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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Secondary organic aerosol formation during evaporation of droplets containing atmospheric aldehydes, amines, and ammonium sulfate.
Environ. Sci. Technol.
PUBLISHED: 11-20-2014
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Reactions of carbonyl compounds in cloudwater produce organic aerosol mass through in-cloud oxidation and during post-cloud evaporation. In this work, post-cloud evaporation was simulated in laboratory experiments on evaporating droplets that contain mixtures of common atmospheric aldehydes with ammonium sulfate (AS), methylamine, or glycine. Aerosol diameters were measured during monodisperse droplet drying experiments and during polydisperse droplet equilibration experiments at 75% relative humidity, and condensed-phase mass was measured in bulk thermogravimetric experiments. The evaporation of water from a droplet was found to trigger aldehyde reactions that increased residual particle volumes by a similar extent in room-temperature experiments, regardless of whether AS, methylamine, or glycine was present. The production of organic aerosol volume was highest from droplets containing glyoxal, followed by similar production from methylglyoxal or hydroxyacetone. Significant organic aerosol production was observed for glycolaldehyde, acetaldehyde, and formaldehyde only at elevated temperatures in thermogravimetric experiments. In many experiments, the amount of aerosol produced was greater than the sum of all solutes plus non-volatile solvent impurities, indicating the additional presence of trapped water, likely caused by increasing aerosol-phase viscosity due to oligomer formation.
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Maternal Influenza Immunization and Birth Outcomes of Stillbirth and Spontaneous Abortion: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.
Clin. Infect. Dis.
PUBLISHED: 11-20-2014
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Despite strong evidence that maternal influenza vaccination during pregnancy is safe, uptake of influenza vaccination during pregnancy remains low. We identified studies that assessed outcomes of stillbirth or spontaneous abortion after administration of influenza vaccine during pregnancy. We conducted a literature search in November 2013 that yielded 447 total citations. After removal of duplicates and studies deemed not relevant based on the title and abstract, 36 records underwent a full text review and 7 studies were included in the final review. Where possible, adjusted results were included in the meta-analysis. Women in the influenza vaccine group had a lower likelihood of stillbirth (RR: 0.73 (0.55, 0.96)); this association was similar when restricted to the H1N1pdm09 vaccine (RR: 0.69 (0.53, 0.90)). The pooled estimate for spontaneous abortion was not significant (RR: 0.91 (0.68, 1.22)). These analyses add to the evidence base for the safety of influenza vaccination in pregnancy.
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Understanding and overcoming shear alignment of fibers during extrusion.
Soft Matter
PUBLISHED: 11-20-2014
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Fiber alignment is the defining architectural characteristic of discontinuous fiber composites and is dictated by shear-dominated processing techniques including flow-injection molding, tape-casting, and mold-casting. However, recent colloidal assembly techniques have started to employ additional forces in fiber suspensions that have the potential to change the energy landscape of the shear-dominated alignment in conditions of flow. In this paper, we develop an energetics model to characterize the shear-alignment of rigid fibers under different flow conditions in the presence of magnetic colloidal alignment forces. We find that these colloidal forces can be sufficient to manipulate the energetic landscape and obtain tunable fiber alignment during flow within even small geometries, such as capillary flow. In most conditions, these colloidal forces work to freeze the fiber orientation during flow and prevent the structure disrupting phenomenon of Jeffrey's orbits that has been accepted to rule fiber suspensions under simple shear flow.
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Early Intervention for Preterm Infants and Their Mothers: A Systematic Review.
J Perinat Neonatal Nurs
PUBLISHED: 11-20-2014
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This systematic review evaluates the efficacy of various early interventions on maternal emotional outcomes, mother-infant interaction, and subsequent infant outcomes during neonatal intensive care unit admission and postdischarge. Key interventions associated with outcomes in both the neonatal intensive care unit and postdischarge (ie, home) settings are summarized. A comprehensive search of peer-reviewed randomized controlled trials involving early interventions for infants and their mother published between 1993 and 2013 in the electronic databases PubMed, CINAHL, EMBASE, PsychINFO, and Cochrane was undertaken. Methodological quality was assessed using the PEDro scale to evaluate internal and external validity of the study. Twelve randomized controlled trials were included in the review, and all used some form of parenting education. The interventions had limited effects on maternal stress and mother-infant interaction and positive effects on maternal anxiety, depressive symptoms, and maternal coping. There were positive effects on infants' short-term outcomes for length of stay and breast-feeding rate. Positive and clinically meaningful effects of early interventions were seen in some physiological/psychological outcomes of mothers and preterm infants. It is important for nurses to foster close mother-infant contact and increase maternal competence during and after the infant's hospitalization period.
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Toxoplasma gondii Dissemination: A Parasite's Journey through the Infected Host.
Parasite Immunol.
PUBLISHED: 11-20-2014
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T. gondii is a highly successful global pathogen that is remarkable in its ability to infect nearly any nucleated cell in any warm-blooded animal. Infection with T. gondii typically occurs through the ingestion of contaminated food or water, but the parasite then breaches the intestinal epithelial barrier and spreads from the lamina propria to a large variety of other organs in the body. A key feature of T. gondii pathogenesis is the parasite's ability to cross formidable biological barriers in the infected host and enter tissues such as the brain, eye, and placenta. The dissemination of T. gondii into these organs underlies the severe disease that accompanies human toxoplasmosis. In this review we will focus on seminal studies as well as exciting recent findings that have shaped our current understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which T. gondii journeys throughout the host and enters the vital organs to cause disease. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
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Fine-mapping of the HNF1B multicancer locus identifies candidate variants that mediate endometrial cancer risk.
Jodie N Painter, Tracy A O'Mara, Jyotsna Batra, Timothy Cheng, Felicity A Lose, Joe Dennis, Kyriaki Michailidou, Jonathan P Tyrer, Shahana Ahmed, Kaltin Ferguson, Catherine S Healey, Susanne Kaufmann, Kristine M Hillman, Carina Walpole, Leire Moya, Pamela Pollock, Angela Jones, Kimberley Howarth, Lynn Martin, Maggie Gorman, Shirley Hodgson, , Ma Magdalena Echeverry de Polanco, Monica Sans, Angel Carracedo, Sergi Castellvi-Bel, Augusto Rojas-Martinez, Erika Santos, Manuel R Teixeira, Luis Carvajal-Carmona, Xiao-Ou Shu, Jirong Long, Wei Zheng, Yong-Bing Xiang, Grant W Montgomery, Penelope M Webb, Rodney J Scott, Mark McEvoy, John Attia, Elizabeth Holliday, Nicholas G Martin, Dale R Nyholt, Anjali K Henders, Peter A Fasching, Alexander Hein, Matthias W Beckmann, Stefan P Renner, Thilo Dörk, Peter Hillemanns, Matthias Dürst, Ingo Runnebaum, Diether Lambrechts, Lieve Coenegrachts, Stefanie Schrauwen, Frédéric Amant, Boris Winterhoff, Sean C Dowdy, Ellen L Goode, Attila Teoman, Helga B Salvesen, Jone Trovik, Tormund S Njolstad, Henrica M J Werner, Katie Ashton, Tony Proietto, Geoffrey Otton, Gerasimos Tzortzatos, Miriam Mints, Emma Tham, Per Hall, Kamila Czene, Jianjun Liu, Jingmei Li, John L Hopper, Melissa C Southey, Arif B Ekici, Matthias Ruebner, Nicola Johnson, Julian Peto, Barbara Burwinkel, Frederik Marme, Hermann Brenner, Aida K Dieffenbach, Alfons Meindl, Hiltrud Brauch, Annika Lindblom, Jeroen Depreeuw, Matthieu Moisse, Jenny Chang-Claude, Anja Rudolph, Fergus J Couch, Janet E Olson, Graham G Giles, Fiona Bruinsma, Julie M Cunningham, Brooke L Fridley, Anne-Lise Børresen-Dale, Vessela N Kristensen, Angela Cox, Anthony J Swerdlow, Nicholas Orr, Manjeet K Bolla, Qin Wang, Rachel Palmieri Weber, Zhihua Chen, Mitul Shah, Juliet D French, Paul D P Pharoah, Alison M Dunning, Ian Tomlinson, Douglas F Easton, Stacey L Edwards, Deborah J Thompson, Amanda B Spurdle.
Hum. Mol. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 11-08-2014
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Common variants in the hepatocyte nuclear factor 1 homeobox B (HNF1B) gene are associated with the risk of type II diabetes and multiple cancers. Evidence to date indicates that cancer risk may be mediated via genetic or epigenetic effects on HNF1B gene expression. We previously found single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at the HNF1B locus to be associated with endometrial cancer, and now report extensive fine-mapping and in silico and laboratory analyses of this locus. Analysis of 1,184 genotyped and imputed SNPs in 6,608 Caucasian cases and 37,925 controls, and 895 Asian cases and 1,968 controls, revealed the best signal of association for SNP rs11263763 (P=8.4×10(-14), OR=0.86, 95% CI=0.82-0.89), located within HNF1B intron 1. Haplotype analysis and conditional analyses provide no evidence of further independent endometrial cancer risk variants at this locus. SNP rs11263763 genotype was associated with HNF1B mRNA expression but not with HNF1B methylation in endometrial tumour samples from The Cancer Genome Atlas. Genetic analyses prioritized rs11263763 and four other SNPs in high to moderate LD as the most likely causal SNPs. Three of these SNPs map to the extended HNF1B promoter based on chromatin marks extending from the minimal promoter region. Reporter assays demonstrated that this extended region reduces activity in combination with the minimal HNF1B promoter, and that the minor alleles of rs11263763 or rs8064454 are associated with decreased HNF1B promoter activity. Our findings provide evidence for a single signal associated with endometrial cancer risk at the HNF1B locus, and that risk is likely mediated via altered HNF1B gene expression.
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Candidate genetic modifiers for breast and ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers.
Paolo Peterlongo, Jenny Chang-Claude, Kirsten B Moysich, Anja Rudolph, Rita K Schmutzler, Jacques Simard, Penny Soucy, Rosalind A Eeles, Douglas F Easton, Ute Hamann, Stefan Wilkening, Bowang Chen, Matti A Rookus, Marjanka K Schmidt, Frederieke H van der Baan, Amanda B Spurdle, Logan C Walker, Felicity Lose, Ana-Teresa Maia, Marco Montagna, Laura Matricardi, Jan Lubiński, Anna Jakubowska, Encarna B Gomez-Garcia, Olufunmilayo I Olopade, Robert L Nussbaum, Katherine L Nathanson, Susan M Domchek, Timothy R Rebbeck, Banu K Arun, Beth Y Karlan, Sandra Orsulic, Jenny Lester, Wendy K Chung, Alex Miron, Melissa C Southey, David E Goldgar, Saundra S Buys, Ramunas Janavicius, Cecelia M Dorfling, Elizabeth J van Rensburg, Yuan Chun Ding, Susan L Neuhausen, Thomas V O Hansen, Anne-Marie Gerdes, Bent Ejlertsen, Lars Jønson, Ana Osorio, Cristina Martinez-Bouzas, Javier Benitez, Edye E Conway, Kathleen R Blazer, Jeffrey N Weitzel, Siranoush Manoukian, Bernard Peissel, Daniela Zaffaroni, Giulietta Scuvera, Monica Barile, Filomena Ficarazzi, Frederique Mariette, Stefano Fortuzzi, Alessandra Viel, Giuseppe Giannini, Laura Papi, Aline Martayan, Maria Grazia Tibiletti, Paolo Radice, Athanassios Vratimos, Florentia Fostira, Judy E Garber, Alan Donaldson, Carole Brewer, Claire Foo, D Gareth R Evans, Debra Frost, Diana Eccles, Angela Brady, Jackie Cook, Marc Tischkowitz, Julian Adlard, Julian Barwell, Lisa Walker, Louise Izatt, Lucy E Side, M John Kennedy, Mark T Rogers, Mary E Porteous, Patrick J Morrison, Radka Platte, Rosemarie Davidson, Shirley V Hodgson, Steve Ellis, Trevor Cole, Andrew K Godwin, Kathleen Claes, Tom Van Maerken, Alfons Meindl, Andrea Gehrig, Christian Sutter, Christoph Engel, Dieter Niederacher, Doris Steinemann, Hansjoerg Plendl, Karin Kast, Kerstin Rhiem, Nina Ditsch, Norbert Arnold, Raymonda Varon-Mateeva, Barbara Wappenschmidt, Shan Wang-Gohrke, Brigitte Bressac-de Paillerets, Bruno Buecher, Capucine Delnatte, Claude Houdayer, Dominique Stoppa-Lyonnet, Francesca Damiola, Isabelle Coupier, Laure Barjhoux, Laurence Venat-Bouvet, Lisa Golmard, Nadia Boutry-Kryza, Olga M Sinilnikova, Olivier Caron, Pascal Pujol, Sylvie Mazoyer, Muriel Belotti, Marion Piedmonte, Michael L Friedlander, Gustavo C Rodriguez, Larry J Copeland, Miguel de la Hoya, Pedro Perez Segura, Heli Nevanlinna, Kristiina Aittomäki, Theo A M van Os, Hanne E J Meijers-Heijboer, Annemarie H Van der Hout, Maaike P G Vreeswijk, Nicoline Hoogerbrugge, Margreet G E M Ausems, Helena C Van Doorn, J Margriet Collée, Edith Olah, Orland Díez, Ignacio Blanco, Conxi Lazaro, Joan Brunet, Lídia Feliubadaló, Cezary Cybulski, Jacek Gronwald, Katarzyna Durda, Katarzyna Jaworska-Bieniek, Grzegorz Sukiennicki, Adalgeir Arason, Jocelyne Chiquette, Manuel R Teixeira, Curtis Olswold, Fergus J Couch, Noralane M Lindor, Xianshu Wang, Csilla I Szabo, Kenneth Offit, Marina Corines, Lauren Jacobs, Mark Robson, Liying Zhang, Vijai Joseph, Andreas Berger, Christian F Singer, Christine Rappaport, Daphne Geschwantler Kaulich, Georg Pfeiler, Muy-Kheng M Tea, Catherine M Phelan, Mark H Greene, Phuong L Mai, Gad Rennert, Anna Marie Mulligan, Gord Glendon, Sandrine Tchatchou, Irene L Andrulis, Amanda Ewart Toland, Anders Bojesen, Inge Sokilde Pedersen, Mads Thomassen, Uffe Birk Jensen, Yael Laitman, Johanna Rantala, Anna von Wachenfeldt, Hans Ehrencrona, Marie Stenmark Askmalm, Ake Borg, Karoline B Kuchenbaecker, Lesley McGuffog, Daniel Barrowdale, Sue Healey, Andrew Lee, Paul D P Pharoah, Georgia Chenevix-Trench, Antonis C Antoniou, Eitan Friedman.
Cancer Epidemiol. Biomarkers Prev.
PUBLISHED: 10-23-2014
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Background: BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers are at substantially increased risk for developing breast and ovarian cancer. The incomplete penetrance coupled with the variable age at diagnosis in carriers of the same mutation suggests the existence of genetic and non-genetic modifying factors. In this study we evaluated the putative role of variants in many candidate modifier genes. Methods: Genotyping data from 15,252 BRCA1 and 8,211 BRCA2 mutation carriers, for known variants (n=3,248) located within or around 445 candidate genes, were available through the iCOGS custom-designed array. Breast and ovarian cancer association analysis was performed within a retrospective cohort approach. Results: The observed p-values of association ranged between 0.005-1.000. None of the variants was significantly associated with breast or ovarian cancer risk in either BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers, after multiple testing adjustments. Conclusion: There is little evidence that any of the evaluated candidate variants act as modifiers of breast and/or ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers. Impact: Genome-wide association studies have been more successful at identifying genetic modifiers of BRCA1/2 penetrance than candidate gene studies.
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The quality of guidelines in pediatric surgery: can we all AGREE?
Pediatr. Surg. Int.
PUBLISHED: 10-07-2014
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Guidelines are meant to facilitate evidence-based clinical decision-making but vary in methodological rigor and quality of reporting. We assessed the quality of guidelines published in major pediatric surgery journals.
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The importance of mental health monitoring during transfer to adult care settings as examined among paediatric transplant recipients.
J Paediatr Child Health
PUBLISHED: 09-28-2014
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Although the transfer out of paediatrics is established as a dangerous time for transplant recipients, the reasons for this are not well understood. One possible explanation is that in general, young adulthood is a period of vulnerability to psychological distress, which could impact self-management. The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether psychological distress is associated with medication non-adherence after transfer.
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Differences in coreceptor specificity contribute to alternative tropism of HIV-1 subtype C for CD4 + T-cell subsets, including stem cell memory T-cells.
Retrovirology
PUBLISHED: 09-22-2014
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BackgroundCD4+ memory T-cells are a major target for infection by HIV-1, whereby latent provirus can establish and endure suppressive antiretroviral therapies. Although HIV-1 subtype C strains (C-HIV) account for the majority of HIV-1 infections worldwide, the susceptibility of CD4+ memory T-cells to infection by CCR5- (R5) and CXCR4-using (X4) C-HIV is unknown. Here, we quantified the susceptibility of naïve and memory CD4+ T-cell subsets, including stem cell memory T-cells (TSCM), to infection by HIV-1 subtype C (C-HIV) strains from treatment-naïve subjects who progressed from chronic to advanced stages of disease whilst either maintaining CCR5-using (R5) viruses (subjects 1503 and 1854), or who experienced emergence of dominant CXCR4-using (X4) strains (subject 1109).FindingsWe show that R5 and X4 C-HIV viruses preferentially target memory and naïve CD4+ T-cell subsets, respectively. While TSCM were susceptible to infection by both R5 and X4 C-HIV viruses, the proportion of infected CD4+ T-cells that were TSCM was higher for R5 strains. Mutagenesis studies of subject 1109 viruses established the V3 region of env as the determinant underlying the preferential targeting of naïve CD4+ T-cells by emergent X4 C-HIV variants in this subject. In contrast, the tropism of R5 C-HIV viruses for CD4+ T-cell subsets was maintained from chronic to advanced stages of disease in subjects 1503 and 1854.ConclusionsThis study provides new insights into the natural history of tropism alterations for CD4+ T-cell subsets by C-HIV strains during progression from chronic to advanced stages of infection. Although not preferentially targeted, our data suggest that TSCM and other memory CD4+ T-cells are likely to be viral reservoirs in subjects with X4 C-HIV infection.
