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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
ERK5/KLF4 signaling as a common mediator of the neuroprotective effects of both nerve growth factor and hydrogen peroxide preconditioning.
Age (Dordr)
PUBLISHED: 06-26-2014
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Oxidative stress has long been implicated in the pathogenesis of various neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease and stroke. While high levels of oxidative stress are generally associated with cell death, a slight rise of reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels can be protective by "preconditioning" cells to develop a resistance against subsequent challenges. However, the mechanisms underlying such preconditioning (PC)-induced protection are still poorly understood. Previous studies have supported a role of ERK5 (mitogen-activated protein [MAP] kinase 5) in neuroprotection and ischemic tolerance in the hippocampus. In agreement with these findings, our data suggest that ERK5 mediates both hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced PC as well as nerve growth factor (NGF)-induced neuroprotection. Activation of ERK5 partially rescued pheochromocytoma PC12 cells as well as primary hippocampal neurons from H2O2-caused death, while inhibition of ERK5 abolished NGF or PC-induced protection. These results implicate ERK5 signaling as a common downstream pathway for NGF and PC. Furthermore, both NGF and PC increased the expression of the transcription factor, KLF4, which can initiate an anti-apoptotic response in various cell types. Induction of KLF4 by NGF or PC was blocked by siERK5, suggesting that ERK5 is required in this process. siKLF4 can also attenuate NGF- or PC-induced neuroprotection. Overexpression of active MEK5 or KLF4 in H2O2-stressed cells increased Bcl-2/Bax ratio and the expression of NAIP (neuronal apoptosis inhibitory protein). Taken together, our data suggest that ERK5/KLF4 cascade is a common signaling pathway shared by at least two important mechanisms by which neurons can be protected from cell death.
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Total cholesterol and neuropsychiatric symptoms in Alzheimer's disease: the impact of total cholesterol level and gender.
Dement Geriatr Cogn Disord
PUBLISHED: 03-04-2014
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Neuropsychiatric symptoms (NPS) in Alzheimer's disease (AD) are a major factor in nursing home placement and a primary cause of stress for caregivers. Elevated cholesterol has been linked to psychiatric disorders and has been shown to be a risk factor for AD and to impact disease progression. The present study investigated the relationship between cholesterol and NPS in AD.
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The impact of APOE status on relationship of biomarkers of vascular risk and systemic inflammation to neuropsychiatric symptoms in Alzheimer's disease.
J. Alzheimers Dis.
PUBLISHED: 03-01-2014
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Research on the link between APOE?4 and neuropsychiatric symptoms (NPS) in Alzheimer's disease (AD) has been inconsistent. Previous work has shown a relationship between serum biomarkers of vascular risk and inflammation and NPS in AD. The current study investigated the impact of APOE?4 status on the relationship between biomarkers of cardiovascular risk, systemic inflammation, and NPS. The sample was drawn from the TARCC Longitudinal Research Cohort; the final sample of 190 consisted of 124 females and 66 males meeting the diagnostic criteria for mild to moderate AD. 115 individuals were APOE?4 carriers and 75 were non-carriers. Serum-based clinical biomarkers of vascular risk and biomarkers of inflammation related to AD were analyzed. NPS data was gathered from caretakers/family members using the Neuropsychiatric Inventory. The significant biomarkers differed for carriers and non-carriers with IL15 being a negative biomarker of total NPS accounting for 12% of the variance for carriers and IL18 and TNF? negative predictors for non-carriers (18% of variance). Patterns related to specific symptoms were similar. Stratification by gender revealed significant biomarkers of total NPS for female carriers were negative IL15 and IL1ra (18% of variance) and for female non-carriers were negative IL18 and positive homocysteine. Total cholesterol was a positive biomarker of total NPS for both male carriers (36% of variance) and non-carriers (negative TNF? and total cholesterol, 32% of variance). These findings suggest that dysregulation of inflammatory activity is related to NPS, that cholesterol is a significant factor in the occurrence of NPS, and that gender and APOE status need to be considered.
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Oxidative stress, testosterone, and cognition among Caucasian and Mexican-American men with and without Alzheimer's disease.
J. Alzheimers Dis.
PUBLISHED: 02-06-2014
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The use of testosterone among aging men has been increasing, but results from studies addressing the effectiveness of testosterone replacement therapy have been equivocal.
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The Association of Free Testosterone Levels in Men and Lifestyle Factors and Chronic Disease Status: A North Texas Healthy Heart Study.
