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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Emergency department variation in utilization and diagnostic yield of advanced radiography in diagnosis of pulmonary embolus.
J Emerg Med
PUBLISHED: 03-11-2014
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There is growing pressure to measure and reduce unnecessary imaging in the emergency department.
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Rapid (13)C Urea Breath Test to Identify Helicobacter pylori Infection in Emergency Department Patients with Upper Abdominal Pain.
West J Emerg Med
PUBLISHED: 05-21-2013
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Introduction: In emergency department (ED) patients with upper abdominal pain, management includes ruling out serious diseases and providing symptomatic relief. One of the major causes of upper abdominal pain is an ulcer caused by Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori), which can be treated and cured with antibiotics. We sought to estimate the prevalence of H. pylori infection in symptomatic patients using a convenience sample at a single urban academic ED and demonstrate the feasibility of ED-based testing. Methods: We prospectively enrolled patients with a chief complaint of pain or discomfort in the upper abdomen for 1 year from February 2011 until February 2012 at a single academic urban ED. Enrolled subjects were tested for H. pylori using a rapid point of care (13)C Urea Breath Test (UBT) [Exalenz Bioscience]. We compared patient characteristics between those who tested positive versus negative for the disease. Results: A total of 205 patients with upper abdominal pain were tested over 12 months, and 24% (95% confidence interval: 19% to 30%) tested positive for H. pylori. Black subjects were more likely to test positive than white subjects (28% v. 6%, P < 0.001). Other factors, such as age and sex, were not different between the 2 groups. Conclusion: In our ED, H. pylori infection was present in 1 in 4 patients with epigastric pain, and testing with a UBT was feasible. Further study is needed to determine the risk factors associated with infection, the prevalence of H. pylori in other EDs, the effect of the test on ED length of stay and the costeffectiveness of an ED-based test-and-treat strategy.
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Tissue specific responses of oysters, Crassostrea virginica, to silver nanoparticles.
Aquat. Toxicol.
PUBLISHED: 03-24-2013
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Silver nanoparticle (AgNP) toxicity in eastern oysters, Crassostrea virginica, was investigated in both gill and hepatopancreas tissues, and compared to dissolved Ag exposures. Oysters were exposed to varying concentrations of AgNPs prepared with citrate coatings and dissolved Ag (AgNO?) for 48 h and the effects on a suite of biomarkers of cellular stress were evaluated. Two biomarkers of cellular damage were evaluated-lysosomal destabilization rates of hepatopancreas cells as indicators of lysosomal damage, and lipid peroxidation as an indicator of oxidative damage. Total glutathione (GSH), catalase (CAT), and superoxide dismutase (SOD) assays were used as indicators of impacts on antioxidant capacity. The results indicated that gill tissues were more prone to oxidative damage following dissolved Ag exposures than AgNP exposures, while hepatopancreas tissues were more sensitive to AgNP exposures. Total protein levels increased in hepatopancreas tissues following AgNP exposures, but not dissolved Ag exposures. These tissue specific differences in toxicity and bioreactivity of Ag nanoparticles compared to dissolved metal ions reflect distinct nanoparticle effects. Oysters exposed to dissolved Ag would be more prone to cellular and tissue damage of gills, but oysters exposed to AgNPs could be more prone to hepatopancreas damage contributing to metabolic and reproductive impairment.
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The validity of self-reported primary adherence among Medicaid patients discharged from the emergency department with a prescription medication.
Ann Emerg Med
PUBLISHED: 01-10-2013
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We determine the validity of self-reported prescription filling among emergency department (ED) patients.
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Comparison of methods for measuring crowding and its effects on length of stay in the emergency department.
Acad Emerg Med
PUBLISHED: 12-16-2011
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This consensus conference presentation article focuses on methods of measuring crowding. The authors compare daily versus hourly measures, static versus dynamic measures, and the use of linear or logistic regression models versus survival analysis models to estimate the effect of crowding on an outcome.
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Executive summary: interventions to improve quality in the crowded emergency department.