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Is the central nervous system a reservoir of HIV-1?
Curr Opin HIV AIDS
PUBLISHED: 09-10-2014
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To summarize the evidence in the literature that supports the central nervous system (CNS) as a viral reservoir for HIV-1 and to prioritize future research efforts.
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Identification and characterization of novel associations in the CASP8/ALS2CR12 region on chromosome 2 with breast cancer risk.
Wei-Yu Lin, Nicola J Camp, Maya Ghoussaini, Jonathan Beesley, Kyriaki Michailidou, John L Hopper, Carmel Apicella, Melissa C Southey, Jennifer Stone, Marjanka K Schmidt, Annegien Broeks, Laura J Van't Veer, Emiel J Th Rutgers, Kenneth Muir, Artitaya Lophatananon, Sarah Stewart-Brown, Pornthep Siriwanarangsan, Peter A Fasching, Lothar Haeberle, Arif B Ekici, Matthias W Beckmann, Julian Peto, Isabel Dos-Santos-Silva, Olivia Fletcher, Nichola Johnson, Manjeet K Bolla, Qin Wang, Joe Dennis, Elinor J Sawyer, Timothy Cheng, Ian Tomlinson, Michael J Kerin, Nicola Miller, Frederik Marme, Harald M Surowy, Barbara Burwinkel, Pascal Guénel, Thérèse Truong, Florence Menegaux, Claire Mulot, Stig E Bojesen, Børge G Nordestgaard, Sune F Nielsen, Henrik Flyger, Javier Benitez, M Pilar Zamora, José Ignacio Arias Perez, Primitiva Menéndez, Anna González-Neira, Guillermo Pita, M Rosario Alonso, Nuria Alvarez, Daniel Herrero, Hoda Anton-Culver, Hermann Brenner, Aida Karina Dieffenbach, Volker Arndt, Christa Stegmaier, Alfons Meindl, Peter Lichtner, Rita K Schmutzler, Bertram Müller-Myhsok, Hiltrud Brauch, Thomas Brüning, Yon-Dschun Ko, , Daniel C Tessier, Daniel Vincent, Francois Bacot, Heli Nevanlinna, Kristiina Aittomäki, Carl Blomqvist, Sofia Khan, Keitaro Matsuo, Hidemi Ito, Hiroji Iwata, Akiyo Horio, Natalia V Bogdanova, Natalia N Antonenkova, Thilo Dörk, Annika Lindblom, Sara Margolin, Arto Mannermaa, Vesa Kataja, Veli-Matti Kosma, Jaana M Hartikainen, Anna H Wu, Chiu-Chen Tseng, David Van Den Berg, Daniel O Stram, Patrick Neven, Els Wauters, Hans Wildiers, Diether Lambrechts, Jenny Chang-Claude, Anja Rudolph, Petra Seibold, Dieter Flesch-Janys, Paolo Radice, Paolo Peterlongo, Siranoush Manoukian, Bernardo Bonanni, Fergus J Couch, Xianshu Wang, Celine Vachon, Kristen Purrington, Graham G Giles, Roger L Milne, Catriona McLean, Christopher A Haiman, Brian E Henderson, Fredrick Schumacher, Loic Le Marchand, Jacques Simard, Mark S Goldberg, France Labrèche, Martine Dumont, Soo Hwang Teo, Cheng Har Yip, Norhashimah Hassan, Eranga Nishanthie Vithana, Vessela Kristensen, Wei Zheng, Sandra Deming-Halverson, Martha J Shrubsole, Jirong Long, Robert Winqvist, Katri Pylkäs, Arja Jukkola-Vuorinen, Saila Kauppila, Irene L Andrulis, Julia A Knight, Gord Glendon, Sandrine Tchatchou, Peter Devilee, Robert A E M Tollenaar, Caroline Seynaeve, Christi J van Asperen, Montserrat Garcia-Closas, Jonine Figueroa, Jolanta Lissowska, Louise Brinton, Kamila Czene, Hatef Darabi, Mikael Eriksson, Judith S Brand, Maartje J Hooning, Antoinette Hollestelle, Ans M W van den Ouweland, Agnes Jager, Jingmei Li, Jianjun Liu, Keith Humphreys, Xiao-Ou Shu, Wei Lu, Yu-Tang Gao, Hui Cai, Simon S Cross, Malcolm W R Reed, William Blot, Lisa B Signorello, Qiuyin Cai, Paul D P Pharoah, Barbara Perkins, Mitul Shah, Fiona M Blows, Daehee Kang, Keun-Young Yoo, Dong-Young Noh, Mikael Hartman, Hui Miao, Kee Seng Chia, Thomas Choudary Putti, Ute Hamann, Craig Luccarini, Caroline Baynes, Shahana Ahmed, Mel Maranian, Catherine S Healey, Anna Jakubowska, Jan Lubiński, Katarzyna Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna Durda, Suleeporn Sangrajrang, Valerie Gaborieau, Paul Brennan, James McKay, Susan Slager, Amanda E Toland, Drakoulis Yannoukakos, Chen-Yang Shen, Chia-Ni Hsiung, Pei-Ei Wu, Shian-Ling Ding, Alan Ashworth, Michael Jones, Nick Orr, Anthony J Swerdlow, Helen Tsimiklis, Enes Makalic, Daniel F Schmidt, Quang M Bui, Stephen J Chanock, David J Hunter, Rebecca Hein, Norbert Dahmen, Lars Beckmann, Kirsimari Aaltonen, Taru A Muranen, Tuomas Heikkinen, Astrid Irwanto, Nazneen Rahman, Clare A Turnbull, Quinten Waisfisz, Hanne E J Meijers-Heijboer, Muriel A Adank, Rob B van der Luijt, Per Hall, Georgia Chenevix-Trench, Alison Dunning, Douglas F Easton, Angela Cox.
Hum. Mol. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 08-28-2014
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Previous studies have suggested that polymorphisms in CASP8 on chromosome 2 are associated with breast cancer risk. To clarify the role of CASP8 in breast cancer susceptibility, we carried out dense genotyping of this region in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC). Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) spanning a 1 Mb region around CASP8 were genotyped in 46 450 breast cancer cases and 42 600 controls of European origin from 41 studies participating in the BCAC as part of a custom genotyping array experiment (iCOGS). Missing genotypes and SNPs were imputed and, after quality exclusions, 501 typed and 1232 imputed SNPs were included in logistic regression models adjusting for study and ancestry principal components. The SNPs retained in the final model were investigated further in data from nine genome-wide association studies (GWAS) comprising in total 10 052 case and 12 575 control subjects. The most significant association signal observed in European subjects was for the imputed intronic SNP rs1830298 in ALS2CR12 (telomeric to CASP8), with per allele odds ratio and 95% confidence interval [OR (95% confidence interval, CI)] for the minor allele of 1.05 (1.03-1.07), P = 1 × 10(-5). Three additional independent signals from intronic SNPs were identified, in CASP8 (rs36043647), ALS2CR11 (rs59278883) and CFLAR (rs7558475). The association with rs1830298 was replicated in the imputed results from the combined GWAS (P = 3 × 10(-6)), yielding a combined OR (95% CI) of 1.06 (1.04-1.08), P = 1 × 10(-9). Analyses of gene expression associations in peripheral blood and normal breast tissue indicate that CASP8 might be the target gene, suggesting a mechanism involving apoptosis.
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Epigenome-wide methylation in DNA from peripheral blood as a marker of risk for breast cancer.
Breast Cancer Res. Treat.
PUBLISHED: 08-20-2014
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Aberrant DNA methylation is a key feature of breast carcinoma. We aimed to test the association between breast cancer risk and epigenome-wide methylation in DNA from peripheral blood. Nested case-control study within the prospective Melbourne Collaborative Cohort Study. DNA was extracted from before-diagnosis blood samples (420 incident cases and matched controls). Methylation was measured with the Illumina Infinium Human Methylation 450 BeadChip array. Odds ratio (OR) for epigenome-wide methylation, quantified as the mean beta values across the CpGs, in relation to breast cancer risk were estimated using conditional logistic regression. Overall, the OR for breast cancer was 0.42 (95 % CI 0.20-0.90) for the top versus bottom quartile of epigenome-wide DNA methylation and the OR for a one standard deviation increment was 0.69 (95 % CI 0.50-0.95; test for linear trend, p = 0.02). Epigenome-wide DNA methylation of CpGs within functional promoters was associated with an increased risk, whereas epigenome-wide DNA methylation of genomic regions outside promoters was associated with decreased risk (test for heterogeneity, p = 0.0002). The increased risk associated with epigenome-wide DNA methylation in functional promoters did not vary by time between blood collection and diagnosis, whereas the inverse association with epigenome-wide DNA methylation outside functional promoters was strongest when the interval from blood collection to diagnosis was less than 5 years and weakest for the longest interval. Epigenome-wide methylation in DNA extracted from peripheral blood collected before diagnosis may have potential utility as markers of breast cancer risk and for early detection.
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The AGREE Enterprise: a decade of advancing clinical practice guidelines.
Implement Sci
PUBLISHED: 08-15-2014
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The original AGREE (Appraisal of Guidelines for REsearch and Evaluation) Instrument was published in 2003, and its revision, the AGREE II, in 2009. Together, they filled an important gap in the guideline and quality of care fields. Ten years later, the AGREE Enterprise reflects on a trajectory of projects and international collaboration that have contributed to advancing the science and quality of practice guidelines and the uptake of AGREE/AGREE II.
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Detection of infectious organisms in archival prostate cancer tissues.
BMC Cancer
PUBLISHED: 08-09-2014
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Seroepidemiological studies have reported associations between exposure to sexually transmitted organisms and prostate cancer risk. This study sought DNA evidence of candidate organisms in archival prostate cancer tissues with the aim of assessing if a subset of these cancers show any association with common genital infections.
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Should the grading of colorectal adenocarcinoma include microsatellite instability status?
Hum. Pathol.
PUBLISHED: 07-17-2014
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Adenocarcinomas of the colon and rectum are graded using a 2-tiered system into histologic low-grade and high-grade tumors based on the proportion of gland formation. The current grading system does not apply to subtypes of carcinomas associated with a high frequency of microsatellite instability (MSI), such as mucinous and medullary carcinomas. We investigated the combined effect of histologic grade and MSI status on survival for 738 patients with colorectal carcinoma (48% female; mean age at diagnosis 68.2 years). The proportion of high-grade adenocarcinoma was 18%. MSI was observed in 59 adenocarcinomas (9%), with higher frequency in high-grade tumors compared with low-grade tumors (20% versus 6%; P < .001). Using Cox regression models, adjusting for sex and age at diagnosis and stratifying by the American Joint Committee on Cancer stage, microsatellite stable (MSS) high-grade tumors were associated with increased hazard of all-cause and colorectal cancer-specific mortality: hazard ratio 2.09 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.58-2.77) and 2.54 (95% CI, 1.86-3.47), respectively, both P < .001. A new grading system separating adenocarcinoma into low grade (all histologic low grade and MSI high grade) and high grade (MSS histologic high grade) gave a lower Akaike information criterion value when compared with the current grading system and thus represented a better model fit to stratify patients according to survival. We found that patients with a high-grade adenocarcinoma had significantly shorter survival than patients with low-grade adenocarcinoma only if the tumor was MSS, suggesting that the grading of colorectal adenocarcinoma with high-grade histologic features should be made according to the MSI status of the tumor.
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Imputation and subset-based association analysis across different cancer types identifies multiple independent risk loci in the TERT-CLPTM1L region on chromosome 5p15.33.
Zhaoming Wang, Bin Zhu, Mingfeng Zhang, Hemang Parikh, Jinping Jia, Charles C Chung, Joshua N Sampson, Jason W Hoskins, Amy Hutchinson, Laurie Burdette, Abdisamad Ibrahim, Christopher Hautman, Preethi S Raj, Christian C Abnet, Andrew A Adjei, Anders Ahlbom, Demetrius Albanes, Naomi E Allen, Christine B Ambrosone, Melinda Aldrich, Pilar Amiano, Christopher Amos, Ulrika Andersson, Gerald Andriole, Irene L Andrulis, Cecilia Arici, Alan A Arslan, Melissa A Austin, Dalsu Baris, Donald A Barkauskas, Bryan A Bassig, Laura E Beane Freeman, Christine D Berg, Sonja I Berndt, Pier Alberto Bertazzi, Richard B Biritwum, Amanda Black, William Blot, Heiner Boeing, Paolo Boffetta, Kelly Bolton, Marie-Christine Boutron-Ruault, Paige M Bracci, Paul Brennan, Louise A Brinton, Michelle Brotzman, H Bas Bueno-de-Mesquita, Julie E Buring, Mary Ann Butler, Qiuyin Cai, Géraldine Cancel-Tassin, Federico Canzian, Guangwen Cao, Neil E Caporaso, Alfredo Carrato, Tania Carreon, Angela Carta, Gee-Chen Chang, I-Shou Chang, Jenny Chang-Claude, Xu Che, Chien-Jen Chen, Chih-Yi Chen, Chung-Hsing Chen, Constance Chen, Kuan-Yu Chen, Yuh-Min Chen, Anand P Chokkalingam, Lisa W Chu, Francoise Clavel-Chapelon, Graham A Colditz, Joanne S Colt, David Conti, Michael B Cook, Victoria K Cortessis, E David Crawford, Olivier Cussenot, Faith G Davis, Immaculata De Vivo, Xiang Deng, Ti Ding, Colin P Dinney, Anna Luisa Di Stefano, W Ryan Diver, Eric J Duell, Joanne W Elena, Jin-Hu Fan, Heather Spencer Feigelson, Maria Feychting, Jonine D Figueroa, Adrienne M Flanagan, Joseph F Fraumeni, Neal D Freedman, Brooke L Fridley, Charles S Fuchs, Manuela Gago-Dominguez, Steven Gallinger, Yu-Tang Gao, Susan M Gapstur, Montserrat Garcia-Closas, Reina Garcia-Closas, Julie M Gastier-Foster, J Michael Gaziano, Daniela S Gerhard, Carol A Giffen, Graham G Giles, Elizabeth M Gillanders, Edward L Giovannucci, Michael Goggins, Nalan Gokgoz, Alisa M Goldstein, Carlos González, Richard Gorlick, Mark H Greene, Myron Gross, H Barton Grossman, Robert Grubb, Jian Gu, Peng Guan, Christopher A Haiman, Göran Hallmans, Susan E Hankinson, Curtis C Harris, Patricia Hartge, Claudia Hattinger, Richard B Hayes, Qincheng He, Lee Helman, Brian E Henderson, Roger Henriksson, Judith Hoffman-Bolton, Chancellor Hohensee, Elizabeth A Holly, Yun-Chul Hong, Robert N Hoover, H Dean Hosgood, Chin-Fu Hsiao, Ann W Hsing, Chao Agnes Hsiung, Nan Hu, Wei Hu, Zhibin Hu, Ming-Shyan Huang, David J Hunter, Peter D Inskip, Hidemi Ito, Eric J Jacobs, Kevin B Jacobs, Mazda Jenab, Bu-Tian Ji, Christoffer Johansen, Mattias Johansson, Alison Johnson, Rudolf Kaaks, Ashish M Kamat, Aruna Kamineni, Margaret Karagas, Chand Khanna, Kay-Tee Khaw, Christopher Kim, In-Sam Kim, Jin Hee Kim, Yeul Hong Kim, Young-Chul Kim, Young Tae Kim, Chang Hyun Kang, Yoo Jin Jung, Cari M Kitahara, Alison P Klein, Robert Klein, Manolis Kogevinas, Woon-Puay Koh, Takashi Kohno, Laurence N Kolonel, Charles Kooperberg, Christian P Kratz, Vittorio Krogh, Hideo Kunitoh, Robert C Kurtz, Nilgun Kurucu, Qing Lan, Mark Lathrop, Ching C Lau, Fernando Lecanda, Kyoung-Mu Lee, Maxwell P Lee, Loic Le Marchand, Seth P Lerner, Donghui Li, Linda M Liao, Wei-Yen Lim, Dongxin Lin, Jie Lin, Sara Lindstrom, Martha S Linet, Jolanta Lissowska, Jianjun Liu, Börje Ljungberg, Josep Lloreta, Daru Lu, Jing Ma, Nuria Malats, Satu Mannisto, Neyssa Marina, Giuseppe Mastrangelo, Keitaro Matsuo, Katherine A McGlynn, Roberta Mckean-Cowdin, Lorna H McNeill, Robert R McWilliams, Beatrice S Melin, Paul S Meltzer, James E Mensah, Xiaoping Miao, Dominique S Michaud, Alison M Mondul, Lee E Moore, Kenneth Muir, Shelley Niwa, Sara H Olson, Nick Orr, Salvatore Panico, Jae Yong Park, Alpa V Patel, Ana Patiño-García, Sofia Pavanello, Petra H M Peeters, Beata Peplonska, Ulrike Peters, Gloria M Petersen, Piero Picci, Malcolm C Pike, Stefano Porru, Jennifer Prescott, Xia Pu, Mark P Purdue, You-Lin Qiao, Preetha Rajaraman, Elio Riboli, Harvey A Risch, Rebecca J Rodabough, Nathaniel Rothman, Avima M Ruder, Jeong-Seon Ryu, Marc Sanson, Alan Schned, Fredrick R Schumacher, Ann G Schwartz, Kendra L Schwartz, Molly Schwenn, Katia Scotlandi, Adeline Seow, Consol Serra, Massimo Serra, Howard D Sesso, Gianluca Severi, Hongbing Shen, Min Shen, Sanjay Shete, Kouya Shiraishi, Xiao-Ou Shu, Afshan Siddiq, Luis Sierrasesúmaga, Sabina Sierri, Alan Dart Loon Sihoe, Debra T Silverman, Matthias Simon, Melissa C Southey, Logan Spector, Margaret Spitz, Meir Stampfer, Pär Stattin, Mariana C Stern, Victoria L Stevens, Rachael Z Stolzenberg-Solomon, Daniel O Stram, Sara S Strom, Wu-Chou Su, Malin Sund, Sook Whan Sung, Anthony Swerdlow, Wen Tan, Hideo Tanaka, Wei Tang, Ze-Zhang Tang, Adonina Tardón, Evelyn Tay, Philip R Taylor, Yao Tettey, David M Thomas, Roberto Tirabosco, Anne Tjonneland, Geoffrey S Tobias, Jorge R Toro, Ruth C Travis, Dimitrios Trichopoulos, Rebecca Troisi, Ann Truelove, Ying-Huang Tsai, Margaret A Tucker, Rosario Tumino, David Van Den Berg, Stephen K Van Den Eeden, Roel Vermeulen, Paolo Vineis, Kala Visvanathan, Ulla Vogel, Chaoyu Wang, Chengfeng Wang, Junwen Wang, Sophia S Wang, Elisabete Weiderpass, Stephanie J Weinstein, Nicolas Wentzensen, William Wheeler, Emily White, John K Wiencke, Alicja Wolk, Brian M Wolpin, Maria Pik Wong, Margaret Wrensch, Chen Wu, Tangchun Wu, Xifeng Wu, Yi-Long Wu, Jay S Wunder, Yong-Bing Xiang, Jun Xu, Hannah P Yang, Pan-Chyr Yang, Yasushi Yatabe, Yuanqing Ye, Edward D Yeboah, Zhihua Yin, Chen Ying, Chong-Jen Yu, Kai Yu, Jian-Min Yuan, Krista A Zanetti, Anne Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Wei Zheng, Baosen Zhou, Lisa Mirabello, Sharon A Savage, Peter Kraft, Stephen J Chanock, Meredith Yeager, Maria Terese Landi, Jianxin Shi, Nilanjan Chatterjee, Laufey T Amundadottir.