J Prim Care Community Health
PUBLISHED: 01-26-2014
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Hypogonadism is highly prevalent in men older than 45 years and is associated with an increased risk of chronic diseases, including obesity, metabolic syndrome, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. The objective of this study was to determine whether lifestyle factors such as smoking, diet, and exercise are associated with reduced testosterone levels.
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Sex differences in cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease.
Front Neuroendocrinol
PUBLISHED: 01-06-2014
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Studies have shown differences in specific cognitive ability domains and risk of Alzheimer's disease between the men and women at later age. However it is important to know that sex differences in cognitive function during adulthood may have their basis in both organizational effects, i.e., occurring as early as during the neuronal development period, as well as in activational effects, where the influence of the sex steroids influence brain function in adulthood. Further, the rate of cognitive decline with aging is also different between the sexes. Understanding the biology of sex differences in cognitive function will not only provide insight into Alzheimer's disease prevention, but also is integral to the development of personalized, gender-specific medicine. This review draws on epidemiological, translational, clinical, and basic science studies to assess the impact of sex differences in cognitive function from young to old, and examines the effects of sex hormone treatments on Alzheimer's disease in men and women.
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Oxidative stress defines the neuroprotective or neurotoxic properties of androgens in immortalized female rat dopaminergic neuronal cells.
Endocrinology
PUBLISHED: 08-19-2013
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Males have a higher risk for developing Parkinsons disease and parkinsonism after ischemic stroke than females. Although estrogens have been shown to play a neuroprotective role in Parkinsons disease, there is little information on androgens actions on dopamine neurons. In this study, we examined the effects of androgens under conditions of oxidative stress to determine whether androgens play a neuroprotective or neurotoxic role in dopamine neuronal function. Mitochondrial function, cell viability, intracellular calcium levels, and mitochondrial calcium influx were examined in response to androgens under both nonoxidative and oxidative stress conditions. Briefly, N27 dopaminergic cells were exposed to the oxidative stressor, hydrogen peroxide, and physiologically relevant levels of testosterone or dihydrotestosterone, applied either before or after oxidative stress exposure. Androgens, alone, increased mitochondrial function via a calcium-dependent mechanism. Androgen pretreatment protected cells from oxidative stress-induced cell death. However, treatment with androgens after the oxidative insult increased cell death, and these effects were, in part, mediated by calcium influx into the mitochondria. Interestingly, the negative effects of androgens were not blocked by either androgen or estrogen receptor antagonists. Instead, a putative membrane-associated androgen receptor was implicated. Overall, our results indicate that androgens are neuroprotective when oxidative stress levels are minimal, but when oxidative stress levels are elevated, androgens exacerbate oxidative stress damage.
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Progesterone-induced neuroprotection: factors that may predict therapeutic efficacy.
Brain Res.
PUBLISHED: 01-15-2013
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Both progesterone and estradiol have well-described neuroprotective effects against numerous insults in a variety of cell culture models, animal models and in humans. However, the efficacy of these hormones may depend on a variety of factors, including the type of hormone used (ex. progesterone versus medroxyprogesterone acetate), the duration of the postmenopausal period prior to initiating the hormone intervention, and potentially, the age of the subject. The latter two factors relate to the proposed existence of a "window of therapeutic opportunity" for steroid hormones in the brain. While such a window of opportunity has been described for estrogen, there is a paucity of information to address whether such a window of opportunity exists for progesterone and its related progestins. Here, we review known cellular mechanisms likely to underlie the protective effects of progesterone and furthermore, describe key differences in the neurobiology of progesterone and the synthetic progestin, medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA). Based on the latter, we offer a model that defines some of the key cellular and molecular players that predict the neuroprotective efficacy of progesterone. Accordingly, we suggest how changes in the expression or function of these cellular and molecular targets of progesterone with age or prolonged duration of hormone withdrawal (such as following surgical or natural menopause) may impact the efficacy of progesterone. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Hormone Therapy.
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Non-genomic mechanisms of progesterone action in the brain.
Front Neurosci
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2013
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Progesterone is a gonadal steroid hormone whose physiological effects extend well beyond the strict confines of reproductive function. In fact, progesterone can have important effects on a variety of tissues, including the bone, the heart and the brain. Mechanistically, progesterone has been thought to exert its effects through the progesterone receptor (PR), a member of the nuclear steroid hormone superfamily, and as such, acts through specific progesterone response elements (PRE) within the promoter region of target genes to regulate transcription of such genes. This has been often described as the "genomic" mechanism of progesterone action. However, just as progesterone has a diverse range of tissue targets, the mechanisms through which progesterone elicits its effects are equally diverse. For example, progesterone can activate alternative receptors, such as membrane-associated PRs (distinct from the classical PR), to elicit the activation of several signaling pathways that in turn, can influence cell function. Here, we review various non-nuclear (i.e., non-genomic) signaling mechanisms that progesterone can recruit to elicit its effects, focusing our discussion primarily on those signaling mechanisms by which progesterone influences cell viability in the brain.