Acad Emerg Med
PUBLISHED: 12-16-2011
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Emergency department (ED) crowding is a major public health problem in the United States, with increasing numbers of ED visits, longer lengths of stay in the ED, and the common practice of ED boarding. In the next several years, several measures of ED crowding will be assessed and reported on government websites. In addition, with the implementation of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), millions more Americans will have health care insurance, many of whom will choose the ED for their care. In June 2011, a consensus conference was conducted in Boston, Massachusetts, by the journal Academic Emergency Medicine entitled "Interventions to Assure Quality in the Crowded Emergency Department." The overall goal of the conference was to develop a series of research agendas to identify promising interventions to safeguard the quality of emergency care during crowded periods and to reduce ED crowding altogether through systemwide solutions. This was achieved through three objectives: 1) a review of interventions that have been implemented to reduce crowding and summarize the evidence of their effectiveness on the delivery of emergency care; 2) to identify strategies within or outside of the health care setting (i.e., policy, engineering, operations management, system design) that may help reduce crowding or improve the quality of emergency care provided during episodes of ED crowding; and 3) to identify the most appropriate design and analytic techniques for rigorously evaluating ED interventions designed to reduce crowding or improve the quality of emergency care provided during episodes of ED crowding. This article describes the background and rationale for the conference and highlights some of the discussions that occurred on the day of the conference. A series of manuscripts on the details of the conference is presented in this issue of Academic Emergency Medicine.
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Comparing National Institutes of Health funding of emergency medicine to four medical specialties.
Acad Emerg Med
PUBLISHED: 08-19-2011
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The purpose of this study was to compare National Institutes of Health (NIH) funding received in 2008 by emergency medicine (EM) to the specialties of internal medicine, pediatrics, anesthesiology, and family medicine. The hypothesis was that EM would receive fewer NIH awards and less funding dollars per active physician and per medical school faculty member compared to the other four specialties.
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A randomized controlled trial of the effect of service delivery information on patient satisfaction in an emergency department fast track.
Acad Emerg Med
PUBLISHED: 07-19-2011
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The objective was to determine the effect on patient satisfaction of providing patients with predicted service completion times.
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Measures of crowding in the emergency department: a systematic review.
Acad Emerg Med
PUBLISHED: 05-17-2011
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Despite consensus regarding the conceptual foundation of crowding, and increasing research on factors and outcomes associated with crowding, there is no criterion standard measure of crowding. The objective was to conduct a systematic review of crowding measures and compare them in conceptual foundation and validity.
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Telehealth or Tele-education? Providing intensive, ongoing therapy to remote communities.
Stud Health Technol Inform
PUBLISHED: 12-31-2010
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The Royal Institute for Deaf and Blind Children (RIDBC) in Sydney, Australia has demonstrated an ongoing commitment to innovation in the field of hearing impairment. RIDBC has created a unique program known as RIDBC Teleschool which successfully utilises videoconferencing technology to provide specialist hearing support and associated therapies to children living in rural and remote areas of Australia, including children in Indigenous communities. The high rate of hearing loss in Indigenous communities has led to the implementation of hearing screening programs in many areas of Australia. However, access to therapy support after screening is a critical intervention component which is often lacking in screening programs. RIDBC Teleschool uses a telehealth model to address this unmet need.
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New legal protections for reporting patient errors under the Patient Safety and Quality Improvement Act: a review of the medical literature and analysis.
J Patient Saf
PUBLISHED: 09-29-2010
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The Patient Safety and Quality Improvement Act (PSQIA) of 2005, inspired by the Institute of Medicines (IOM) 1999 report To Err Is Human, affords federal protections in exchange for error disclosures. However, the PSQIA is unlikely to be effective unless frontline providers are aware of its existence. In this study, we assessed the quantity of publications regarding this protection within the medical literature.
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Teleintervention for infants and young children who are deaf or hard-of-hearing.