Hum. Mol. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 07-15-2014
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Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have mapped risk alleles for at least 10 distinct cancers to a small region of 63 000 bp on chromosome 5p15.33. This region harbors the TERT and CLPTM1L genes; the former encodes the catalytic subunit of telomerase reverse transcriptase and the latter may play a role in apoptosis. To investigate further the genetic architecture of common susceptibility alleles in this region, we conducted an agnostic subset-based meta-analysis (association analysis based on subsets) across six distinct cancers in 34 248 cases and 45 036 controls. Based on sequential conditional analysis, we identified as many as six independent risk loci marked by common single-nucleotide polymorphisms: five in the TERT gene (Region 1: rs7726159, P = 2.10 × 10(-39); Region 3: rs2853677, P = 3.30 × 10(-36) and PConditional = 2.36 × 10(-8); Region 4: rs2736098, P = 3.87 × 10(-12) and PConditional = 5.19 × 10(-6), Region 5: rs13172201, P = 0.041 and PConditional = 2.04 × 10(-6); and Region 6: rs10069690, P = 7.49 × 10(-15) and PConditional = 5.35 × 10(-7)) and one in the neighboring CLPTM1L gene (Region 2: rs451360; P = 1.90 × 10(-18) and PConditional = 7.06 × 10(-16)). Between three and five cancers mapped to each independent locus with both risk-enhancing and protective effects. Allele-specific effects on DNA methylation were seen for a subset of risk loci, indicating that methylation and subsequent effects on gene expression may contribute to the biology of risk variants on 5p15.33. Our results provide strong support for extensive pleiotropy across this region of 5p15.33, to an extent not previously observed in other cancer susceptibility loci.
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Type II Toxoplasma gondii induction of CD40 on infected macrophages enhances interleukin-12 responses.
Infect. Immun.
PUBLISHED: 07-14-2014
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Toxoplasma gondii is an obligate intracellular parasite that can cause severe neurological disease in infected humans. CD40 is a receptor on macrophages that plays a critical role in controlling T. gondii infection. We examined the regulation of CD40 on the surface of T. gondii-infected bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMdMs). T. gondii induced CD40 expression both at the transcript level and on the cell surface, and interestingly, the effect was parasite strain specific: CD40 levels were dramatically increased in type II T. gondii-infected BMdMs compared to type I- or type III-infected cells. Type II induction of CD40 was specific to cells harboring intracellular parasites and detectable as early as 6 h postinfection (hpi) at the transcript level. CD40 protein expression peaked at 18 hpi. Using forward genetics with progeny from a type II × type III cross, we found that CD40 induction mapped to a region of chromosome X that included the gene encoding the dense granule protein 15 (GRA15). Using type I parasites stably expressing the type II allele of GRA15 (GRA15II), we found that type I GRA15II parasites induced the expression of CD40 on infected cells in an NF-?B-dependent manner. In addition, stable expression of hemagglutinin-tagged GRA15II in THP-1 cells resulted in CD40 upregulation in the absence of infection. Since CD40 signaling contributes to interleukin-12 (IL-12) production, we examined IL-12 from infected macrophages and found that CD40L engagement of CD40 amplified the IL-12 response in type II-infected cells. These data indicate that GRA15II induction of CD40 promotes parasite immunity through the production of IL-12.
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Genome-wide association study identifies multiple susceptibility loci for diffuse large B cell lymphoma.
James R Cerhan, Sonja I Berndt, Joseph Vijai, Hervé Ghesquières, James McKay, Sophia S Wang, Zhaoming Wang, Meredith Yeager, Lucia Conde, Paul I W de Bakker, Alexandra Nieters, David Cox, Laurie Burdett, Alain Monnereau, Christopher R Flowers, Anneclaire J De Roos, Angela R Brooks-Wilson, Qing Lan, Gianluca Severi, Mads Melbye, Jian Gu, Rebecca D Jackson, Eleanor Kane, Lauren R Teras, Mark P Purdue, Claire M Vajdic, John J Spinelli, Graham G Giles, Demetrius Albanes, Rachel S Kelly, Mariagrazia Zucca, Kimberly A Bertrand, Anne Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Charles Lawrence, Amy Hutchinson, Degui Zhi, Thomas M Habermann, Brian K Link, Anne J Novak, Ahmet Dogan, Yan W Asmann, Mark Liebow, Carrie A Thompson, Stephen M Ansell, Thomas E Witzig, George J Weiner, Amelie S Veron, Diana Zelenika, Hervé Tilly, Corinne Haioun, Thierry Jo Molina, Henrik Hjalgrim, Bengt Glimelius, Hans-Olov Adami, Paige M Bracci, Jacques Riby, Martyn T Smith, Elizabeth A Holly, Wendy Cozen, Patricia Hartge, Lindsay M Morton, Richard K Severson, Lesley F Tinker, Kari E North, Nikolaus Becker, Yolanda Benavente, Paolo Boffetta, Paul Brennan, Lenka Foretova, Marc Maynadié, Anthony Staines, Tracy Lightfoot, Simon Crouch, Alex Smith, Eve Roman, W Ryan Diver, Kenneth Offit, Andrew Zelenetz, Robert J Klein, Danylo J Villano, Tongzhang Zheng, Yawei Zhang, Theodore R Holford, Anne Kricker, Jenny Turner, Melissa C Southey, Jacqueline Clavel, Jarmo Virtamo, Stephanie Weinstein, Elio Riboli, Paolo Vineis, Rudolph Kaaks, Dimitrios Trichopoulos, Roel C H Vermeulen, Heiner Boeing, Anne Tjonneland, Emanuele Angelucci, Simonetta Di Lollo, Marco Rais, Brenda M Birmann, Francine Laden, Edward Giovannucci, Peter Kraft, Jinyan Huang, Baoshan Ma, Yuanqing Ye, Brian C H Chiu, Joshua Sampson, Liming Liang, Ju-Hyun Park, Charles C Chung, Dennis D Weisenburger, Nilanjan Chatterjee, Joseph F Fraumeni, Susan L Slager, Xifeng Wu, Silvia de Sanjosé, Karin E Smedby, Gilles Salles, Christine F Skibola, Nathaniel Rothman, Stephen J Chanock.
Nat. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 06-26-2014
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Diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is the most common lymphoma subtype and is clinically aggressive. To identify genetic susceptibility loci for DLBCL, we conducted a meta-analysis of 3 new genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and 1 previous scan, totaling 3,857 cases and 7,666 controls of European ancestry, with additional genotyping of 9 promising SNPs in 1,359 cases and 4,557 controls. In our multi-stage analysis, five independent SNPs in four loci achieved genome-wide significance marked by rs116446171 at 6p25.3 (EXOC2; P = 2.33 × 10(-21)), rs2523607 at 6p21.33 (HLA-B; P = 2.40 × 10(-10)), rs79480871 at 2p23.3 (NCOA1; P = 4.23 × 10(-8)) and two independent SNPs, rs13255292 and rs4733601, at 8q24.21 (PVT1; P = 9.98 × 10(-13) and 3.63 × 10(-11), respectively). These data provide substantial new evidence for genetic susceptibility to this B cell malignancy and point to pathways involved in immune recognition and immune function in the pathogenesis of DLBCL.
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Common non-synonymous SNPs associated with breast cancer susceptibility: findings from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium.
Roger L Milne, Barbara Burwinkel, Kyriaki Michailidou, Jose-Ignacio Arias-Perez, M Pilar Zamora, Primitiva Menéndez-Rodríguez, David Hardisson, Marta Mendiola, Anna González-Neira, Guillermo Pita, M Rosario Alonso, Joe Dennis, Qin Wang, Manjeet K Bolla, Anthony Swerdlow, Alan Ashworth, Nick Orr, Minouk Schoemaker, Yon-Dschun Ko, Hiltrud Brauch, Ute Hamann, , Irene L Andrulis, Julia A Knight, Gord Glendon, Sandrine Tchatchou, Keitaro Matsuo, Hidemi Ito, Hiroji Iwata, Kazuo Tajima, Jingmei Li, Judith S Brand, Hermann Brenner, Aida Karina Dieffenbach, Volker Arndt, Christa Stegmaier, Diether Lambrechts, Gilian Peuteman, Marie-Rose Christiaens, Ann Smeets, Anna Jakubowska, Jan Lubiński, Katarzyna Jaworska-Bieniek, Katazyna Durda, Mikael Hartman, Miao Hui, Wei Yen Lim, Ching Wan Chan, Federick Marme, Rongxi Yang, Peter Bugert, Annika Lindblom, Sara Margolin, Montserrat Garcia-Closas, Stephen J Chanock, Jolanta Lissowska, Jonine D Figueroa, Stig E Bojesen, Børge G Nordestgaard, Henrik Flyger, Maartje J Hooning, Mieke Kriege, Ans M W van den Ouweland, Linetta B Koppert, Olivia Fletcher, Nichola Johnson, Isabel Dos-Santos-Silva, Julian Peto, Wei Zheng, Sandra Deming-Halverson, Martha J Shrubsole, Jirong Long, Jenny Chang-Claude, Anja Rudolph, Petra Seibold, Dieter Flesch-Janys, Robert Winqvist, Katri Pylkäs, Arja Jukkola-Vuorinen, Mervi Grip, Angela Cox, Simon S Cross, Malcolm W R Reed, Marjanka K Schmidt, Annegien Broeks, Sten Cornelissen, Linde Braaf, Daehee Kang, Ji-Yeob Choi, Sue K Park, Dong-Young Noh, Jacques Simard, Martine Dumont, Mark S Goldberg, France Labrèche, Peter A Fasching, Alexander Hein, Arif B Ekici, Matthias W Beckmann, Paolo Radice, Paolo Peterlongo, Jacopo Azzollini, Monica Barile, Elinor Sawyer, Ian Tomlinson, Michael Kerin, Nicola Miller, John L Hopper, Daniel F Schmidt, Enes Makalic, Melissa C Southey, Soo Hwang Teo, Cheng Har Yip, Kavitta Sivanandan, Wan-Ting Tay, Chen-Yang Shen, Chia-Ni Hsiung, Jyh-Cherng Yu, Ming-Feng Hou, Pascal Guénel, Thérèse Truong, Marie Sanchez, Claire Mulot, William Blot, Qiuyin Cai, Heli Nevanlinna, Taru A Muranen, Kristiina Aittomäki, Carl Blomqvist, Anna H Wu, Chiu-Chen Tseng, David Van Den Berg, Daniel O Stram, Natalia Bogdanova, Thilo Dörk, Kenneth Muir, Artitaya Lophatananon, Sarah Stewart-Brown, Pornthep Siriwanarangsan, Arto Mannermaa, Vesa Kataja, Veli-Matti Kosma, Jaana M Hartikainen, Xiao-Ou Shu, Wei Lu, Yu-Tang Gao, Ben Zhang, Fergus J Couch, Amanda E Toland, Drakoulis Yannoukakos, Suleeporn Sangrajrang, James McKay, Xianshu Wang, Janet E Olson, Celine Vachon, Kristen Purrington, Gianluca Severi, Laura Baglietto, Christopher A Haiman, Brian E Henderson, Fredrick Schumacher, Loic Le Marchand, Peter Devilee, Robert A E M Tollenaar, Caroline Seynaeve, Kamila Czene, Mikael Eriksson, Keith Humphreys, Hatef Darabi, Shahana Ahmed, Mitul Shah, Paul D P Pharoah, Per Hall, Graham G Giles, Javier Benitez, Alison M Dunning, Georgia Chenevix-Trench, Douglas F Easton.
Hum. Mol. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 06-18-2014
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Candidate variant association studies have been largely unsuccessful in identifying common breast cancer susceptibility variants, although most studies have been underpowered to detect associations of a realistic magnitude. We assessed 41 common non-synonymous single-nucleotide polymorphisms (nsSNPs) for which evidence of association with breast cancer risk had been previously reported. Case-control data were combined from 38 studies of white European women (46 450 cases and 42 600 controls) and analyzed using unconditional logistic regression. Strong evidence of association was observed for three nsSNPs: ATXN7-K264R at 3p21 [rs1053338, per allele OR = 1.07, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.04-1.10, P = 2.9 × 10(-6)], AKAP9-M463I at 7q21 (rs6964587, OR = 1.05, 95% CI = 1.03-1.07, P = 1.7 × 10(-6)) and NEK10-L513S at 3p24 (rs10510592, OR = 1.10, 95% CI = 1.07-1.12, P = 5.1 × 10(-17)). The first two associations reached genome-wide statistical significance in a combined analysis of available data, including independent data from nine genome-wide association studies (GWASs): for ATXN7-K264R, OR = 1.07 (95% CI = 1.05-1.10, P = 1.0 × 10(-8)); for AKAP9-M463I, OR = 1.05 (95% CI = 1.04-1.07, P = 2.0 × 10(-10)). Further analysis of other common variants in these two regions suggested that intronic SNPs nearby are more strongly associated with disease risk. We have thus identified a novel susceptibility locus at 3p21, and confirmed previous suggestive evidence that rs6964587 at 7q21 is associated with risk. The third locus, rs10510592, is located in an established breast cancer susceptibility region; the association was substantially attenuated after adjustment for the known GWAS hit. Thus, each of the associated nsSNPs is likely to be a marker for another, non-coding, variant causally related to breast cancer risk. Further fine-mapping and functional studies are required to identify the underlying risk-modifying variants and the genes through which they act.
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Genetic variation in mitotic regulatory pathway genes is associated with breast tumor grade.
Kristen S Purrington, Seth Slettedahl, Manjeet K Bolla, Kyriaki Michailidou, Kamila Czene, Heli Nevanlinna, Stig E Bojesen, Irene L Andrulis, Angela Cox, Per Hall, Jane Carpenter, Drakoulis Yannoukakos, Christopher A Haiman, Peter A Fasching, Arto Mannermaa, Robert Winqvist, Hermann Brenner, Annika Lindblom, Georgia Chenevix-Trench, Javier Benitez, Anthony Swerdlow, Vessela Kristensen, Pascal Guénel, Alfons Meindl, Hatef Darabi, Mikael Eriksson, Rainer Fagerholm, Kristiina Aittomäki, Carl Blomqvist, Børge G Nordestgaard, Sune F Nielsen, Henrik Flyger, Xianshu Wang, Curtis Olswold, Janet E Olson, Anna Marie Mulligan, Julia A Knight, Sandrine Tchatchou, Malcolm W R Reed, Simon S Cross, Jianjun Liu, Jingmei Li, Keith Humphreys, Christine Clarke, Rodney Scott, , Florentia Fostira, George Fountzilas, Irene Konstantopoulou, Brian E Henderson, Fredrick Schumacher, Loic Le Marchand, Arif B Ekici, Arndt Hartmann, Matthias W Beckmann, Jaana M Hartikainen, Veli-Matti Kosma, Vesa Kataja, Arja Jukkola-Vuorinen, Katri Pylkäs, Saila Kauppila, Aida Karina Dieffenbach, Christa Stegmaier, Volker Arndt, Sara Margolin, Rosemary Balleine, José Ignacio Arias Perez, M Pilar Zamora, Primitiva Menéndez, Alan Ashworth, Michael Jones, Nick Orr, Patrick Arveux, Pierre Kerbrat, Thérèse Truong, Peter Bugert, Amanda E Toland, Christine B Ambrosone, France Labrèche, Mark S Goldberg, Martine Dumont, Argyrios Ziogas, Eunjung Lee, Gillian S Dite, Carmel Apicella, Melissa C Southey, Jirong Long, Martha Shrubsole, Sandra Deming-Halverson, Filomena Ficarazzi, Monica Barile, Paolo Peterlongo, Katarzyna Durda, Katarzyna Jaworska-Bieniek, Robert A E M Tollenaar, Caroline Seynaeve, Thomas Brüning, Yon-Dschun Ko, Carolien H M van Deurzen, John W M Martens, Mieke Kriege, Jonine D Figueroa, Stephen J Chanock, Jolanta Lissowska, Ian Tomlinson, Michael J Kerin, Nicola Miller, Andreas Schneeweiss, William J Tapper, Susan M Gerty, Lorraine Durcan, Catriona McLean, Roger L Milne, Laura Baglietto, Isabel Dos Santos Silva, Olivia Fletcher, Nichola Johnson, Laura J Van't Veer, Sten Cornelissen, Asta Försti, Diana Torres, Thomas Rüdiger, Anja Rudolph, Dieter Flesch-Janys, Stefan Nickels, Caroline Weltens, Giuseppe Floris, Matthieu Moisse, Joe Dennis, Qin Wang, Alison M Dunning, Mitul Shah, Judith Brown, Jacques Simard, Hoda Anton-Culver, Susan L Neuhausen, John L Hopper, Natalia Bogdanova, Thilo Dörk, Wei Zheng, Paolo Radice, Anna Jakubowska, Jan Lubiński, Peter Devillee, Hiltrud Brauch, Maartje Hooning, Montserrat Garcia-Closas, Elinor Sawyer, Barbara Burwinkel, Frederick Marmee, Diana M Eccles, Graham G Giles, Julian Peto, Marjanka Schmidt, Annegien Broeks, Ute Hamann, Jenny Chang-Claude, Diether Lambrechts, Paul D P Pharoah, Douglas Easton, V Shane Pankratz, Susan Slager, Celine M Vachon, Fergus J Couch.