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Is serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor related to craving for or use of alcohol, cocaine, or methamphetamine?
Neuropsychiatr Dis Treat
PUBLISHED: 06-21-2011
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Data suggests that brain-derived neurotropic factor (BDNF) plays a neuroadaptive role in addiction. Whether serum BDNF levels are different in alcohol or psychostimulants as a function of craving is unknown. Here, we examined craving and serum BDNF levels in persons with alcohol versus psychostimulant dependence. Our goals were to explore BDNF as an objective biomarker for 1) craving 2) abstinence, and 3) years of chronic substance use.
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Androgens exacerbate motor asymmetry in male rats with unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine lesion.
Horm Behav
PUBLISHED: 06-15-2011
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Parkinsons disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by dopamine neuron loss in the nigrostriatal pathway that shows greater incidence in men than women. The mechanisms underlying this gender bias remain elusive, although one possibility is that androgens may increase dopamine neuronal vulnerability to oxidative stress. Motor impairment can be modeled in rats receiving a unilateral injection of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA), a neurotoxin producing nigrostriatal degeneration. To investigate the role of androgens in PD, we compared young (2 months) and aged (24 months) male rats receiving gonadectomy (GDX) and their corresponding intact controls. One month after GDX, rats were unilaterally injected with 6-OHDA, and their motor impairment and asymmetry were assessed 2 weeks later using the cylinder test and the amphetamine-induced rotation test. Plasma samples were also collected to assess the concentration of testosterone and advanced oxidation protein products, a product of oxidative stress. GDX decreased lesion-induced asymmetry along with oxidative stress and increased amphetamine-induced rotations. These results show that GDX improves motor behaviors by decreasing motor asymmetry in 6-OHDA-treated rats, an effect that may be ascribed to increased release of striatal dopamine and decreased oxidative stress. Collectively, the data support the hypothesis that androgens may underlie the gender bias observed in PD.
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ERK1/2 and ERK5 have distinct roles in the regulation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression.
J. Neurosci. Res.
PUBLISHED: 04-05-2011
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Neurotrophins play essential roles in the development, differentiation, and survival of neuronal and nonneuronal cells. Alterations in neurotrophin expression have been implicated in a variety of neurodegenerative disorders. Dysregulation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has been implicated in deficits of long-term potentiation and cognition and may contribute to the development of Alzheimers disease (AD). In this study, we used complementary pharmacological and molecular approaches to evaluate the role of ERK1/2 and ERK5, two members of the MAPK pathway associated with neuroprotection, in regulating BDNF expression in C6 glial cells and primary astrocytes. Our data revealed that U0126, an inhibitor of both ERK5 and ERK1/2, increased the levels of BDNF mRNA, whereas the MEK1/2-specific inhibitor PD184352 did not, suggesting that ERK5 exerts negative control over BDNF expression. This was supported by experiments in which RNAi-mediated depletion of ERK5 led to an increase in BDNF. In contrast, transfection with constitutively active MEK5 resulted in an inhibition of BDNF expression, confirming the inhibitory role of ERK5 in the regulation of BDNF. Interestingly, transfection with the dominant active mutant of MEK1 (MEKR4F), the upstream activator of ERK1/2, resulted in a modest increase in BDNF levels. Collectively, our data suggest that ERK5 and ERK1/2 exert opposite effects on BDNF expression and support the hypothesis that an imbalance of these two signaling pathways may contribute to the pathology of diseases in which neurotrophin dysregulation is noted.
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Genistein directly inhibits native and recombinant NMDA receptors.
Neuropharmacology
PUBLISHED: 02-22-2010
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The protein tyrosine kinase (PTK) inhibitor genistein has been widely used to examine potential effects of tyrosine phosphorylation on neurotransmitter function. We report here that genistein inhibits N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors through a direct effect. Whole-cell NMDA-activated current was recorded in native receptors from mouse hippocampal slice culture and rat recombinant NR1aNR2A and NR1aNR2B receptors transiently expressed in HEK293 cells. Extracellular application of genistein and NMDA reversibly inhibited NMDA-activated current. The inhibition of NMDA-activated current by genistein applied externally was not affected when genistein was also pre-equilibrated in the intracellular solution. Daidzein, an analog of genistein that does not block PTK, also inhibited NMDA-activated current. Coapplication of lavendustin A, a specific inhibitor of PTK, had no effect on the NMDA response. Moreover, genistein-induced inhibition of NMDA-activated current displayed concentration- and voltage-dependence. Our results demonstrate that genistein has a direct inhibitory effect on NMDA receptors that is not mediated via inhibition of tyrosine kinase. Thus, other PTK inhibitors may be more suitable for studying involvement of PTKs in NMDA receptor-mediated events.