Pediatrics
PUBLISHED: 08-04-2010
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Advancements in videoconferencing equipment and Internet-based tools for sharing information have resulted in widespread use of telemedicine for providing health care to people who live in remote areas. Given the limited supply of people trained to provide early-intervention services to infants and young children who are deaf or hard-of-hearing, and the fact that many families who need such services live significant distances from each other and from metropolitan areas, such "teleintervention" strategies hold promise for providing early-intervention services to children who are deaf or hard-of-hearing. Unfortunately, little is known about the cost-effectiveness of such teleintervention services. In this article we outline the rationale for using teleintervention services for children who are deaf or hard-of-hearing, describe a teleintervention program that has been serving relatively large numbers of children in Australia since 2002, and summarize what we know about the cost-effectiveness of such an approach. We conclude by summarizing the type of research needed to decide whether teleintervention should be used more frequently with children who are deaf or hard-of-hearing and the potential relevance of the teleintervention approach for the development of intervention systems in the United States.
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Successful sonographic visualisation of the abdominal aorta differs significantly among a diverse group of credentialed emergency department providers.
Emerg Med J
PUBLISHED: 08-02-2010
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The aims of this study were to examine the association between emergency department (ED) providers experience with bedside ultrasound after achieving credentialing for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) sonography, and their successful visualisation rate of the abdominal aorta among consecutive patients who presented asymptomatically but with risk factors for AAA.
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Characterizing waiting room time, treatment time, and boarding time in the emergency department using quantile regression.
Acad Emerg Med
PUBLISHED: 07-31-2010
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The objective was to characterize service completion times by patient, clinical, temporal, and crowding factors for different phases of emergency care using quantile regression (QR).
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Staphylococcus aureus TargetArray: comprehensive differential essential gene expression as a mechanistic tool to profile antibacterials.
Antimicrob. Agents Chemother.
PUBLISHED: 06-14-2010
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The widespread emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria and a lack of new pharmaceutical development have catalyzed a need for new and innovative approaches for antibiotic drug discovery. One bottleneck in antibiotic discovery is the lack of a rapid and comprehensive method to identify compound mode of action (MOA). Since a hallmark of antibiotic action is as an inhibitor of essential cellular targets and processes, we identify a set of 308 essential genes in the clinically important pathogen Staphylococcus aureus. A total of 446 strains differentially expressing these genes were constructed in a comprehensive platform of sensitized and resistant strains. A subset of strains allows either target underexpression or target overexpression by heterologous promoter replacements with a suite of tetracycline-regulatable promoters. A further subset of 236 antisense RNA-expressing clones allows knockdown expression of cognate targets. Knockdown expression confers selective antibiotic hypersensitivity, while target overexpression confers resistance. The antisense strains were configured into a TargetArray in which pools of sensitized strains were challenged in fitness tests. A rapid detection method measures strain responses toward antibiotics. The TargetArray antibiotic fitness test results show mechanistically informative biological fingerprints that allow MOA elucidation.
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An epidemiologic study of closed emergency department malpractice claims in a national database of physician malpractice insurers.
Acad Emerg Med
PUBLISHED: 06-12-2010
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The objective was to perform an epidemiologic study of emergency department (ED) medical malpractice claims using data maintained by the Physician Insurers Association of America (PIAA), a trade association whose participating malpractice insurance carriers collectively insure over 60% of practicing physicians in the United States.
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The effect of triage diagnostic standing orders on emergency department treatment time.
Ann Emerg Med
PUBLISHED: 04-05-2010
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Triage standing orders are used in emergency departments (EDs) to initiate evaluation when there is no bed available. This study evaluates the effect of diagnostic triage standing orders on ED treatment time of adult patients who presented with a chief complaint for which triage standing orders had been developed.
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Mutant of Moloney murine leukemia virus reverse transcriptase exhibits higher resistance to common RT-qPCR inhibitors.
Anal. Biochem.
PUBLISHED: 01-05-2010
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Inhibitor resistance of several commercial Moloney murine leukemia virus reverse transcriptase (MMLV RT) enzymes was investigated. IC(50) values were determined for potential RNA contaminants, including guanidine thiocyanate, ethanol, formamide, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), and plant-related acidic polysaccharides. Sensitivity (as judged by MMLV RT IC(50) values) was directly correlated to the outcome of "mock" reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) assays carried out with exogenous inhibitors. MMLV RT enzymes lacking RNase H activity were shown to be more sensitive to RT-qPCR inhibitors. In contrast, a thermal-resistant MMLV RT pentuple mutant (E69K/E302R/W313F/L435G/N454K) showed higher tolerance to these substances than the wild type. Increased resistance was also noted in RT-qPCR comparisons employing crude cell lysates.