Hum. Mol. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 06-13-2014
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Mitotic index is an important component of histologic grade and has an etiologic role in breast tumorigenesis. Several small candidate gene studies have reported associations between variation in mitotic genes and breast cancer risk. We measured associations between 2156 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from 194 mitotic genes and breast cancer risk, overall and by histologic grade, in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC) iCOGS study (n = 39 067 cases; n = 42 106 controls). SNPs in TACC2 [rs17550038: odds ratio (OR) = 1.24, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.16-1.33, P = 4.2 × 10(-10)) and EIF3H (rs799890: OR = 1.07, 95% CI 1.04-1.11, P = 8.7 × 10(-6)) were significantly associated with risk of low-grade breast cancer. The TACC2 signal was retained (rs17550038: OR = 1.15, 95% CI 1.07-1.23, P = 7.9 × 10(-5)) after adjustment for breast cancer risk SNPs in the nearby FGFR2 gene, suggesting that TACC2 is a novel, independent genome-wide significant genetic risk locus for low-grade breast cancer. While no SNPs were individually associated with high-grade disease, a pathway-level gene set analysis showed that variation across the 194 mitotic genes was associated with high-grade breast cancer risk (P = 2.1 × 10(-3)). These observations will provide insight into the contribution of mitotic defects to histological grade and the etiology of breast cancer.
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Genetic variation at CYP3A is associated with age at menarche and breast cancer risk: a case-control study.
Nichola Johnson, Frank Dudbridge, Nick Orr, Lorna Gibson, Michael E Jones, Minouk J Schoemaker, Elizabeth J Folkerd, Ben P Haynes, John L Hopper, Melissa C Southey, Gillian S Dite, Carmel Apicella, Marjanka K Schmidt, Annegien Broeks, Laura J Van T Veer, Femke Atsma, Kenneth Muir, Artitaya Lophatananon, Peter A Fasching, Matthias W Beckmann, Arif B Ekici, Stefan P Renner, Elinor Sawyer, Ian Tomlinson, Michael Kerin, Nicola Miller, Barbara Burwinkel, Frederik Marme, Andreas Schneeweiss, Christof Sohn, Pascal Guénel, Thérèse Truong, Emilie Cordina, Florence Menegaux, Stig E Bojesen, Børge G Nordestgaard, Henrik Flyger, Roger Milne, M Pilar Zamora, José Ignacio Arias Perez, Javier Benitez, Leslie Bernstein, Hoda Anton-Culver, Argyrios Ziogas, Christina Clarke Dur, Hermann Brenner, Heiko Muller, Volker Arndt, Aida Karina Dieffenbach, Alfons Meindl, Joerg Heil, Claus R Bartram, Rita K Schmutzler, Hiltrud Brauch, Christina Justenhoven, Yon-Dschun Ko, Heli Nevanlinna, Taru A Muranen, Kristiina Aittomäki, Carl Blomqvist, Keitaro Matsuo, Thilo Dörk, Natalia V Bogdanova, Natalia N Antonenkova, Annika Lindblom, Arto Mannermaa, Vesa Kataja, Veli-Matti Kosma, Jaana M Hartikainen, Georgia Chenevix-Trench, Jonathan Beesley, Anna H Wu, David Van Den Berg, Chiu-Chen Tseng, Diether Lambrechts, Dominiek Smeets, Patrick Neven, Hans Wildiers, Jenny Chang-Claude, Anja Rudolph, Stefan Nickels, Dieter Flesch-Janys, Paolo Radice, Paolo Peterlongo, Bernardo Bonanni, Valeria Pensotti, Fergus J Couch, Janet E Olson, Xianshu Wang, Zachary Fredericksen, Vernon S Pankratz, Graham G Giles, Gianluca Severi, Laura Baglietto, Chris Haiman, Jacques Simard, Mark S Goldberg, France Labrèche, Martine Dumont, Penny Soucy, Soo Teo, Cheng Har Yip, Sze Yee Phuah, Belinda K Cornes, Vessela N Kristensen, Grethe Grenaker Alnæs, Anne-Lise Børresen-Dale, Wei Zheng, Robert Winqvist, Katri Pylkäs, Arja Jukkola-Vuorinen, Mervi Grip, Irene L Andrulis, Julia A Knight, Gord Glendon, Anna Marie Mulligan, Peter Devillee, Jonine Figueroa, Stephen J Chanock, Jolanta Lissowska, Mark E Sherman, Per Hall, Nils Schoof, Maartje Hooning, Antoinette Hollestelle, Rogier A Oldenburg, Madeleine Tilanus-Linthorst, Jianjun Liu, Angie Cox, Ian W Brock, Malcolm Wr Reed, Simon S Cross, William Blot, Lisa B Signorello, Paul Dp Pharoah, Alison M Dunning, Mitul Shah, Daehee Kang, Dong-Young Noh, Sue K Park, Ji-Yeob Choi, Mikael Hartman, Hui Miao, Wei Yen Lim, Anthony Tang, Ute Hamann, Asta Försti, Thomas Rüdiger, Hans Ulrich Ulmer, Anna Jakubowska, Jan Lubiński, Katarzyna Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna Durda, Suleeporn Sangrajrang, Valerie Gaborieau, Paul Brennan, James McKay, Susan Slager, Amanda E Toland, Celine Vachon, Drakoulis Yannoukakos, Chen-Yang Shen, Jyh-Cherng Yu, Chiun-Sheng Huang, Ming-Feng Hou, Anna González-Neira, Daniel C Tessier, Daniel Vincent, Francois Bacot, Craig Luccarini, Joe Dennis, Kyriaki Michailidou, Manjeet K Bolla, Jean Wang, Douglas F Easton, Montserrat Garcia-Closas, Mitch Dowsett, Alan Ashworth, Anthony J Swerdlow, Julian Peto, Isabel Dos Santos Silva, Olivia Fletcher.
Breast Cancer Res.
PUBLISHED: 05-26-2014
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We have previously shown that a tag single nucleotide polymorphism (rs10235235), which maps to the CYP3A locus (7q22.1), was associated with a reduction in premenopausal urinary estrone glucuronide levels and a modest reduction in risk of breast cancer in women age <=50 years.
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Increasing participation in colorectal cancer screening: Results from a cluster randomized trial of directly mailed gFOBT kits to previous nonresponders.
Int. J. Cancer
PUBLISHED: 05-16-2014
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Regular screening using guaiac fecal occult blood test (gFOBT) reduces mortality from colorectal cancer (CRC). The objective of this study was to determine whether the addition of a gFOBT kit to a second mailed invitation compared to a second mailed invitation alone increases CRC screening among eligible persons who did not respond to an initial mailed invitation. We conducted a cluster randomized controlled trial, with the physician as the unit of randomization. Participants were persons who had been invited but who had not responded to an invitation for CRC screening in an earlier pilot project. The intervention group received a mailed gFOBT kit and second mailed CRC screening invitation (n?=?2,008) while the control group received a second mailed CRC screening invitation alone (n?=?1,586). The primary outcome was the uptake of gFOBT within 6 months of the second mailing. We found that the uptake of gFOBT was more than twice as high in the intervention group (20.1%) compared to the control group (9.6%). The absolute difference between the two groups was 10.5% (95% CI: 7.5-13.4%, p???0.0001). In a subsequent adjusted analysis, participants in the intervention group were twice as likely to complete the test as those in the control group (OR?=?2.1; 95% CI: 1.6-2.6). These findings suggest that directly mailed gFOBT kits increase CRC screening participation among previous nonresponders to a mailed invitation and that approximately 10 gFOBT kits would have to be sent by mail in order to screen 1 additional person. (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01629004).
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Rare key functional domain missense substitutions in MRE11A, RAD50, and NBN contribute to breast cancer susceptibility: results from a Breast Cancer Family Registry case-control mutation-screening study.
Breast Cancer Res.
PUBLISHED: 05-08-2014
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The MRE11A-RAD50-Nibrin (MRN) complex plays several critical roles related to repair of DNA double-strand breaks. Inherited mutations in the three components predispose to genetic instability disorders and the MRN genes have been implicated in breast cancer susceptibility, but the underlying data are not entirely convincing. Here, we address two related questions: (1) are some rare MRN variants intermediate-risk breast cancer susceptibility alleles, and if so (2) do the MRN genes follow a BRCA1/BRCA2 pattern wherein most susceptibility alleles are protein-truncating variants, or do they follow an ATM/CHEK2 pattern wherein half or more of the susceptibility alleles are missense substitutions?
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Rare mutations in RINT1 predispose carriers to breast and Lynch syndrome-spectrum cancers.
Cancer Discov
PUBLISHED: 05-02-2014
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Approximately half of the familial aggregation of breast cancer remains unexplained. A multiple-case breast cancer family exome-sequencing study identified three likely pathogenic mutations in RINT1 (NM_021930.4) not present in public sequencing databases: RINT1 c.343C>T (p.Q115X), c.1132_1134del (p.M378del), and c.1207G>T (p.D403Y). On the basis of this finding, a population-based case-control mutation-screening study was conducted that identified 29 carriers of rare (minor allele frequency < 0.5%), likely pathogenic variants: 23 in 1,313 early-onset breast cancer cases and six in 1,123 frequency-matched controls [OR, 3.24; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.29-8.17; P = 0.013]. RINT1 mutation screening of probands from 798 multiple-case breast cancer families identified four additional carriers of rare genetic variants. Analysis of the incidence of first primary cancers in families of women carrying RINT1 mutations estimated that carriers were at increased risk of Lynch syndrome-spectrum cancers [standardized incidence ratio (SIR), 3.35; 95% CI, 1.7-6.0; P = 0.005], particularly for relatives diagnosed with cancer under the age of 60 years (SIR, 10.9; 95% CI, 4.7-21; P = 0.0003).
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HIV-1 transcriptional regulation in the central nervous system and implications for HIV cure research.
J. Neurovirol.
PUBLISHED: 04-27-2014
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Human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) invades the central nervous system (CNS) during acute infection which can result in HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders in up to 50 % of patients, even in the presence of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). Within the CNS, productive HIV-1 infection occurs in the perivascular macrophages and microglia. Astrocytes also become infected, although their infection is restricted and does not give rise to new viral particles. The major barrier to the elimination of HIV-1 is the establishment of viral reservoirs in different anatomical sites throughout the body and viral persistence during long-term treatment with cART. While the predominant viral reservoir is believed to be resting CD4(+) T cells in the blood, other anatomical compartments including the CNS, gut-associated lymphoid tissue, bone marrow, and genital tract can also harbour persistently infected cellular reservoirs of HIV-1. Viral latency is predominantly responsible for HIV-1 persistence and is most likely governed at the transcriptional level. Current clinical trials are testing transcriptional activators, in the background of cART, in an attempt to purge these viral reservoirs and reverse viral latency. These strategies aim to activate viral transcription in cells constituting the viral reservoir, so they can be recognised and cleared by the immune system, while new rounds of infection are blocked by co-administration of cART. The CNS has several unique characteristics that may result in differences in viral transcription and in the way latency is established. These include CNS-specific cell types, different transcription factors, altered immune surveillance, and reduced antiretroviral drug bioavailability. A comprehensive understanding of viral transcription and latency in the CNS is required in order to determine treatment outcomes when using transcriptional activators within the CNS.
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Genome wide association study identifies a novel putative mammographic density locus at 1q12-q21.
Int. J. Cancer
PUBLISHED: 04-07-2014
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Mammographic density (MD) is an intermediate phenotype for breast cancer. Previous studies have identified genetic variants associated with MD; however, much of the genetic contribution to MD is unexplained. We conducted a two-stage genome-wide association analysis among the participants in the "Determinants of Density in Mammographies in Spain" study, together with a replication analysis in women from the Australian MD Twins and Sisters Study. Our discovery set covered a total of 3,351 Caucasian women aged 45 to 68 years, recruited from Spanish breast cancer screening centres. MD was blindly assessed by a single reader using Boyd's scale. A two-stage approach was employed, including a feature selection phase exploring 575,374 SNPs in 239 pairs of women with extreme phenotypes and a verification stage for the 183 selected SNPs in the remaining sample (2,873 women). Replication was conducted in 1,786 women aged 40 to 70 years old recruited via the Australian Twin Registry, where MD were measured using Cumulus-3.0, assessing 14 SNPs with a p value <0.10 in stage 2. Finally, two genetic variants in high linkage disequilibrium with our best hit were studied using the whole Spanish sample. Evidence of association with MD was found for variant rs11205277 (OR?=?0.74; 95% CI?=?0.67-0.81; p?=?1.33 × 10(-10) ). In replication analysis, only a marginal association between this SNP and absolute dense area was found. There were also evidence of association between MD and SNPs in high linkage disequilibrium with rs11205277, rs11205303 in gene MTMR11 (OR?=?0.73; 95% CI?=?0.66-0.80; p?=?2.64 × 10(-11) ) and rs67807996 in gene OTUD7B (OR?=?0.72; 95% CI?=?0.66-0.80; p?=?2.03 × 10(-11) ). Our findings provide additional evidence on common genetic variations that may contribute to MD.
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GRA25 is a novel virulence factor of Toxoplasma gondii and influences the host immune response.
Infect. Immun.
PUBLISHED: 04-07-2014
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The obligate intracellular parasite Toxoplasma gondii is able to infect a broad range of hosts and cell types due, in part, to the diverse arsenal of effectors it secretes into the host cell. Here, using genetic crosses between type II and type III Toxoplasma strains and quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping of the changes they induce in macrophage gene expression, we identify a novel dense granule protein, GRA25. Encoded on chromosome IX, GRA25 is a phosphoprotein that is secreted outside the parasites and is found within the parasitophorous vacuole. In vitro experiments with a type II ?gra25 strain showed that macrophages infected with this strain secrete lower levels of CCL2 and CXCL1 than those infected with the wild-type or complemented control parasites. In vivo experiments showed that mice infected with a type II ?gra25 strain are able to survive an otherwise lethal dose of Toxoplasma tachyzoites and that complementation of the mutant with an ectopic copy of GRA25 largely rescues this phenotype. Interestingly, the type II and type III versions of GRA25 differ in endogenous expression levels; however, both are able to promote parasite expansion in vivo when expressed in a type II ?gra25 strain. These data establish GRA25 as a novel virulence factor and immune modulator.
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Investigation of gene-environment interactions between 47 newly identified breast cancer susceptibility loci and environmental risk factors.
Int. J. Cancer
PUBLISHED: 04-03-2014
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A large genotyping project within the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC) recently identified 41 associations between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and overall breast cancer (BC) risk. We investigated whether the effects of these 41 SNPs, as well as six SNPs associated with estrogen receptor (ER) negative BC risk are modified by 13 environmental risk factors for BC. Data from 22 studies participating in BCAC were pooled, comprising up to 26,633 cases and 30,119 controls. Interactions between SNPs and environmental factors were evaluated using an empirical Bayes-type shrinkage estimator. Six SNPs showed interactions with associated p-values (pint ) <1.1 × 10(-3) . None of the observed interactions was significant after accounting for multiple testing. The Bayesian False Discovery Probability was used to rank the findings, which indicated three interactions as being noteworthy at 1% prior probability of interaction. SNP rs6828523 was associated with increased ER-negative BC risk in women ?170 cm (OR = 1.22, p = 0.017), but inversely associated with ER-negative BC risk in women <160 cm (OR = 0.83, p = 0.039, pint = 1.9 × 10(-4) ). The inverse association between rs4808801 and overall BC risk was stronger for women who had had four or more pregnancies (OR = 0.85, p = 2.0 × 10(-4) ), and absent in women who had had just one (OR = 0.96, p = 0.19, pint = 6.1 × 10(-4) ). SNP rs11242675 was inversely associated with overall BC risk in never/former smokers (OR = 0.93, p = 2.8 × 10(-5) ), but no association was observed in current smokers (OR = 1.07, p = 0.14, pint = 3.4 × 10(-4) ). In conclusion, recently identified BC susceptibility loci are not strongly modified by established risk factors and the observed potential interactions require confirmation in independent studies.
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Shear forces enhance Toxoplasma gondii tachyzoite motility on vascular endothelium.
MBio
PUBLISHED: 04-03-2014
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Toxoplasma gondii is a highly successful parasite that infects approximately one-third of the human population and can cause fatal disease in immunocompromised individuals. Systemic parasite dissemination to organs such as the brain and eye is critical to pathogenesis. T. gondii can disseminate via the circulation, and both intracellular and extracellular modes of transport have been proposed. However, the processes by which extracellular tachyzoites adhere to and migrate across vascular endothelium under the conditions of rapidly flowing blood remain unknown. We used microfluidics and time-lapse fluorescence microscopy to examine the interactions between extracellular T. gondii and primary human endothelial cells under conditions of physiologic shear stress. Remarkably, tachyzoites adhered to and glided on human vascular endothelium under shear stress conditions. Compared to static conditions, shear stress enhanced T. gondii helical gliding, resulting in a significantly greater displacement, and increased the percentage of tachyzoites that invaded or migrated across the endothelium. The intensity of the shear forces (from 0.5 to 10 dynes/cm(2)) influenced both initial and sustained adhesion to endothelium. By examining tachyzoites deficient in the T. gondii adhesion protein MIC2, we found that MIC2 contributed to initial adhesion but was not required for adhesion strengthening. These data suggest that under fluidic conditions, T. gondii adhesion to endothelium may be mediated by a multistep cascade of interactions that is governed by unique combinations of adhesion molecules. This work provides novel information about tachyzoite interactions with vascular endothelium and contributes to our understanding of T. gondii dissemination in the infected host. IMPORTANCE Toxoplasma gondii is a global parasite pathogen that can cause fatal disease in immunocompromised individuals. An unresolved question is how the parasites circulate in the body to tissues to cause disease. T. gondii parasites are found in the bloodstream of infected animals and patients, and they have been shown to adhere to and cross the endothelial cells that line blood vessel walls. To investigate these interactions, we devised a microfluidic system to visualize parasites interacting with vascular endothelium under conditions similar to those found in the bloodstream. Interestingly, parasite migration was significantly influenced by the mechanical force of shear flow. Furthermore, we identified a role for the parasite surface protein MIC2 in the initial phase of adhesion. Our study is the first to document T. gondii interactions with endothelium under shear stress conditions and provides a foundation for future studies on the molecules that mediate parasite interaction with the vasculature.