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The potential for estrogens in preventing Alzheimers disease and vascular dementia.
Ther Adv Neurol Disord
PUBLISHED: 11-06-2009
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Estrogens are the best-studied class of drugs for potential use in the prevention of Alzheimers disease (AD). These steroids have been shown to be potent neuroprotectants both in vitro and in vivo, and to exert effects that are consistent with their potential use in prevention of AD. These include the prevention of the processing of amyloid precursor protein (APP) into beta-amyloid (Aß), the reduction in tau hyperphosphorylation, and the elimination of catastrophic attempts at neuronal mitosis. Further, epidemiological data support the efficacy of early postmenopausal use of estrogens for the delay or prevention of AD. Collectively, this evidence supports the further development of estrogen-like compounds for prevention of AD. Several approaches to enhance brain specificity of estrogen action are now underway in an attempt to reduce the side effects of chronic estrogen therapy in AD.
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Progesterone potentiates calcium release through IP3 receptors by an Akt-mediated mechanism in hippocampal neurons.
Cell Calcium
PUBLISHED: 04-16-2009
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Progesterone (P4) is a steroid hormone that plays multiple roles in the central nervous system (CNS) including promoting neuroprotection. However, the precise mechanisms involved in its neuroprotective effects are still unknown. Given that the regulation of the intracellular calcium (Ca(2+)) concentration is critical for cell survival, we determined if inositol 1, 4, 5-trisphosphate receptors (IP(3)Rs) are relevant targets of P4. Using primary hippocampal neurons, we tested the hypothesis that P4 controls the gain of IP3R-mediated intracellular Ca(2+) signaling in neurons and characterized the subcellular distribution and phosphorylation of potential signaling intermediates involved in P4s actions. Our results reveal that P4 treatment altered the intensity and distribution of IP3R immunoreactivity and induced the nuclear translocation of phosphorylated Akt. Further, P4 potentiated IP(3)R-mediated intracellular Ca(2+) responses. These results suggest a potential involvement of P4 in particular and of steroid hormone signaling pathways in general in the control of intracellular Ca(2+) signaling and its related functions.
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The differences in neuroprotective efficacy of progesterone and medroxyprogesterone acetate correlate with their effects on brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression.
Endocrinology
PUBLISHED: 03-26-2009
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Whereas hormone therapy is used for the treatment of menopausal symptoms, its efficacy in helping reduce the risk of other diseases such as Alzheimers disease has been questioned in view of the results of recent clinical trials that appeared inconsistent with numerous basic research studies that supported the beneficial effects of hormones. One possible explanation of this discrepancy may lie in the choice of hormone used. For example, we and others found that progesterone is neuroprotective whereas medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA), the synthetic progestin used in hormone therapy, is not. Because our data suggest that progesterone-induced protection is associated with the induction of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels and, importantly, can be blocked by inhibiting the neurotrophin signaling, we determined whether progesterone and medroxyprogesterone acetate differed in their ability to regulate BDNF levels in the explants of the cerebral cortex. We found that progesterone elicited an increase in both BDNF mRNA and protein levels, whereas medroxyprogesterone acetate did not. Furthermore, using both a pharmacological inhibitor of the progesterone receptor (PR) and PR knockout mice, we determined that the effects of progesterone were mediated by the classical PR. Our results underscore the fact that not all progestins have equivalent effects on the brain and suggest that the selection of the appropriate progestin may influence the success of hormone therapy formulations used in treating the menopause and/or reducing the risk for diseases associated with the postmenopausal period.
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Cell Models for the Study of Sex Steroid Hormone Neurobiology.
J Steroids Horm Sci
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To date many aspects of neurons and glia biology remain elusive, due in part to the cellular and molecular complexity of the brain. In recent decades, cell models from different brain areas have been established and proven invaluable toward understanding this complexity. In the field of steroid hormone neurobiology, an important question is: what is the profile of steroid hormone receptor expression in these specific cell lines? Currently, a clear summary of such receptor profiling is lacking. For this reason, we summarized in this review the expression of estrogen, progesterone, and androgen receptors in several widely used cell lines (glial and neuronal) derived from the forebrain and midbrain, based on our own data and that from the literature. Such information will aid in the selection of specific cell lines used to test hypotheses related to the biology of estrogens, progestins, and/or androgens.