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Routine screening for asymptomatic abdominal aortic aneurysm in high-risk patients is not recommended in emergency departments that are frequently crowded.
Acad Emerg Med
PUBLISHED: 12-07-2009
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The objectives were to examine the feasibility of offering abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) screening to consecutive, asymptomatic high-risk patients in a busy emergency department (ED) and to compare the prevalence of undetected AAA among ED patients to the prevalence among similarly aged men from the general population.
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National study of patient, visit, and hospital characteristics associated with leaving an emergency department without being seen: predicting LWBS.
Acad Emerg Med
PUBLISHED: 10-06-2009
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The objective was to estimate the national left-without-being-seen (LWBS) rate and to identify patient, visit, and institutional characteristics that predict LWBS.
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Effectiveness of mandatory alcohol testing programs in reducing alcohol involvement in fatal motor carrier crashes.
Am. J. Epidemiol.
PUBLISHED: 08-19-2009
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Mandatory alcohol testing programs for motor carrier drivers were implemented in the United States in 1995 and have not been adequately evaluated. Using data from the Fatality Analysis Reporting System during 1982-2006, the authors assessed the effectiveness of mandatory alcohol testing programs in reducing alcohol involvement in fatal motor carrier crashes. The study sample consisted of 69,295 motor carrier drivers and 83,436 non-motor-carrier drivers who were involved in 66,138 fatal multivehicle crashes. Overall, 2.7% of the motor carrier drivers and 19.4% of the non-motor-carrier drivers had positive blood alcohol concentrations. During the study period, the prevalence of alcohol involvement in fatal crashes decreased by 80% among motor carrier drivers and 41% among non-motor-carrier drivers. With adjustment for driver age, sex, history of driving while intoxicated, and survival status, implementation of the mandatory alcohol testing programs was found to be associated with a 23% reduced risk of alcohol involvement in fatal crashes by motor carrier drivers (odds ratio = 0.77, 95% confidence interval: 0.62, 0.94). Results from this study indicate that mandatory alcohol testing programs may have contributed to a significant reduction in alcohol involvement in fatal motor carrier crashes.
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The effects of silver nanoparticles on oyster embryos.
Mar. Environ. Res.
PUBLISHED: 07-14-2009
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Nanoparticles may be introduced into aquatic environments during production processes and also as a result of release following their use in various commercial formulations and biologic applications. Filter-feeding bivalve mollusks such as oysters are valuable model species for characterizing nanoparticle bioavailability and interactions with basic cellular processes. The adults release their gametes into the environment, so their embryos and larvae are also likely targets of nanoparticles. The purpose of these studies was to characterize the toxicity of metal nanoparticles on embryonic development of oysters, Crassostrea virginica and to compare the relative sensitivity of embryos to adults. Newly-fertilized oyster embryos were exposed to silver nanoparticles (AgNP) and then the percent normal development after 48h was assessed. Studies were conducted with adult oysters in which they were also exposed to AgNP for 48h, and the effects on lysosomal destabilization were determined. The expression of metallothionein (MT) gene expression was also assessed in both embryos and adults. Adverse effects on embryonic development were observed at concentrations similar to those that caused both statistically and biologically significant effects on lysosomal destabilization of adults. Significant increases in MT mRNA levels were observed in both embryos and adult oysters, and MT levels were highly induced in embryos. While we do not know whether the toxicity and gene expression responses observed in this study were due to the nanoparticles themselves or the Ag ions that dissociated from the nanoparticles, these kinds of basic studies are essential for addressing the potential impacts of nanoengineered particles on fundamental cellular processes as well as aquatic organisms.
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Changes needed in the care for sheltered persons: a multistate analysis from Hurricane Katrina.
Am J Disaster Med
PUBLISHED: 06-16-2009
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Following Hurricane Katrina, nearly 1,400 evacuation shelters were opened in 27 states across the nation to accommodate the more than 450,000 evacuees from the gulf region. The levee breaks in New Orleans and storm surge in Mississippi brought about significant morbidity and mortality, ultimately killing more than 1,300 people. The purpose of this study was to summarize the health needs of approximately 30,000 displaced persons who resided in shelters in eight states, including prescription medication needs, dispersement of durable medical equipment, and referrals for further care.