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A framework of the desirable features of guideline implementation tools (GItools): Delphi survey and assessment of GItools.
Implement Sci
PUBLISHED: 04-01-2014
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Guidelines are the foundation for healthcare planning, delivery and quality improvement but are not consistently implemented. Few guidelines are accompanied by guideline implementation tools (GItools). Users have requested GItools, and developers have requested guidance on how to develop GItools. First it is necessary to characterize GItools. The purpose of this research was to generate a framework of desirable features of GItools.
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Genetic predisposition to in situ and invasive lobular carcinoma of the breast.
Elinor Sawyer, Rebecca Roylance, Christos Petridis, Mark N Brook, Salpie Nowinski, Efterpi Papouli, Olivia Fletcher, Sarah Pinder, Andrew Hanby, Kelly Kohut, Patricia Gorman, Michele Caneppele, Julian Peto, Isabel Dos Santos Silva, Nichola Johnson, Ruth Swann, Miriam Dwek, Katherine-Anne Perkins, Cheryl Gillett, Richard Houlston, Gillian Ross, Paolo De Ieso, Melissa C Southey, John L Hopper, Elena Provenzano, Carmel Apicella, Jelle Wesseling, Sten Cornelissen, Renske Keeman, Peter A Fasching, Sebastian M Jud, Arif B Ekici, Matthias W Beckmann, Michael J Kerin, Federick Marme, Andreas Schneeweiss, Christof Sohn, Barbara Burwinkel, Pascal Guénel, Thérèse Truong, Pierre Laurent-Puig, Pierre Kerbrat, Stig E Bojesen, Børge G Nordestgaard, Sune F Nielsen, Henrik Flyger, Roger L Milne, Jose Ignacio Arias Perez, Primitiva Menéndez, Javier Benitez, Hermann Brenner, Aida Karina Dieffenbach, Volker Arndt, Christa Stegmaier, Alfons Meindl, Peter Lichtner, Rita K Schmutzler, Magdalena Lochmann, Hiltrud Brauch, Hans-Peter Fischer, Yon-Dschun Ko, , Heli Nevanlinna, Taru A Muranen, Kristiina Aittomäki, Carl Blomqvist, Natalia V Bogdanova, Thilo Dörk, Annika Lindblom, Sara Margolin, Arto Mannermaa, Vesa Kataja, Veli-Matti Kosma, Jaana M Hartikainen, Georgia Chenevix-Trench, Kconfab Investigators, Diether Lambrechts, Caroline Weltens, Erik Van Limbergen, Sigrid Hatse, Jenny Chang-Claude, Anja Rudolph, Petra Seibold, Dieter Flesch-Janys, Paolo Radice, Paolo Peterlongo, Bernardo Bonanni, Sara Volorio, Graham G Giles, Gianluca Severi, Laura Baglietto, Catriona A McLean, Christopher A Haiman, Brian E Henderson, Fredrick Schumacher, Loic Le Marchand, Jacques Simard, Mark S Goldberg, France Labrèche, Martine Dumont, Vessela Kristensen, Robert Winqvist, Katri Pylkäs, Arja Jukkola-Vuorinen, Saila Kauppila, Irene L Andrulis, Julia A Knight, Gord Glendon, Anna Marie Mulligan, Peter Devillee, Rob A E M Tollenaar, Caroline M Seynaeve, Mieke Kriege, Jonine Figueroa, Stephen J Chanock, Mark E Sherman, Maartje J Hooning, Antoinette Hollestelle, Ans M W van den Ouweland, Carolien H M van Deurzen, Jingmei Li, Kamila Czene, Keith Humphreys, Angela Cox, Simon S Cross, Malcolm W R Reed, Mitul Shah, Anna Jakubowska, Jan Lubiński, Katarzyna Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna Durda, Anthony Swerdlow, Alan Ashworth, Nicholas Orr, Minouk Schoemaker, Fergus J Couch, Emily Hallberg, Anna González-Neira, Guillermo Pita, M Rosario Alonso, Daniel C Tessier, Daniel Vincent, Francois Bacot, Manjeet K Bolla, Qin Wang, Joe Dennis, Kyriaki Michailidou, Alison M Dunning, Per Hall, Doug Easton, Paul Pharoah, Marjanka K Schmidt, Ian Tomlinson, Montserrat Garcia-Closas.
PLoS Genet.
PUBLISHED: 04-01-2014
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Invasive lobular breast cancer (ILC) accounts for 10-15% of all invasive breast carcinomas. It is generally ER positive (ER+) and often associated with lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS). Genome-wide association studies have identified more than 70 common polymorphisms that predispose to breast cancer, but these studies included predominantly ductal (IDC) carcinomas. To identify novel common polymorphisms that predispose to ILC and LCIS, we pooled data from 6,023 cases (5,622 ILC, 401 pure LCIS) and 34,271 controls from 36 studies genotyped using the iCOGS chip. Six novel SNPs most strongly associated with ILC/LCIS in the pooled analysis were genotyped in a further 516 lobular cases (482 ILC, 36 LCIS) and 1,467 controls. These analyses identified a lobular-specific SNP at 7q34 (rs11977670, OR (95%CI) for ILC = 1.13 (1.09-1.18), P = 6.0 × 10(-10); P-het for ILC vs IDC ER+ tumors = 1.8 × 10(-4)). Of the 75 known breast cancer polymorphisms that were genotyped, 56 were associated with ILC and 15 with LCIS at P<0.05. Two SNPs showed significantly stronger associations for ILC than LCIS (rs2981579/10q26/FGFR2, P-het = 0.04 and rs889312/5q11/MAP3K1, P-het = 0.03); and two showed stronger associations for LCIS than ILC (rs6678914/1q32/LGR6, P-het = 0.001 and rs1752911/6q14, P-het = 0.04). In addition, seven of the 75 known loci showed significant differences between ER+ tumors with IDC and ILC histology, three of these showing stronger associations for ILC (rs11249433/1p11, rs2981579/10q26/FGFR2 and rs10995190/10q21/ZNF365) and four associated only with IDC (5p12/rs10941679; rs2588809/14q24/RAD51L1, rs6472903/8q21 and rs1550623/2q31/CDCA7). In conclusion, we have identified one novel lobular breast cancer specific predisposition polymorphism at 7q34, and shown for the first time that common breast cancer polymorphisms predispose to LCIS. We have shown that many of the ER+ breast cancer predisposition loci also predispose to ILC, although there is some heterogeneity between ER+ lobular and ER+ IDC tumors. These data provide evidence for overlapping, but distinct etiological pathways within ER+ breast cancer between morphological subtypes.
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Utilizing Physician Screening Questions for Detecting Anxiety Among Food-Allergic Pediatric Patients.
Clin Pediatr (Phila)
PUBLISHED: 04-01-2014
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Objective. To explore the utility of clinician screening for anxiety in pediatric food-allergic patients. Study Design. In Phase I, 39 patients completed an anxiety questionnaire while their allergists completed a companion questionnaire estimating their patient's responses. Allergists then attended an educational workshop to improve their anxiety detection. In Phase II, following the workshop, questionnaires were completed by an additional 39 patients and their allergists. Results. The percentage of clinician questionnaires with a "do not know" response decreased from 70% to 5% after the workshop. Correlation between allergists' and children's responses remained nonsignificant (r = .314, P = .321) before the workshop and after (r = .303, P = .068) and only 25% of patients who reported elevated anxiety were identified. Additionally, clinicians expressed poor acceptability of the screening. Conclusions. After the workshop, clinicians did not more accurately detect anxiety and found the process intrusive. Alternative methods for uncovering anxiety among high-risk patients are needed.
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A three-protein biomarker panel assessed in diagnostic tissue predicts death from prostate cancer for men with localized disease.
Cancer Med
PUBLISHED: 03-24-2014
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Only a minority of prostate cancers lead to death. Because no tissue biomarkers of aggressiveness other than Gleason score are available at diagnosis, many nonlethal cancers are treated aggressively. We evaluated whether a panel of biomarkers, associated with a range of disease outcomes in previous studies, could predict death from prostate cancer for men with localized disease. Using a case-only design, subjects were identified from three Australian epidemiological studies. Men who had died of their disease, "cases" (N = 83), were matched to "referents" (N = 232), those who had not died of prostate cancer, using incidence density sampling. Diagnostic tissue was retrieved to assess expression of AZGP1, MUC1, NKX3.1, p53, and PTEN by semiquantitative immunohistochemistry (IHC). Poisson regression was used to estimate mortality rate ratios (MRRs) adjusted for age, Gleason score, and stage and to estimate survival probabilities. Expression of MUC1 and p53 was associated with increased mortality (MRR 2.51, 95% CI 1.14-5.54, P = 0.02 and 3.08, 95% CI 1.41-6.95, P = 0.005, respectively), whereas AZGP1 expression was associated with decreased mortality (MRR 0.44, 95% CI 0.20-0.96, P = 0.04). Analyzing all markers under a combined model indicated that the three markers were independent predictors of prostate cancer death and survival. For men with localized disease at diagnosis, assessment of AZGP1, MUC1, and p53 expression in diagnostic tissue by IHC could potentially improve estimates of risk of dying from prostate cancer based only on Gleason score and clinical stage.
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Genome-wide association study identifies multiple loci associated with both mammographic density and breast cancer risk.
Nat Commun
PUBLISHED: 03-14-2014
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Mammographic density reflects the amount of stromal and epithelial tissues in relation to adipose tissue in the breast and is a strong risk factor for breast cancer. Here we report the results from meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of three mammographic density phenotypes: dense area, non-dense area and percent density in up to 7,916 women in stage 1 and an additional 10,379 women in stage 2. We identify genome-wide significant (P<5 × 10(-8)) loci for dense area (AREG, ESR1, ZNF365, LSP1/TNNT3, IGF1, TMEM184B and SGSM3/MKL1), non-dense area (8p11.23) and percent density (PRDM6, 8p11.23 and TMEM184B). Four of these regions are known breast cancer susceptibility loci, and four additional regions were found to be associated with breast cancer (P<0.05) in a large meta-analysis. These results provide further evidence of a shared genetic basis between mammographic density and breast cancer and illustrate the power of studying intermediate quantitative phenotypes to identify putative disease-susceptibility loci.
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Evidence that breast cancer risk at the 2q35 locus is mediated through IGFBP5 regulation.
Maya Ghoussaini, Stacey L Edwards, Kyriaki Michailidou, Silje Nord, Richard Cowper-Sal Lari, Kinjal Desai, Siddhartha Kar, Kristine M Hillman, Susanne Kaufmann, Dylan M Glubb, Jonathan Beesley, Joe Dennis, Manjeet K Bolla, Qin Wang, Ed Dicks, Qi Guo, Marjanka K Schmidt, Mitul Shah, Robert Luben, Judith Brown, Kamila Czene, Hatef Darabi, Mikael Eriksson, Daniel Klevebring, Stig E Bojesen, Børge G Nordestgaard, Sune F Nielsen, Henrik Flyger, Diether Lambrechts, Bernard Thienpont, Patrick Neven, Hans Wildiers, Annegien Broeks, Laura J Van't Veer, Emiel J Th Rutgers, Fergus J Couch, Janet E Olson, Emily Hallberg, Celine Vachon, Jenny Chang-Claude, Anja Rudolph, Petra Seibold, Dieter Flesch-Janys, Julian Peto, Isabel Dos-Santos-Silva, Lorna Gibson, Heli Nevanlinna, Taru A Muranen, Kristiina Aittomäki, Carl Blomqvist, Per Hall, Jingmei Li, Jianjun Liu, Keith Humphreys, Daehee Kang, Ji-Yeob Choi, Sue K Park, Dong-Young Noh, Keitaro Matsuo, Hidemi Ito, Hiroji Iwata, Yasushi Yatabe, Pascal Guénel, Thérèse Truong, Florence Menegaux, Marie Sanchez, Barbara Burwinkel, Frederik Marme, Andreas Schneeweiss, Christof Sohn, Anna H Wu, Chiu-Chen Tseng, David Van Den Berg, Daniel O Stram, Javier Benitez, M Pilar Zamora, Jose Ignacio Arias Perez, Primitiva Menéndez, Xiao-Ou Shu, Wei Lu, Yu-Tang Gao, Qiuyin Cai, Angela Cox, Simon S Cross, Malcolm W R Reed, Irene L Andrulis, Julia A Knight, Gord Glendon, Sandrine Tchatchou, Elinor J Sawyer, Ian Tomlinson, Michael J Kerin, Nicola Miller, Christopher A Haiman, Brian E Henderson, Fredrick Schumacher, Loic Le Marchand, Annika Lindblom, Sara Margolin, Soo Hwang Teo, Cheng Har Yip, Daphne S C Lee, Tien Y Wong, Maartje J Hooning, John W M Martens, J Margriet Collée, Carolien H M van Deurzen, John L Hopper, Melissa C Southey, Helen Tsimiklis, Miroslav K Kapuscinski, Chen-Yang Shen, Pei-Ei Wu, Jyh-Cherng Yu, Shou-Tung Chen, Grethe Grenaker Alnæs, Anne-Lise Borresen-Dale, Graham G Giles, Roger L Milne, Catriona McLean, Kenneth Muir, Artitaya Lophatananon, Sarah Stewart-Brown, Pornthep Siriwanarangsan, Mikael Hartman, Hui Miao, Shaik Ahmad Bin Syed Buhari, Yik Ying Teo, Peter A Fasching, Lothar Haeberle, Arif B Ekici, Matthias W Beckmann, Hermann Brenner, Aida Karina Dieffenbach, Volker Arndt, Christa Stegmaier, Anthony Swerdlow, Alan Ashworth, Nick Orr, Minouk J Schoemaker, Montserrat Garcia-Closas, Jonine Figueroa, Stephen J Chanock, Jolanta Lissowska, Jacques Simard, Mark S Goldberg, France Labrèche, Martine Dumont, Robert Winqvist, Katri Pylkäs, Arja Jukkola-Vuorinen, Hiltrud Brauch, Thomas Brüning, Yon-Dschun Koto, Paolo Radice, Paolo Peterlongo, Bernardo Bonanni, Sara Volorio, Thilo Dörk, Natalia V Bogdanova, Sonja Helbig, Arto Mannermaa, Vesa Kataja, Veli-Matti Kosma, Jaana M Hartikainen, Peter Devilee, Robert A E M Tollenaar, Caroline Seynaeve, Christi J van Asperen, Anna Jakubowska, Jan Lubiński, Katarzyna Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna Durda, Susan Slager, Amanda E Toland, Christine B Ambrosone, Drakoulis Yannoukakos, Suleeporn Sangrajrang, Valerie Gaborieau, Paul Brennan, James McKay, Ute Hamann, Diana Torres, Wei Zheng, Jirong Long, Hoda Anton-Culver, Susan L Neuhausen, Craig Luccarini, Caroline Baynes, Shahana Ahmed, Mel Maranian, Catherine S Healey, Anna González-Neira, Guillermo Pita, M Rosario Alonso, Nuria Alvarez, Daniel Herrero, Daniel C Tessier, Daniel Vincent, Francois Bacot, Ines de Santiago, Jason Carroll, Carlos Caldas, Melissa A Brown, Mathieu Lupien, Vessela N Kristensen, Paul D P Pharoah, Georgia Chenevix-Trench, Juliet D French, Douglas F Easton, Alison M Dunning, .
Nat Commun
PUBLISHED: 03-12-2014
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GWAS have identified a breast cancer susceptibility locus on 2q35. Here we report the fine mapping of this locus using data from 101,943 subjects from 50 case-control studies. We genotype 276 SNPs using the 'iCOGS' genotyping array and impute genotypes for a further 1,284 using 1000 Genomes Project data. All but two, strongly correlated SNPs (rs4442975 G/T and rs6721996 G/A) are excluded as candidate causal variants at odds against >100:1. The best functional candidate, rs4442975, is associated with oestrogen receptor positive (ER+) disease with an odds ratio (OR) in Europeans of 0.85 (95% confidence interval=0.84-0.87; P=1.7 × 10(-43)) per t-allele. This SNP flanks a transcriptional enhancer that physically interacts with the promoter of IGFBP5 (encoding insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 5) and displays allele-specific gene expression, FOXA1 binding and chromatin looping. Evidence suggests that the g-allele confers increased breast cancer susceptibility through relative downregulation of IGFBP5, a gene with known roles in breast cell biology.
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A mixed methods approach to understand variation in lung cancer practice and the role of guidelines.
Implement Sci
PUBLISHED: 03-10-2014
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Practice pattern data demonstrate regional variation and lower than expected rates of adherence to practice guideline (PG) recommendations for the treatment of stage II/IIIA resected and stage IIIA/IIIB unresected non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients in Ontario, Canada. This study sought to understand how clinical decisions are made for the treatment of these patients and the role of PGs.
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Sustained localized presentation of RNA interfering molecules from in situ forming hydrogels to guide stem cell osteogenic differentiation.
Biomaterials
PUBLISHED: 03-04-2014
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To date, RNA interfering molecules have been used to differentiate stem cells on two-dimensional (2D) substrates that do not mimic three-dimensional (3D) microenvironments in the body. Here, in situ forming poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hydrogels were engineered for controlled, localized and sustained delivery of RNA interfering molecules to differentiate stem cells encapsulated within the 3D polymer network. RNA interfering molecules were released from the hydrogels in a sustained and controlled manner over the course of 3-6 weeks, and exhibited high bioactivity. Importantly, it was demonstrated that the delivery of siRNA and/or miRNA from the hydrogel constructs enhanced the osteogenic differentiation of encapsulated stem cells. Prolonged delivery of siRNA and/or miRNA from this polymeric scaffold permitted extended regulation of cell behavior, unlike traditional siRNA experiments performed in vitro. This approach presents a powerful new methodology for controlling cell fate, and is promising for multiple applications in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine.
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How does context influence collaborative decision-making for health services planning, delivery and evaluation?