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Progesterone increases the release of brain-derived neurotrophic factor from glia via progesterone receptor membrane component 1 (Pgrmc1)-dependent ERK5 signaling.
Endocrinology
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Progesterone (P4) is cytoprotective in various experimental models, but our understanding of the mechanisms involved is still incomplete. Our laboratory has implicated brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) signaling as an important mediator of P4s protective actions. We have shown that P4 increases the expression of BDNF, an effect mediated by the classical P4 receptor (PR), and that the protective effects of P4 were abolished using inhibitors of Trk receptor signaling. In an effort to extend our understanding of the interrelationship between P4 and BDNF signaling, we determined whether P4 influenced BDNF release and examined the role of the classical PR and a putative membrane PR, progesterone receptor membrane component-1 (Pgrmc1), as mediators of this response. Given recent data from our laboratory that supported the role of ERK5 in BDNF release, we also tested whether P4-induced BDNF release was mediated by ERK5. In this study, we found that P4 and the membrane-impermeable P4 (P4-BSA) both induced BDNF release from cultured C6 glial cells and primary astrocytes. Both these cells lack the classical nuclear/intracellular PR but express high levels of membrane-associated PR, including Pgrmc1. Using RNA interference-mediated knockdown of Pgrmc1 expression, we determined that P4-induced BDNF release was dependent on the expression of Pgrmc1, although pharmacological inhibition of the PR failed to alter the effects of P4. Furthermore, the BDNF release elicited by P4 was mediated by ERK5, and not ERK1/2. Collectively, our data describe that P4 elicits an increase in BDNF release from glia via a Pgrmc1-induced ERK5 signaling mechanism and identify Pgrmc1 as a potential therapeutic target for future hormone-based drug development for the treatment of such degenerative diseases as Alzheimers disease as well as other diseases wherein neurotrophin dysregulation is noted.
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Progesterone and neuroprotection.
Horm Behav
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Numerous studies aimed at identifying the role of estrogen on the brain have used the ovariectomized rodent as the experimental model. And while estrogen intervention in these animals has, at least partially, restored cholinergic, neurotrophin and cognitive deficits seen in the ovariectomized animal, it is worth considering that the removal of the ovaries results in the loss of not only circulating estrogen but of circulating progesterone as well. As such, the various deficits associated with ovariectomy may be attributed to the loss of progesterone as well. Similarly, one must also consider the fact that the human menopause results in the precipitous decline of not just circulating estrogens, but in circulating progesterone as well and as such, the increased risk for diseases such as Alzheimers disease during the postmenopausal period could also be contributed by this loss of progesterone. In fact, progesterone has been shown to exert neuroprotective effects, both in cell models, animal models and in humans. Here, we review the evidence that supports the neuroprotective effects of progesterone and discuss the various mechanisms that are thought to mediate these protective effects. We also discuss the receptor pharmacology of progesterones neuroprotective effects and present a conceptual model of progesterone action that supports the complementary effects of membrane-associated and classical intracellular progesterone receptors. In addition, we discuss fundamental differences in the neurobiology of progesterone and the clinically used, synthetic progestin, medroxyprogesterone acetate that may offer an explanation for the negative findings of the combined estrogen/progestin arm of the Womens Health Initiative-Memory Study (WHIMS) and suggest that the type of progestin used may dictate the outcome of either pre-clinical or clinical studies that addresses brain function.
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Neuroprotection and estrogen receptors.
Neuroendocrinology
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This review is intended to assess the state of current knowledge on the role of estrogen receptors (ERs) in the neuroprotective effects of estrogens in models for acute neuronal injury and death. We evaluate the overall evidence that estrogens are neuroprotective in acute injury and critically assess the role of ER?, ER?, GPR 30, and nonreceptor-mediated mechanisms in these robust neuroprotective effects of this ovarian steroid hormone. We conclude that all three receptors, as well as nonreceptor-mediated mechanisms can be involved in neuroprotection, depending on the model used, the level of estrogen administrated, and the mode of administration of the steroid. Also, the signaling pathways used by both ER-dependent and ER-independent mechanisms to exert neuroprotection are considered. Finally, further studies that are needed to parse out the relative contribution of receptor versus nonreceptor-mediated signaling are discussed.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

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We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.