAcrp increased IL-10 mRNA and protein expression, as well as expression of the IL-10 inducible gene, HO-1; expression was higher in Kupffer cells from ethanol-fed rats compared with pair-fed controls. Although IL-10 receptor surface expression on Kupffer cells was not affected by ethanol feeding, IL-10-mediated phosphorylation of STAT3 and expression of HO-1 was higher in Kupffer cells after ethanol feeding. Inhibition of HO-1 activity, either by treatment with the HO-1 inhibitor zinc protoporphyrin or by siRNA knockdown of HO-1, prevented the inhibitory effect of gAcrp on LPS-stimulated TNF-alpha expression in Kupffer cells. LPS-stimulated TNF-alpha expression in liver was increased in mice after chronic ethanol exposure. When mice were treated with cobalt protoporphyrin to induce HO-1 expression, ethanol-induced sensitivity to LPS was ameliorated. Conclusion: gAcrp prevents LPS-stimulated TNF-alpha expression in Kupffer cells through the activation of the IL-10/STAT3/HO-1 pathway. Kupffer cells from ethanol-fed rats are highly sensitive to the anti-inflammatory effects of gAcrp; this sensitivity is associated with both increased expression and sensitivity to IL-10.
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Taurine supplementation prevents ethanol-induced decrease in serum adiponectin and reduces hepatic steatosis in rats.
Hepatology
PUBLISHED: 03-20-2009
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Chronic ethanol feeding decreases expression of adiponectin by adipocytes and circulating adiponectin. Adiponectin treatment during chronic ethanol feeding prevents liver injury in mice. Chronic ethanol feeding also increases oxidative and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in adipose tissue. Here we tested the hypothesis that supplemental taurine, an amino acid that functions as a chemical chaperone/osmolyte and enhances cellular antioxidant activity, would prevent ethanol-induced decreases in adiponectin expression and attenuate liver injury. Serum adiponectin concentrations decreased as early as 4 to 7 days after feeding rats a 36% ethanol diet. This rapid decrease was associated with increased oxidative, but not ER, stress in subcutaneous adipose tissue. Taurine prevented ethanol-induced oxidative stress and increased inflammatory cytokine expression in adipose tissue. Ethanol feeding also rapidly decreased expression of transcription factors regulating adiponectin expression (CCAAT/enhancer binding protein alpha; peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha/gamma) in subcutaneous adipose tissue. Taurine prevented the ethanol-induced decrease in CCAAT/enhancer binding protein alpha and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha, normalizing adiponectin messenger (m)RNA and serum adiponectin concentrations. In the liver, taurine prevented ethanol-induced oxidative stress and attenuated tumor necrosis factor alpha expression and steatosis, at least in part, by increasing expression of genes involved in fatty acid oxidation. Conclusion: In subcutaneous adipose tissue, taurine decreased ethanol-induced oxidative stress and cytokine expression, as well as normalized expression of adiponectin mRNA. Taurine prevented ethanol-induced decreases in serum adiponectin; normalized adiponectin was associated with a reduction in hepatic oxidative stress, tumor necrosis factor alpha expression, and steatosis. Taken together, these data demonstrate that taurine has important protective effects against ethanol-induced tissue injury in both adipose and liver tissue.
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Formation of gamma-ketoaldehyde-protein adducts during ethanol-induced liver injury in mice.
Free Radic. Biol. Med.
PUBLISHED: 03-05-2009
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Ethanol metabolism promotes the formation of a variety of reactive aldehydes in the liver. These aldehydes can rapidly form covalent protein adducts. Accumulating evidence indicates that these protein adducts may contribute to ethanol-mediated liver injury. Overproduction of gamma-ketoaldehydes, levuglandins (LGs) and isolevuglandins, is implicated in the pathogenesis of several chronic inflammatory diseases. gamma-Ketoaldehydes can form protein adducts orders of magnitude more quickly than 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE) or malondialdehyde. We hypothesized that ethanol-induced oxidative stress in vivo results in overproduction of LGE(2)- and iso[4]LGE(2)-protein adducts in mouse liver. Female C57BL/6 mice were allowed free access to an ethanol-containing diet for up to 39 days or pair-fed control diets. Pathological markers of ethanol-induced hepatic injury including serum alanine aminotransferase, hepatic triglyceride, and CYP2E1 were elevated in response to ethanol feeding. Ethanol-induced formation of iso[4]LGE(2)-, LGE(2)-, and 4-HNE-protein adducts in mouse liver was dependent on both dose and duration of ethanol feeding. Deficiency of cyclooxygenase 1 or 2 did not prevent ethanol-induced iso[4]LGE(2) or LGE(2) adducts in the liver, but adduct formation was reduced in both TNFR1- and CYP2E1-deficient mice. In summary, ethanol feeding enhanced gamma-ketoaldehyde-protein adduct production via a TNFR1/CYP2E1-dependent, but cyclooxygenase-independent, mechanism in mouse liver.
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An early complement-dependent and TLR-4-independent phase in the pathogenesis of ethanol-induced liver injury in mice.
Hepatology
PUBLISHED: 01-13-2009
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The innate immune system has been implicated in the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver disease. Although innate immunity is usually considered an early response to injury, previous work implicating innate immunity in ethanol-induced liver injury focuses primarily on long-term ethanol exposure. We investigated the early period of ethanol exposure to determine whether there were temporal associations between activation of innate immune responses and known correlates of liver injury. Female C57BL/6 mice were allowed free access to an ethanol-containing Lieber-DeCarli diet or were pair-fed a control diet. Within 4 days of ethanol exposure, we observed a striking spike in expression of hepatic proinflammatory cytokines-including tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), interleukin-6, and interferon-gamma-prior to hepatic triglyceride accumulation or increased plasma alanine aminotransferase activities, as well as before the induction of cytochrome P450 2E1 or oxidative stress. This early spike in inflammatory cytokines coincided with deposition of C3b-iC3b/C3c (C3b) in the liver. This deposition, resulting from the cleavage of the third component of the complement system (C3), is evidence for activation of complement in response to ethanol. C3(-/-) mice were protected from the early, ethanol-induced increase in hepatic TNF-alpha expression. Ethanol increased C3b deposition in mice deficient in C3a receptor or C5a receptor, as well as in wild-type mice depleted of hepatic macrophages; however, there was no increase in hepatic TNF-alpha in the absence of C3a receptor, C5a receptor, or hepatic macrophages. In contrast, the absence of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR-4) had no effect on the early, ethanol-induced increase in either C3b or TNF-alpha.
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Inhibition of apoptosis protects mice from ethanol-mediated acceleration of early markers of CCl4 -induced fibrosis but not steatosis or inflammation.
Alcohol. Clin. Exp. Res.
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Correlative evidence indicates that apoptosis is associated with the progression of alcoholic liver disease. If apoptosis contributes to ethanol (EtOH)-induced steatohepatitis and/or fibrosis, then mice deficient in Bid, a key pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 family member, or mice treated with a pan-caspase inhibitor (VX166) should be resistant to EtOH-induced liver injury.
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