BMC Health Serv Res
PUBLISHED: 02-13-2014
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BackgroundCollaboration among researchers (clinician, non-clinician) and decision makers (managers, policy-makers, clinicians), referred to as integrated knowledge translation (IKT), enhances the relevance and use of research, leading to improved decision-making, policies, practice, and health care outcomes. However IKT is not widely practiced due to numerous challenges. This research explored how context influenced IKT as a means of identifying how IKT could be strengthened.MethodsThis research investigated IKT in three health services programs for colon cancer screening, prostate cancer diagnosis, and the treatment of pancreatic cancer. Qualitative methods were used to explore contextual factors that influenced how IKT occurred, and its impact. Data were collected between September 1, 2012 and May 15, 2013 from relevant documents, observation of meetings, and interviews with researchers and decision-makers, analyzed using qualitative methods, and integrated.ResultsData were analyzed from 39 documents, observation of 6 meetings, and 36 interviews. IKT included interaction at meetings, joint undertaking of research, and development of guidelines. IKT was most prevalent in one program with leadership, clear goals, dedicated funding and other infrastructural resources, and an embedded researcher responsible for, and actively engaged in IKT. This program achieved a variety of social, research and health service outcomes despite mixed individual views about the value of IKT and the absence of a programmatic culture of IKT. Participants noted numerous challenges including lack of time and incentives, and recommendations to support IKT. A conceptual framework of factors that influence IKT and associated outcomes was generated, and can be used by others to plan or evaluate IKT.ConclusionsThe findings can be applied by researchers, clinicians, managers or policy-makers to plan or improve collaborative decision-making for health services planning, delivery, evaluation or quality improvement. Further research is needed to explore whether these findings are widespread, and further understand how IKT can be optimized.
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Quantifying susceptibility of CD4+ stem memory T-cells to infection by laboratory adapted and clinical HIV-1 strains.
Viruses
PUBLISHED: 02-05-2014
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CD4+ T cells are principal targets for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection. CD4+ T cell subsets are heterogeneous cell populations, divided by functional and phenotypic differences into naïve and memory T cells. The memory CD4+ T cells are further segregated into central, effector and transitional memory cell subsets by functional, phenotypic and homeostatic characteristics. Defining the distribution of HIV-1 infection in different T cell subsets is important, as this can play a role in determining the size and composition of the viral reservoir. Both central memory and transitional memory CD4+ T cells have been described as long-lived viral reservoirs for HIV. Recently, the newly described stem memory T cell subset has also been implicated as a long-lived HIV reservoir. Using green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter strains of HIV-1 and multi parameter flow cytometry, we developed an assay to simultaneously quantify the susceptibility of stem memory (TSCM), central memory, effector memory, transitional memory and naïve CD4+ T cell subsets, to HIV-1 infection in vitro. We show that TSCM are susceptible to infection with laboratory adapted and clinical HIV-1 strains. Our system facilitates the quantitation of HIV-1 infection in alternative T cell subsets by CCR5- and CXCR4-using viruses across different HIV-1 subtypes, and will be useful for studies of HIV-1 pathogenesis and viral reservoirs.
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Consortium analysis of gene and gene-folate interactions in purine and pyrimidine metabolism pathways with ovarian carcinoma risk.
Linda E Kelemen, Kathryn L Terry, Marc T Goodman, Penelope M Webb, Elisa V Bandera, Valerie McGuire, Mary Anne Rossing, Qinggang Wang, Ed Dicks, Jonathan P Tyrer, Honglin Song, Jolanta Kupryjanczyk, Agnieszka Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Joanna Plisiecka-Halasa, Agnieszka Timorek, Usha Menon, Aleksandra Gentry-Maharaj, Simon A Gayther, Susan J Ramus, Steven A Narod, Harvey A Risch, John R McLaughlin, Nadeem Siddiqui, Rosalind Glasspool, James Paul, Karen Carty, Jacek Gronwald, Jan Lubiński, Anna Jakubowska, Cezary Cybulski, Lambertus A Kiemeney, Leon F A G Massuger, Anne M Van Altena, Katja K H Aben, Sara H Olson, Irene Orlow, Daniel W Cramer, Douglas A Levine, Maria Bisogna, Graham G Giles, Melissa C Southey, Fiona Bruinsma, Susanne K Kjaer, Estrid Høgdall, Allan Jensen, Claus K Høgdall, Lene Lundvall, Svend-Aage Engelholm, Florian Heitz, Andreas du Bois, Philipp Harter, Ira Schwaab, Ralf Bützow, Heli Nevanlinna, Liisa M Pelttari, Arto Leminen, Pamela J Thompson, Galina Lurie, Lynne R Wilkens, Diether Lambrechts, Els Van Nieuwenhuysen, Sandrina Lambrechts, Ignace Vergote, Jonathan Beesley, , Peter A Fasching, Matthias W Beckmann, Alexander Hein, Arif B Ekici, Jennifer A Doherty, Anna H Wu, Celeste L Pearce, Malcolm C Pike, Daniel Stram, Jenny Chang-Claude, Anja Rudolph, Thilo Dörk, Matthias Dürst, Peter Hillemanns, Ingo B Runnebaum, Natalia Bogdanova, Natalia Antonenkova, Kunle Odunsi, Robert P Edwards, Joseph L Kelley, Francesmary Modugno, Roberta B Ness, Beth Y Karlan, Christine Walsh, Jenny Lester, Sandra Orsulic, Brooke L Fridley, Robert A Vierkant, Julie M Cunningham, Xifeng Wu, Karen Lu, Dong Liang, Michelle A T Hildebrandt, Rachel Palmieri Weber, Edwin S Iversen, Shelley S Tworoger, Elizabeth M Poole, Helga B Salvesen, Camilla Krakstad, Line Bjorge, Ingvild L Tangen, Tanja Pejovic, Yukie Bean, Melissa Kellar, Nicolas Wentzensen, Louise A Brinton, Jolanta Lissowska, Montserrat Garcia-Closas, Ian G Campbell, Diana Eccles, Alice S Whittemore, Weiva Sieh, Joseph H Rothstein, Hoda Anton-Culver, Argyrios Ziogas, Catherine M Phelan, Kirsten B Moysich, Ellen L Goode, Joellen M Schildkraut, Andrew Berchuck, Paul D P Pharoah, Thomas A Sellers, Angela Brooks-Wilson, Linda S Cook, Nhu D Le.
Mol Nutr Food Res
PUBLISHED: 02-01-2014
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We reevaluated previously reported associations between variants in pathways of one-carbon (1-C) (folate) transfer genes and ovarian carcinoma (OC) risk, and in related pathways of purine and pyrimidine metabolism, and assessed interactions with folate intake.
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2q36.3 is associated with prognosis for oestrogen receptor-negative breast cancer patients treated with chemotherapy.
Jingmei Li, Linda S Lindström, Jia N Foo, Sajjad Rafiq, Marjanka K Schmidt, Paul D P Pharoah, Kyriaki Michailidou, Joe Dennis, Manjeet K Bolla, Qin Wang, Laura J van 't Veer, Sten Cornelissen, Emiel Rutgers, Melissa C Southey, Carmel Apicella, Gillian S Dite, John L Hopper, Peter A Fasching, Lothar Haeberle, Arif B Ekici, Matthias W Beckmann, Carl Blomqvist, Taru A Muranen, Kristiina Aittomäki, Annika Lindblom, Sara Margolin, Arto Mannermaa, Veli-Matti Kosma, Jaana M Hartikainen, Vesa Kataja, Georgia Chenevix-Trench, , Kelly-Anne Phillips, Sue-Anne McLachlan, Diether Lambrechts, Bernard Thienpont, Ann Smeets, Hans Wildiers, Jenny Chang-Claude, Dieter Flesch-Janys, Petra Seibold, Anja Rudolph, Graham G Giles, Laura Baglietto, Gianluca Severi, Christopher A Haiman, Brian E Henderson, Fredrick Schumacher, Loic Le Marchand, Vessela Kristensen, Grethe I Grenaker Alnæs, Anne-Lise Borresen-Dale, Silje Nord, Robert Winqvist, Katri Pylkäs, Arja Jukkola-Vuorinen, Mervi Grip, Irene L Andrulis, Julia A Knight, Gord Glendon, Sandrine Tchatchou, Peter Devilee, Robert Tollenaar, Caroline Seynaeve, Maartje Hooning, Mieke Kriege, Antoinette Hollestelle, Ans van den Ouweland, Yi Li, Ute Hamann, Diana Torres, Hans U Ulmer, Thomas Rüdiger, Chen-Yang Shen, Chia-Ni Hsiung, Pei-Ei Wu, Shou-Tung Chen, Soo Hwang Teo, Nur Aishah Mohd Taib, Cheng Har Yip, Gwo Fuang Ho, Keitaro Matsuo, Hidemi Ito, Hiroji Iwata, Kazuo Tajima, Daehee Kang, Ji-Yeob Choi, Sue K Park, Keun-Young Yoo, Tom Maishman, William J Tapper, Alison Dunning, Mitul Shah, Robert Luben, Judith Brown, Chiea Chuen Khor, Diana M Eccles, Heli Nevanlinna, Douglas Easton, Keith Humphreys, Jianjun Liu, Per Hall, Kamila Czene.
Nat Commun
PUBLISHED: 01-28-2014
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Large population-based registry studies have shown that breast cancer prognosis is inherited. Here we analyse single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of genes implicated in human immunology and inflammation as candidates for prognostic markers of breast cancer survival involving 1,804 oestrogen receptor (ER)-negative patients treated with chemotherapy (279 events) from 14 European studies in a prior large-scale genotyping experiment, which is part of the Collaborative Oncological Gene-environment Study (COGS) initiative. We carry out replication using Asian COGS samples (n=522, 53 events) and the Prospective Study of Outcomes in Sporadic versus Hereditary breast cancer (POSH) study (n=315, 108 events). Rs4458204_A near CCL20 (2q36.3) is found to be associated with breast cancer-specific death at a genome-wide significant level (n=2,641, 440 events, combined allelic hazard ratio (HR)=1.81 (1.49-2.19); P for trend=1.90 × 10(-9)). Such survival-associated variants can represent ideal targets for tailored therapeutics, and may also enhance our current prognostic prediction capabilities.
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How can diagnostic assessment programs be implemented to enhance inter-professional collaborative care for cancer?
Implement Sci
PUBLISHED: 01-03-2014
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Inter-professional collaborative care (ICC) for cancer leads to multiple system, organizational, professional, and patient benefits, but is limited by numerous challenges. Empirical research on interventions that promote or enable ICC is sparse so guidance on how to achieve ICC is lacking. Research shows that ICC for diagnosis could be improved. Diagnostic assessment programs (DAPs) appear to be a promising model for enabling ICC. The purpose of this study was to explore how DAP structure and function enable ICC, and whether that may be associated with organizational and clinical outcomes.
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Ex Vivo Response to Histone Deacetylase (HDAC) Inhibitors of the HIV Long Terminal Repeat (LTR) Derived from HIV-Infected Patients on Antiretroviral Therapy.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2014
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Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) can induce human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) transcription from the HIV long terminal repeat (LTR). However, ex vivo and in vivo responses to HDACi are variable and the activity of HDACi in cells other than T-cells have not been well characterised. Here, we developed a novel assay to determine the activity of HDACi on patient-derived HIV LTRs in different cell types. HIV LTRs from integrated virus were amplified using triple-nested Alu-PCR from total memory CD4+ T-cells (CD45RO+) isolated from HIV-infected patients prior to and following suppressive antiretroviral therapy. NL4-3 or patient-derived HIV LTRs were cloned into the chromatin forming episomal vector pCEP4, and the effect of HDACi investigated in the astrocyte and epithelial cell lines SVG and HeLa, respectively. There were no significant differences in the sequence of the HIV LTRs isolated from CD4+ T-cells prior to and after 18 months of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). We found that in both cell lines, the HDACi panobinostat, trichostatin A, vorinostat and entinostat activated patient-derived HIV LTRs to similar levels seen with NL4-3 and all patient derived isolates had similar sensitivity to maximum HDACi stimulation. We observed a marked difference in the maximum fold induction of luciferase by HDACi in HeLa and SVG, suggesting that the effect of HDACi may be influenced by the cellular environment. Finally, we observed significant synergy in activation of the LTR with vorinostat and the viral protein Tat. Together, our results suggest that the LTR sequence of integrated virus is not a major determinant of a functional response to an HDACi.
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Host, Pathogen, and Environmental Characteristics Predict White-Nose Syndrome Mortality in Captive Little Brown Myotis (Myotis lucifugus).
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2014
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An estimated 5.7 million or more bats died in North America between 2006 and 2012 due to infection with the fungus Pseudogymnoascus destructans (Pd) that causes white-nose syndrome (WNS) during hibernation. The behavioral and physiological changes associated with hibernation leave bats vulnerable to WNS, but the persistence of bats within the contaminated regions of North America suggests that survival might vary predictably among individuals or in relation to environmental conditions. To investigate variables influencing WNS mortality, we conducted a captive study of 147 little brown myotis (Myotis lucifugus) inoculated with 0, 500, 5 000, 50 000, or 500 000 Pd conidia and hibernated for five months at either 4 or 10°C. We found that female bats were significantly more likely to survive hibernation, as were bats hibernated at 4°C, and bats with greater body condition at the start of hibernation. Although all bats inoculated with Pd exhibited shorter torpor bouts compared to controls, a characteristic of WNS, only bats inoculated with 500 conidia had significantly lower survival odds compared to controls. These data show that host and environmental characteristics are significant predictors of WNS mortality, and that exposure to up to 500 conidia is sufficient to cause a fatal infection. These results also illustrate a need to quantify dynamics of Pd exposure in free-ranging bats, as dynamics of WNS produced in captive studies inoculating bats with several hundred thousand conidia may differ from those in the wild.
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MicroRNA Related Polymorphisms and Breast Cancer Risk.
Sofia Khan, Dario Greco, Kyriaki Michailidou, Roger L Milne, Taru A Muranen, Tuomas Heikkinen, Kirsimari Aaltonen, Joe Dennis, Manjeet K Bolla, Jianjun Liu, Per Hall, Astrid Irwanto, Keith Humphreys, Jingmei Li, Kamila Czene, Jenny Chang-Claude, Rebecca Hein, Anja Rudolph, Petra Seibold, Dieter Flesch-Janys, Olivia Fletcher, Julian Peto, Isabel Dos Santos Silva, Nichola Johnson, Lorna Gibson, Zoe Aitken, John L Hopper, Helen Tsimiklis, Minh Bui, Enes Makalic, Daniel F Schmidt, Melissa C Southey, Carmel Apicella, Jennifer Stone, Quinten Waisfisz, Hanne Meijers-Heijboer, Muriel A Adank, Rob B van der Luijt, Alfons Meindl, Rita K Schmutzler, Bertram Müller-Myhsok, Peter Lichtner, Clare Turnbull, Nazneen Rahman, Stephen J Chanock, David J Hunter, Angela Cox, Simon S Cross, Malcolm W R Reed, Marjanka K Schmidt, Annegien Broeks, Laura J V A N't Veer, Frans B Hogervorst, Peter A Fasching, Michael G Schrauder, Arif B Ekici, Matthias W Beckmann, Stig E Bojesen, Børge G Nordestgaard, Sune F Nielsen, Henrik Flyger, Javier Benitez, Pilar M Zamora, Jose I A Perez, Christopher A Haiman, Brian E Henderson, Fredrick Schumacher, Loic Le Marchand, Paul D P Pharoah, Alison M Dunning, Mitul Shah, Robert Luben, Judith Brown, Fergus J Couch, Xianshu Wang, Celine Vachon, Janet E Olson, Diether Lambrechts, Matthieu Moisse, Robert Paridaens, Marie-Rose Christiaens, Pascal Guénel, Thérèse Truong, Pierre Laurent-Puig, Claire Mulot, Frederick Marme, Barbara Burwinkel, Andreas Schneeweiss, Christof Sohn, Elinor J Sawyer, Ian Tomlinson, Michael J Kerin, Nicola Miller, Irene L Andrulis, Julia A Knight, Sandrine Tchatchou, Anna Marie Mulligan, Thilo Dörk, Natalia V Bogdanova, Natalia N Antonenkova, Hoda Anton-Culver, Hatef Darabi, Mikael Eriksson, Montserrat Garcia-Closas, Jonine Figueroa, Jolanta Lissowska, Louise Brinton, Peter Devilee, Robert A E M Tollenaar, Caroline Seynaeve, Christi J van Asperen, Vessela N Kristensen, , Susan Slager, Amanda E Toland, Christine B Ambrosone, Drakoulis Yannoukakos, Annika Lindblom, Sara Margolin, Paolo Radice, Paolo Peterlongo, Monica Barile, Paolo Mariani, Maartje J Hooning, John W M Martens, J Margriet Collée, Agnes Jager, Anna Jakubowska, Jan Lubiński, Katarzyna Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna Durda, Graham G Giles, Catriona McLean, Hiltrud Brauch, Thomas Brüning, Yon-Dschun Ko, Hermann Brenner, Aida Karina Dieffenbach, Volker Arndt, Christa Stegmaier, Anthony Swerdlow, Alan Ashworth, Nick Orr, Michael Jones, Jacques Simard, Mark S Goldberg, France Labrèche, Martine Dumont, Robert Winqvist, Katri Pylkäs, Arja Jukkola-Vuorinen, Mervi Grip, Vesa Kataja, Veli-Matti Kosma, Jaana M Hartikainen, Arto Mannermaa, Ute Hamann, Georgia Chenevix-Trench, Carl Blomqvist, Kristiina Aittomäki, Douglas F Easton, Heli Nevanlinna.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2014
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Genetic variations, such as single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in microRNAs (miRNA) or in the miRNA binding sites may affect the miRNA dependent gene expression regulation, which has been implicated in various cancers, including breast cancer, and may alter individual susceptibility to cancer. We investigated associations between miRNA related SNPs and breast cancer risk. First we evaluated 2,196 SNPs in a case-control study combining nine genome wide association studies (GWAS). Second, we further investigated 42 SNPs with suggestive evidence for association using 41,785 cases and 41,880 controls from 41 studies included in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC). Combining the GWAS and BCAC data within a meta-analysis, we estimated main effects on breast cancer risk as well as risks for estrogen receptor (ER) and age defined subgroups. Five miRNA binding site SNPs associated significantly with breast cancer risk: rs1045494 (odds ratio (OR) 0.92; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.88-0.96), rs1052532 (OR 0.97; 95% CI: 0.95-0.99), rs10719 (OR 0.97; 95% CI: 0.94-0.99), rs4687554 (OR 0.97; 95% CI: 0.95-0.99, and rs3134615 (OR 1.03; 95% CI: 1.01-1.05) located in the 3' UTR of CASP8, HDDC3, DROSHA, MUSTN1, and MYCL1, respectively. DROSHA belongs to miRNA machinery genes and has a central role in initial miRNA processing. The remaining genes are involved in different molecular functions, including apoptosis and gene expression regulation. Further studies are warranted to elucidate whether the miRNA binding site SNPs are the causative variants for the observed risk effects.
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Covariance of Charged Amino Acids at Positions 322 and 440 of HIV-1 Env Contributes to Coreceptor Specificity of Subtype B Viruses, and Can Be Used to Improve the Performance of V3 Sequence-Based Coreceptor Usage Prediction Algorithms.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2014
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The ability to determine coreceptor usage of patient-derived human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) strains is clinically important, particularly for the administration of the CCR5 antagonist maraviroc. The envelope glycoprotein (Env) determinants of coreceptor specificity lie primarily within the gp120 V3 loop region, although other Env determinants have been shown to influence gp120-coreceptor interactions. Here, we determined whether conserved amino acid alterations outside the V3 loop that contribute to coreceptor usage exist, and whether these alterations improve the performance of V3 sequence-based coreceptor usage prediction algorithms. We demonstrate a significant covariant association between charged amino acids at position 322 in V3 and position 440 in the C4 Env region that contributes to the specificity of HIV-1 subtype B strains for CCR5 or CXCR4. Specifically, positively charged Lys/Arg at position 322 and negatively charged Asp/Glu at position 440 occurred more frequently in CXCR4-using viruses, whereas negatively charged Asp/Glu at position 322 and positively charged Arg at position 440 occurred more frequently in R5 strains. In the context of CD4-bound gp120, structural models suggest that covariation of amino acids at Env positions 322 and 440 has the potential to alter electrostatic interactions that are formed between gp120 and charged amino acids in the CCR5 N-terminus. We further demonstrate that inclusion of a "440 rule" can improve the sensitivity of several V3 sequence-based genotypic algorithms for predicting coreceptor usage of subtype B HIV-1 strains, without compromising specificity, and significantly improves the AUROC of the geno2pheno algorithm when set to its recommended false positive rate of 5.75%. Together, our results provide further mechanistic insights into the intra-molecular interactions within Env that contribute to coreceptor specificity of subtype B HIV-1 strains, and demonstrate that incorporation of Env determinants outside V3 can improve the reliability of coreceptor usage prediction algorithms.
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HIV-1 entry and trans-infection of astrocytes involves CD81 vesicles.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2014
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Astrocytes are extensively infected with HIV-1 in vivo and play a significant role in the development of HIV-1-associated neurocognitive disorders. Despite their extensive infection, little is known about how astrocytes become infected, since they lack cell surface CD4 expression. In the present study, we investigated the fate of HIV-1 upon infection of astrocytes. Astrocytes were found to bind and harbor virus followed by biphasic decay, with HIV-1 detectable out to 72 hours. HIV-1 was observed to associate with CD81-lined vesicle structures. shRNA silencing of CD81 resulted in less cell-associated virus but no loss of co-localization between HIV-1 and CD81. Astrocytes supported trans-infection of HIV-1 to T-cells without de novo virus production, and the virus-containing compartment required 37°C to form, and was trypsin-resistant. The CD81 compartment observed herein, has been shown in other cell types to be a relatively protective compartment. Within astrocytes, this compartment may be actively involved in virus entry and/or spread. The ability of astrocytes to transfer virus, without de novo viral synthesis suggests they are capable of sequestering and protecting virus and thus, they could potentially facilitate viral dissemination in the CNS.
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A large-scale assessment of two-way SNP interactions in breast cancer susceptibility using 46 450 cases and 42 461 controls from the breast cancer association consortium.
Roger L Milne, Jesús Herranz, Kyriaki Michailidou, Joe Dennis, Jonathan P Tyrer, M Pilar Zamora, José Ignacio Arias-Perez, Anna González-Neira, Guillermo Pita, M Rosario Alonso, Qin Wang, Manjeet K Bolla, Kamila Czene, Mikael Eriksson, Keith Humphreys, Hatef Darabi, Jingmei Li, Hoda Anton-Culver, Susan L Neuhausen, Argyrios Ziogas, Christina A Clarke, John L Hopper, Gillian S Dite, Carmel Apicella, Melissa C Southey, Georgia Chenevix-Trench, , Anthony Swerdlow, Alan Ashworth, Nicholas Orr, Minouk Schoemaker, Anna Jakubowska, Jan Lubiński, Katarzyna Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna Durda, Irene L Andrulis, Julia A Knight, Gord Glendon, Anna Marie Mulligan, Stig E Bojesen, Børge G Nordestgaard, Henrik Flyger, Heli Nevanlinna, Taru A Muranen, Kristiina Aittomäki, Carl Blomqvist, Jenny Chang-Claude, Anja Rudolph, Petra Seibold, Dieter Flesch-Janys, Xianshu Wang, Janet E Olson, Celine Vachon, Kristen Purrington, Robert Winqvist, Katri Pylkäs, Arja Jukkola-Vuorinen, Mervi Grip, Alison M Dunning, Mitul Shah, Pascal Guénel, Thérèse Truong, Marie Sanchez, Claire Mulot, Hermann Brenner, Aida Karina Dieffenbach, Volker Arndt, Christa Stegmaier, Annika Lindblom, Sara Margolin, Maartje J Hooning, Antoinette Hollestelle, J Margriet Collée, Agnes Jager, Angela Cox, Ian W Brock, Malcolm W R Reed, Peter Devilee, Robert A E M Tollenaar, Caroline Seynaeve, Christopher A Haiman, Brian E Henderson, Fredrick Schumacher, Loic Le Marchand, Jacques Simard, Martine Dumont, Penny Soucy, Thilo Dörk, Natalia V Bogdanova, Ute Hamann, Asta Försti, Thomas Rüdiger, Hans-Ulrich Ulmer, Peter A Fasching, Lothar Häberle, Arif B Ekici, Matthias W Beckmann, Olivia Fletcher, Nichola Johnson, Isabel Dos Santos Silva, Julian Peto, Paolo Radice, Paolo Peterlongo, Bernard Peissel, Paolo Mariani, Graham G Giles, Gianluca Severi, Laura Baglietto, Elinor Sawyer, Ian Tomlinson, Michael Kerin, Nicola Miller, Federik Marme, Barbara Burwinkel, Arto Mannermaa, Vesa Kataja, Veli-Matti Kosma, Jaana M Hartikainen, Diether Lambrechts, Betul T Yesilyurt, Giuseppe Floris, Karin Leunen, Grethe Grenaker Alnæs, Vessela Kristensen, Anne-Lise Børresen-Dale, Montserrat Garcia-Closas, Stephen J Chanock, Jolanta Lissowska, Jonine D Figueroa, Marjanka K Schmidt, Annegien Broeks, Senno Verhoef, Emiel J Rutgers, Hiltrud Brauch, Thomas Brüning, Yon-Dschun Ko, Fergus J Couch, Amanda E Toland, Drakoulis Yannoukakos, Paul D P Pharoah, Per Hall, Javier Benitez, Nuria Malats, Douglas F Easton.
Hum. Mol. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 11-15-2013
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Part of the substantial unexplained familial aggregation of breast cancer may be due to interactions between common variants, but few studies have had adequate statistical power to detect interactions of realistic magnitude. We aimed to assess all two-way interactions in breast cancer susceptibility between 70 917 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) selected primarily based on prior evidence of a marginal effect. Thirty-eight international studies contributed data for 46 450 breast cancer cases and 42 461 controls of European origin as part of a multi-consortium project (COGS). First, SNPs were preselected based on evidence (P < 0.01) of a per-allele main effect, and all two-way combinations of those were evaluated by a per-allele (1 d.f.) test for interaction using logistic regression. Second, all 2.5 billion possible two-SNP combinations were evaluated using Boolean operation-based screening and testing, and SNP pairs with the strongest evidence of interaction (P < 10(-4)) were selected for more careful assessment by logistic regression. Under the first approach, 3277 SNPs were preselected, but an evaluation of all possible two-SNP combinations (1 d.f.) identified no interactions at P < 10(-8). Results from the second analytic approach were consistent with those from the first (P > 10(-10)). In summary, we observed little evidence of two-way SNP interactions in breast cancer susceptibility, despite the large number of SNPs with potential marginal effects considered and the very large sample size. This finding may have important implications for risk prediction, simplifying the modelling required. Further comprehensive, large-scale genome-wide interaction studies may identify novel interacting loci if the inherent logistic and computational challenges can be overcome.
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Comparison of mRNA Splicing Assay Protocols across Multiple Laboratories: Recommendations for Best Practice in Standardized Clinical Testing.
Clin. Chem.
PUBLISHED: 11-08-2013
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Accurate evaluation of unclassified sequence variants in cancer predisposition genes is essential for clinical management and depends on a multifactorial analysis of clinical, genetic, pathologic, and bioinformatic variables and assays of transcript length and abundance. The integrity of assay data in turn relies on appropriate assay design, interpretation, and reporting.METHODS: We conducted a multicenter investigation to compare mRNA splicing assay protocols used by members of the ENIGMA (Evidence-Based Network for the Interpretation of Germline Mutant Alleles) consortium. We compared similarities and differences in results derived from analysis of a panel of breast cancer 1, early onset (BRCA1) and breast cancer 2, early onset (BRCA2) gene variants known to alter splicing (BRCA1: c.135-1G>T, c.591C>T, c.594-2A>C, c.671-2A>G, and c.5467+5G>C and BRCA2: c.426-12_8delGTTTT, c.7988A>T, c.8632+1G>A, and c.9501+3A>T). Differences in protocols were then assessed to determine which elements were critical in reliable assay design.RESULTS: PCR primer design strategies, PCR conditions, and product detection methods, combined with a prior knowledge of expected alternative transcripts, were the key factors for accurate splicing assay results. For example, because of the position of primers and PCR extension times, several isoforms associated with BRCA1, c.594-2A>C and c.671-2A>G, were not detected by many sites. Variation was most evident for the detection of low-abundance transcripts (e.g., BRCA2 c.8632+1G>A ?19,20 and BRCA1 c.135-1G>T ?5q and ?3). Detection of low-abundance transcripts was sometimes addressed by using more analytically sensitive detection methods (e.g., BRCA2 c.426-12_8delGTTTT ins18bp).CONCLUSIONS: We provide recommendations for best practice and raise key issues to consider when designing mRNA assays for evaluation of unclassified sequence variants.
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Associations of Mammographic Dense and Nondense Areas and Body Mass Index With Risk of Breast Cancer.
Am. J. Epidemiol.
PUBLISHED: 10-28-2013
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Mammographic density measurements are associated with risk of breast cancer. Few studies have investigated the concurrent associations of mammographic dense and nondense areas, body mass index (weight (kg)/height (m)(2)), and ages at mammogram and diagnosis with breast cancer risk. We conducted a matched, case-control study nested within the Melbourne Collaborative Cohort Study (cohort recruitment in 1990-1994 and follow-up until 2007) to estimate the associations between these factors and breast cancer risk under alternative causal models. Mammographic dense area was positively associated with risk, and the strength of this association was only slightly influenced by the choice of the causal model (relative risk per 1 standard deviation = 1.50, 95% confidence interval: 1.32, 1.70). Mammographic nondense area was inversely associated with risk under the assumption that fat in the body and fat in the breast cause breast cancer through independent mechanisms (relative risk per 1 standard deviation = 0.75, 95% confidence interval: 0.65, 0.86), whereas it was not associated with risk under the assumption that they are both proxies of adiposity. Knowledge about the biological mechanisms regulating the role played by mammographic nondense area and body fat on breast cancer risk is essential to better estimate their impacts on individual risk.
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Explaining variance in the cumulus mammographic measures that predict breast cancer risk: a twins and sisters study.
Cancer Epidemiol. Biomarkers Prev.
PUBLISHED: 10-15-2013
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Mammographic density, the area of the mammographic image that appears white or bright, predicts breast cancer risk. We estimated the proportions of variance explained by questionnaire-measured breast cancer risk factors and by unmeasured residual familial factors.
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Hi-Plex for high-throughput mutation screening: application to the breast cancer susceptibility gene PALB2.
BMC Med Genomics
PUBLISHED: 09-11-2013
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Massively parallel sequencing (MPS) has revolutionised biomedical research and offers enormous capacity for clinical application. We previously reported Hi-Plex, a streamlined highly-multiplexed PCR-MPS approach, allowing a given library to be sequenced with both the Ion Torrent and TruSeq chemistries. Comparable sequencing efficiency was achieved using material derived from lymphoblastoid cell lines and formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tumour.
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Identification of new genetic susceptibility Loci for breast cancer through consideration of gene-environment interactions.
Genet. Epidemiol.
PUBLISHED: 08-12-2013
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Genes that alter disease risk only in combination with certain environmental exposures may not be detected in genetic association analysis. By using methods accounting for gene-environment (G × E) interaction, we aimed to identify novel genetic loci associated with breast cancer risk. Up to 34,475 cases and 34,786 controls of European ancestry from up to 23 studies in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium were included. Overall, 71,527 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), enriched for association with breast cancer, were tested for interaction with 10 environmental risk factors using three recently proposed hybrid methods and a joint test of association and interaction. Analyses were adjusted for age, study, population stratification, and confounding factors as applicable. Three SNPs in two independent loci showed statistically significant association: SNPs rs10483028 and rs2242714 in perfect linkage disequilibrium on chromosome 21 and rs12197388 in ARID1B on chromosome 6. While rs12197388 was identified using the joint test with parity and with age at menarche (P-values = 3 × 10(-07) ), the variants on chromosome 21 q22.12, which showed interaction with adult body mass index (BMI) in 8,891 postmenopausal women, were identified by all methods applied. SNP rs10483028 was associated with breast cancer in women with a BMI below 25 kg/m(2) (OR = 1.26, 95% CI 1.15-1.38) but not in women with a BMI of 30 kg/m(2) or higher (OR = 0.89, 95% CI 0.72-1.11, P for interaction = 3.2 × 10(-05) ). Our findings confirm comparable power of the recent methods for detecting G × E interaction and the utility of using G × E interaction analyses to identify new susceptibility loci.
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Fine-Scale Mapping of the FGFR2 Breast Cancer Risk Locus: Putative Functional Variants Differentially Bind FOXA1 and E2F1.
Kerstin B Meyer, Martin O'Reilly, Kyriaki Michailidou, Saskia Carlebur, Stacey L Edwards, Juliet D French, Radhika Prathalingham, Joe Dennis, Manjeet K Bolla, Qin Wang, Ines de Santiago, John L Hopper, Helen Tsimiklis, Carmel Apicella, Melissa C Southey, Marjanka K Schmidt, Annegien Broeks, Laura J van 't Veer, Frans B Hogervorst, Kenneth Muir, Artitaya Lophatananon, Sarah Stewart-Brown, Pornthep Siriwanarangsan, Peter A Fasching, Michael P Lux, Arif B Ekici, Matthias W Beckmann, Julian Peto, Isabel Dos Santos Silva, Olivia Fletcher, Nichola Johnson, Elinor J Sawyer, Ian Tomlinson, Michael J Kerin, Nicola Miller, Federick Marme, Andreas Schneeweiss, Christof Sohn, Barbara Burwinkel, Pascal Guénel, Thérèse Truong, Pierre Laurent-Puig, Florence Menegaux, Stig E Bojesen, Børge G Nordestgaard, Sune F Nielsen, Henrik Flyger, Roger L Milne, M Pilar Zamora, Jose I Arias, Javier Benitez, Susan Neuhausen, Hoda Anton-Culver, Argyrios Ziogas, Christina C Dur, Hermann Brenner, Heiko Muller, Volker Arndt, Christa Stegmaier, Alfons Meindl, Rita K Schmutzler, Christoph Engel, Nina Ditsch, Hiltrud Brauch, Thomas Brüning, Yon-Dschun Ko, , Heli Nevanlinna, Taru A Muranen, Kristiina Aittomäki, Carl Blomqvist, Keitaro Matsuo, Hidemi Ito, Hiroji Iwata, Yasushi Yatabe, Thilo Dörk, Sonja Helbig, Natalia V Bogdanova, Annika Lindblom, Sara Margolin, Arto Mannermaa, Vesa Kataja, Veli-Matti Kosma, Jaana M Hartikainen, Georgia Chenevix-Trench, Anna H Wu, Chiu-Chen Tseng, David Van Den Berg, Daniel O Stram, Diether Lambrechts, Bernard Thienpont, Marie-Rose Christiaens, Ann Smeets, Jenny Chang-Claude, Anja Rudolph, Petra Seibold, Dieter Flesch-Janys, Paolo Radice, Paolo Peterlongo, Bernardo Bonanni, Loris Bernard, Fergus J Couch, Janet E Olson, Xianshu Wang, Kristen Purrington, Graham G Giles, Gianluca Severi, Laura Baglietto, Catriona McLean, Christopher A Haiman, Brian E Henderson, Fredrick Schumacher, Loic Le Marchand, Jacques Simard, Mark S Goldberg, France Labrèche, Martine Dumont, Soo-Hwang Teo, Cheng-Har Yip, Sze-Yee Phuah, Vessela Kristensen, Grethe Grenaker Alnæs, Anne-Lise Børresen-Dale, Wei Zheng, Sandra Deming-Halverson, Martha Shrubsole, Jirong Long, Robert Winqvist, Katri Pylkäs, Arja Jukkola-Vuorinen, Saila Kauppila, Irene L Andrulis, Julia A Knight, Gord Glendon, Sandrine Tchatchou, Peter Devilee, Robert A E M Tollenaar, Caroline M Seynaeve, Montserrat Garcia-Closas, Jonine Figueroa, Stephen J Chanock, Jolanta Lissowska, Kamila Czene, Hartef Darabi, Kimael Eriksson, Maartje J Hooning, John W M Martens, Ans M W van den Ouweland, Carolien H M van Deurzen, Per Hall, Jingmei Li, Jianjun Liu, Keith Humphreys, Xiao-Ou Shu, Wei Lu, Yu-Tang Gao, Hui Cai, Angela Cox, Malcolm W R Reed, William Blot, Lisa B Signorello, Qiuyin Cai, Paul D P Pharoah, Maya Ghoussaini, Patricia Harrington, Jonathan Tyrer, Daehee Kang, Ji-Yeob Choi, Sue K Park, Dong-Young Noh, Mikael Hartman, Miao Hui, Wei-Yen Lim, Shaik A Buhari, Ute Hamann, Asta Försti, Thomas Rüdiger, Hans-Ulrich Ulmer, Anna Jakubowska, Jan Lubiński, Katarzyna Jaworska, Katarzyna Durda, Suleeporn Sangrajrang, Valerie Gaborieau, Paul Brennan, James McKay, Celine Vachon, Susan Slager, Florentia Fostira, Robert Pilarski, Chen-Yang Shen, Chia-Ni Hsiung, Pei-Ei Wu, Ming-Feng Hou, Anthony Swerdlow, Alan Ashworth, Nick Orr, Minouk J Schoemaker, Bruce A J Ponder, Alison M Dunning, Douglas F Easton.
Am. J. Hum. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 08-01-2013
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The 10q26 locus in the second intron of FGFR2 is the locus most strongly associated with estrogen-receptor-positive breast cancer in genome-wide association studies. We conducted fine-scale mapping in case-control studies genotyped with a custom chip (iCOGS), comprising 41 studies (n = 89,050) of European ancestry, 9 Asian ancestry studies (n = 13,983), and 2 African ancestry studies (n = 2,028) from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium. We identified three statistically independent risk signals within the locus. Within risk signals 1 and 3, genetic analysis identified five and two variants, respectively, highly correlated with the most strongly associated SNPs. By using a combination of genetic fine mapping, data on DNase hypersensitivity, and electrophoretic mobility shift assays to study protein-DNA binding, we identified rs35054928, rs2981578, and rs45631563 as putative functional SNPs. Chromatin immunoprecipitation showed that FOXA1 preferentially bound to the risk-associated allele (C) of rs2981578 and was able to recruit ER? to this site in an allele-specific manner, whereas E2F1 preferentially bound the risk variant of rs35054928. The risk alleles were preferentially found in open chromatin and bound by Ser5 phosphorylated RNA polymerase II, suggesting that the risk alleles are associated with changes in transcription. Chromatin conformation capture demonstrated that the risk region was able to interact with the promoter of FGFR2, the likely target gene of this risk region. A role for FOXA1 in mediating breast cancer susceptibility at this locus is consistent with the finding that the FGFR2 risk locus primarily predisposes to estrogen-receptor-positive disease.
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Linkages between HIV-1 specificity for CCR5 or CXCR4 and in vitro usage of alternative coreceptors during progressive HIV-1 subtype C infection.
Retrovirology
PUBLISHED: 07-25-2013
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Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) subtype C (C-HIV) is spreading rapidly and is now responsible for >50% of HIV-1 infections worldwide, and >95% of infections in southern Africa and central Asia. These regions are burdened with the overwhelming majority of HIV-1 infections, yet we know very little about the pathogenesis of C-HIV. In addition to CCR5 and CXCR4, the HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins (Env) may engage a variety of alternative coreceptors for entry into transfected cells. Whilst alternative coreceptors do not appear to have a broad role in mediating the entry of HIV-1 into primary cells, characterizing patterns of alternative coreceptor usage in vitro can provide valuable insights into mechanisms of Env-coreceptor engagement that may be important for HIV-1 pathogenesis.
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Genome-wide association study of subtype-specific epithelial ovarian cancer risk alleles using pooled DNA.
Madalene A Earp, Linda E Kelemen, Anthony M Magliocco, Kenneth D Swenerton, Georgia Chenevix-Trench, , Yi Lu, Alexander Hein, Arif B Ekici, Matthias W Beckmann, Peter A Fasching, Diether Lambrechts, Evelyn Despierre, Ignace Vergote, Sandrina Lambrechts, Jennifer A Doherty, Mary Anne Rossing, Jenny Chang-Claude, Anja Rudolph, Grace Friel, Kirsten B Moysich, Kunle Odunsi, Lara Sucheston-Campbell, Galina Lurie, Marc T Goodman, Michael E Carney, Pamela J Thompson, Ingo B Runnebaum, Matthias Dürst, Peter Hillemanns, Thilo Dörk, Natalia Antonenkova, Natalia Bogdanova, Arto Leminen, Heli Nevanlinna, Liisa M Pelttari, Ralf Bützow, Clareann H Bunker, Francesmary Modugno, Robert P Edwards, Roberta B Ness, Andreas du Bois, Florian Heitz, Ira Schwaab, Philipp Harter, Beth Y Karlan, Christine Walsh, Jenny Lester, Allan Jensen, Susanne K Kjær, Claus K Høgdall, Estrid Høgdall, Lene Lundvall, Thomas A Sellers, Brooke L Fridley, Ellen L Goode, Julie M Cunningham, Robert A Vierkant, Graham G Giles, Laura Baglietto, Gianluca Severi, Melissa C Southey, Dong Liang, Xifeng Wu, Karen Lu, Michelle A T Hildebrandt, Douglas A Levine, Maria Bisogna, Joellen M Schildkraut, Edwin S Iversen, Rachel Palmieri Weber, Andrew Berchuck, Daniel W Cramer, Kathryn L Terry, Elizabeth M Poole, Shelley S Tworoger, Elisa V Bandera, Urmila Chandran, Irene Orlow, Sara H Olson, Elisabeth Wik, Helga B Salvesen, Line Bjorge, Mari K Halle, Anne M Van Altena, Katja K H Aben, Lambertus A Kiemeney, Leon F A G Massuger, Tanja Pejovic, Yukie T Bean, Cezary Cybulski, Jacek Gronwald, Jan Lubiński, Nicolas Wentzensen, Louise A Brinton, Jolanta Lissowska, Montserrat Garcia-Closas, Ed Dicks, Joe Dennis, Douglas F Easton, Honglin Song, Jonathan P Tyrer, Paul D P Pharoah, Diana Eccles, Ian G Campbell, Alice S Whittemore, Valerie McGuire, Weiva Sieh, Joseph H Rothstein, James M Flanagan, James Paul, Robert Brown, Catherine M Phelan, Harvey A Risch, John R McLaughlin, Steven A Narod, Argyrios Ziogas, Hoda Anton-Culver, Aleksandra Gentry-Maharaj, Usha Menon, Simon A Gayther, Susan J Ramus, Anna H Wu, Celeste L Pearce, Malcolm C Pike, Agnieszka Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Iwona K Rzepecka, Lukasz M Szafron, Jolanta Kupryjanczyk, Linda S Cook, Nhu D Le, Angela Brooks-Wilson.
Hum. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 07-17-2013
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Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is a heterogeneous cancer with both genetic and environmental risk factors. Variants influencing the risk of developing the less-common EOC subtypes have not been fully investigated. We performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of EOC according to subtype by pooling genomic DNA from 545 cases and 398 controls of European descent, and testing for allelic associations. We evaluated for replication 188 variants from the GWAS [56 variants for mucinous, 55 for endometrioid and clear cell, 53 for low-malignant potential (LMP) serous, and 24 for invasive serous EOC], selected using pre-defined criteria. Genotypes from 13,188 cases and 23,164 controls of European descent were used to perform unconditional logistic regression under the log-additive genetic model; odds ratios (OR) and 95 % confidence intervals are reported. Nine variants tagging six loci were associated with subtype-specific EOC risk at P < 0.05, and had an OR that agreed in direction of effect with the GWAS results. Several of these variants are in or near genes with a biological rationale for conferring EOC risk, including ZFP36L1 and RAD51B for mucinous EOC (rs17106154, OR = 1.17, P = 0.029, n = 1,483 cases), GRB10 for endometrioid and clear cell EOC (rs2190503, P = 0.014, n = 2,903 cases), and C22orf26/BPIL2 for LMP serous EOC (rs9609538, OR = 0.86, P = 0.0043, n = 892 cases). In analyses that included the 75 GWAS samples, the association between rs9609538 (OR = 0.84, P = 0.0007) and LMP serous EOC risk remained statistically significant at P < 0.0012 adjusted for multiple testing. Replication in additional samples will be important to verify these results for the less-common EOC subtypes.
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Evaluation of a 5-tier scheme proposed for classification of sequence variants using bioinformatic and splicing assay data: inter-reviewer variability and promotion of minimum reporting guidelines.
Hum. Mutat.
PUBLISHED: 07-12-2013
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Splicing assays are commonly undertaken in the clinical setting to assess the clinical relevance of sequence variants in disease predisposition genes. A 5-tier classification system incorporating both bioinformatic and splicing assay information was previously proposed as a method to provide consistent clinical classification of such variants. Members of the ENIGMA Consortium Splicing Working Group undertook a study to assess the applicability of the scheme to published assay results, and the consistency of classifications across multiple reviewers. Splicing assay data were identified for 235 BRCA1 and 176 BRCA2 unique variants, from 77 publications. At least six independent reviewers from research and/or clinical settings comprehensively examined splicing assay methods and data reported for 22 variant assays of 21 variants in four publications, and classified the variants using the 5-tier classification scheme. Inconsistencies in variant classification occurred between reviewers for 17 of the variant assays. These could be attributed to a combination of ambiguity in presentation of the classification criteria, differences in interpretation of the data provided, nonstandardized reporting of results, and the lack of quantitative data for the aberrant transcripts. We propose suggestions for minimum reporting guidelines for splicing assays, and improvements to the 5-tier splicing classification system to allow future evaluation of its performance as a clinical tool.
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Diagnostic chest X-rays and breast cancer risk before age 50 years for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers.
Cancer Epidemiol. Biomarkers Prev.
PUBLISHED: 07-12-2013
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The effects of low-dose medical radiation on breast cancer risk are uncertain, and few studies have included genetically susceptible women, such as those who carry germline BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations.
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Human innate immunity to Toxoplasma gondii is mediated by host caspase-1 and ASC and parasite GRA15.
MBio
PUBLISHED: 07-11-2013
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Interleukin-1? (IL-1?) functions as a key regulator of inflammation and innate immunity. The protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii actively infects human blood monocytes and induces the production of IL-1?; however, the host and parasite factors that mediate IL-1? production during T. gondii infection are poorly understood. We report that T. gondii induces IL-1? transcript, processing/cleavage, and release from infected primary human monocytes and THP-1 cells. Treating monocytes with the caspase-1 inhibitor Ac-YVAD-CMK reduced IL-1? release, suggesting a role for the inflammasome in T. gondii-induced IL-1? production. This was confirmed by performing short hairpin RNA (shRNA) knockdown of caspase-1 and of the inflammasome adaptor protein ASC. IL-1? induction required active parasite invasion of monocytes, since heat-killed or mycalolide B-treated parasites did not induce IL-1?. Among the type I, II, and III strains of T. gondii, the type II strain induced substantially more IL-1? mRNA and protein release than did the type I and III strains. Since IL-1? transcript is known to be induced downstream of NF-?B signaling, we investigated a role for the GRA15 protein, which induces sustained NF-?B signaling in a parasite strain-specific manner. By infecting human monocytes with a GRA15-knockout type II strain and a type I strain stably expressing type II GRA15, we determined that GRA15 is responsible for IL-1? induction during T. gondii infection of human monocytes. This research defines a pathway driving human innate immunity by describing a role for the classical inflammasome components caspase-1 and ASC and the parasite GRA15 protein in T. gondii-induced IL-1? production.
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Cross-platform compatibility of Hi-Plex, a streamlined approach for targeted massively parallel sequencing.
Anal. Biochem.
PUBLISHED: 07-08-2013
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Although per-base sequencing costs have decreased during recent years, library preparation for targeted massively parallel sequencing remains constrained by high reagent cost, limited design flexibility, and protocol complexity. To address these limitations, we previously developed Hi-Plex, a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) massively parallel sequencing strategy for screening panels of genomic target regions. Here, we demonstrate that Hi-Plex applied with hybrid adapters can generate a library suitable for sequencing with both the Ion Torrent and the TruSeq chemistries and that adjusting primer concentrations improves coverage uniformity. These results expand Hi-Plex capabilities as an accurate, affordable, flexible, and rapid approach for various genetic screening applications.
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Real-time imaging of Toxoplasma-infected human monocytes under fluidic shear stress reveals rapid translocation of intracellular parasites across endothelial barriers.
Cell. Microbiol.
PUBLISHED: 05-25-2013
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Peripheral blood monocytes are actively infected by Toxoplasma gondii and can function as Trojan horses for parasite spread in the bloodstream. Using dynamic live-cell imaging, we visualized the transendothelial migration (TEM) of T.?gondii-infected primary human monocytes during the initial minutes following contact with human endothelium. On average, infected and uninfected monocytes required only 9.8 and 4.1?min, respectively, to complete TEM. Infection increased monocyte crawling distances and velocities on endothelium, but overall TEM frequencies were comparable between infected and uninfected cells. In the vasculature, monocytes adhere to endothelium under the conditions of shear stress found in rapidly flowing blood. Remarkably, the addition of fluidic shear stress increased the TEM frequency of infected monocytes 4.5-fold compared to static conditions (to 45.2% from 10.3%). Infection led to a modest increase in expression of the high-affinityconformation of the monocyte integrin Mac-1 (CD11b/CD18), and Mac-1 accumulated near endothelial junctions during TEM. Blocking Mac-1 inhibited the crawling and TEM of infected monocytes to a greater degree than uninfected monocytes, and blocking the Mac-1 ligand, ICAM-1, dramatically reduced crawling and TEM for both populations. These findings contribute to a greater understanding of parasite dissemination from the vasculature into tissues.
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A common mechanism of clinical HIV-1 resistance to the CCR5 antagonist maraviroc despite divergent resistance levels and lack of common gp120 resistance mutations.
Retrovirology
PUBLISHED: 04-17-2013
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The CCR5 antagonist maraviroc (MVC) inhibits human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) entry by altering the CCR5 extracellular loops (ECL), such that the gp120 envelope glycoproteins (Env) no longer recognize CCR5. The mechanisms of HIV-1 resistance to MVC, the only CCR5 antagonist licensed for clinical use are poorly understood, with insights into MVC resistance almost exclusively limited to knowledge obtained from in vitro studies or from studies of resistance to other CCR5 antagonists. To more precisely understand mechanisms of resistance to MVC in vivo, we characterized Envs isolated from 2 subjects who experienced virologic failure on MVC.
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A high-plex PCR approach for massively parallel sequencing.
BioTechniques
PUBLISHED: 04-09-2013
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Current methods for targeted massively parallel sequencing (MPS) have several drawbacks, including limited design flexibility, expense, and protocol complexity, which restrict their application to settings involving modest target size and requiring low cost and high throughput. To address this, we have developed Hi-Plex, a PCR-MPS strategy intended for high-throughput screening of multiple genomic target regions that integrates simple, automated primer design software to control product size. Featuring permissive thermocycling conditions and clamp bias reduction, our protocol is simple, cost- and time-effective, uses readily available reagents, does not require expensive instrumentation, and requires minimal optimization. In a 60-plex assay targeting the breast cancer predisposition genes PALB2 and XRCC2, we applied Hi-Plex to 100 ng LCL-derived DNA, and 100 ng and 25 ng FFPE tumor-derived DNA. Altogether, at least 86.94% of the human genome-mapped reads were on target, and 100% of targeted amplicons were represented within 25-fold of the mean. Using 25 ng FFPE-derived DNA, 95.14% of mapped reads were on-target and relative representation ranged from 10.1-fold lower to 5.8-fold higher than the mean. These results were obtained using only the initial automatically-designed primers present in equal concentration. Hi-Plex represents a powerful new approach for screening panels of genomic target regions.
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Toxoplasma gondii modulates the dynamics of human monocyte adhesion to vascular endothelium under fluidic shear stress.
J. Leukoc. Biol.
PUBLISHED: 03-13-2013
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Toxoplasma gondii actively infects circulating immune cells, including monocytes and DCs, and is thought to use these cells as Trojan horses for parasite dissemination. To investigate the interactions of T. gondii-infected human monocytes with vascular endothelium under conditions of shear stress, we developed a fluidic and time-lapse fluorescence microscopy system. Both uninfected and infected monocytes rolled, decelerated, and firmly adhered on TNF-?-activated endothelium. Interestingly, T. gondii-infected primary human monocytes and THP-1 cells exhibited altered adhesion dynamics compared with uninfected monocytes: infected cells rolled at significantly higher velocities (2.5- to 4.6-fold) and over greater distances (2.6- to 4.8-fold) than uninfected monocytes, before firmly adhering. During monocyte searching, 29-36% of infected monocytes compared with 0-11% of uninfected monocytes migrated >10 ?m from the point where they initiated searching, and these "wandering" searches were predominantly in the direction of flow. As infected monocytes appeared delayed in their transition to firm adhesion, we examined the effects of infection on integrin expression and function. T. gondii did not affect the expression of LFA-1, VLA-4, or MAC-1 or the ability of Mn(2+) to activate these integrins. However, T. gondii infection impaired LFA-1 and VLA-4 clustering and pseudopod extension in response to integrin ligands. Surprisingly, a single intracellular parasite was sufficient to mediate these effects. This research has established a system for studying pathogen modulation of human leukocyte adhesion under conditions of physiological shear stress and has revealed a previously unappreciated effect of T. gondii infection on ligand-dependent integrin clustering.
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Using SNP genotypes to improve the discrimination of a simple breast cancer risk prediction model.
Breast Cancer Res. Treat.
PUBLISHED: 02-28-2013
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It has been shown that, for women aged 50 years or older, the discriminatory accuracy of the Breast Cancer Risk Prediction Tool (BCRAT) can be modestly improved by the inclusion of information on common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that are associated with increased breast cancer risk. We aimed to determine whether a similar improvement is seen for earlier onset disease. We used the Australian Breast Cancer Family Registry to study a population-based sample of 962 cases aged 35-59 years, and 463 controls frequency matched for age and for whom genotyping data was available. Overall, the inclusion of data on seven SNPs improved the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) from 0.58 (95 % confidence interval [CI] 0.55-0.61) for BCRAT alone to 0.61 (95 % CI 0.58-0.64) for BCRAT and SNP data combined (p < 0.001). For women aged 35-39 years at interview, the corresponding improvement in AUC was from 0.61 (95 % CI 0.56-0.66) to 0.65 (95 % CI 0.60-0.70; p = 0.03), while for women aged 40-49 years at diagnosis, the AUC improved from 0.61 (95 % CI 0.55-0.66) to 0.63 (95 % CI 0.57-0.69; p = 0.04). Using previously used classifications of low, intermediate and high risk, 2.1 % of cases and none of the controls aged 35-39 years, and 10.9 % of cases and 4.0 % of controls aged 40-49 years were classified into a higher risk group. Including information on seven SNPs associated with breast cancer risk, improves the discriminatory accuracy of BCRAT for women aged 35-39 years and 40-49 years. Given, the low absolute risk for women in these age groups, only a small proportion are reclassified into a higher category for predicted 5-year risk of breast cancer.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

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In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.