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Review of hospital preparedness instruments for National Incident Management System compliance.
Disaster Med Public Health Prep
PUBLISHED: 06-04-2009
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No standard exists by which to evaluate a hospitals compliance for the National Incident Management System (NIMS). The instruments available and in use today for the evaluation of hospital preparedness have variable adherence to the principles and elements set forth in NIMS. This is especially evident in the areas of command and management and communications and information management. The use of NIMS as a standard remains itself in question because of its lack of focus on the health care environment and incomplete list of pertinent elements.
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Major influences on hospital emergency management and disaster preparedness.
Disaster Med Public Health Prep
PUBLISHED: 06-04-2009
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The role of hospitals in the community response to disasters has received increased attention, particularly since the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001. Hospitals must be prepared to respond to and recover from all-hazards emergencies and disasters. There have been several initiatives to guide hospitals role in these events and to assist hospitals in their effort to prepare for them. This article focuses on the efforts of 4 distinct groups: The Joint Commission (TJC), the executive branch of the US government, the US Congress, and the Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS). Despite the different approach each group uses to assist hospitals to improve their emergency management capabilities, the initiatives reinforce one another and have resulted in increased efforts by hospitals to improve their disaster preparedness and response capabilities and community integration. The continued progress of our medical response system in all-hazard emergencies and disasters depends in large part on the future guidance and support of these 4 key institutions.
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Consensus and tools needed to measure health care emergency management capabilities.
Disaster Med Public Health Prep
PUBLISHED: 06-04-2009
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There is no widely accepted, validated framework of health care emergency management capabilities (HEMCs) that can be used by facilities to guide their disaster preparedness and response efforts. We reviewed the HEMCs and the evaluation methods used by the Veterans Health Administration, The Joint Commission, the Institute of Medicine Metropolitan Medical Response System committee, the Department of Homeland Security, and the Department of Health and Human Services to determine whether a core set of HEMCs and evaluative methods could be identified.Despite differences in the conceptualization of health care emergency management, there is considerable overlap among the agencies regarding major capabilities and capability-specific elements. Of the 5 agencies, 4 identified occupant safety and continuity of operations as major capabilities. An additional 5 capabilities were identified as major by 3 agencies. Most often the differences were related to whether a capability should be a major one versus a capability-specific element (eg, decontamination, management of resources). All of the agencies rely on multiple indicators and data sources to evaluate HEMCs. Few performance-based tools have been developed and none have been fully tested for their reliability and validity. Consensus on a framework and tools to measure HEMCs is needed.
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Creation of surge capacity by early discharge of hospitalized patients at low risk for untoward events.
Disaster Med Public Health Prep
PUBLISHED: 04-08-2009
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US hospitals are expected to function without external aid for up to 96 hours during a disaster; however, concern exists that there is insufficient capacity in hospitals to absorb large numbers of acute casualties. The aim of the study was to determine the potential for creation of inpatient bed surge capacity from the early discharge (reverse triage) of hospital inpatients at low risk of untoward events for up to 96 hours.
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The effect of emergency department crowding on clinically oriented outcomes.
Acad Emerg Med
PUBLISHED: 04-02-2009
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An Institute of Medicine (IOM) report defines six domains of quality of care: safety, patient-centeredness, timeliness, efficiency, effectiveness, and equity. The effect of emergency department (ED) crowding on these domains of quality has not been comprehensively evaluated.
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Validity of police-reported alcohol involvement in fatal motor carrier crashes in the United States between 1982 and 2005.
J Safety Res
PUBLISHED: 03-26-2009
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To examine the validity of police-reported alcohol data for drivers involved in fatal motor carrier crashes.
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Forecasting models of emergency department crowding.
Acad Emerg Med
PUBLISHED: 02-04-2009
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The authors investigated whether models using time series methods can generate accurate short-term forecasts of emergency department (ED) bed occupancy, using traditional historical averages models as comparison.
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Crowding delays treatment and lengthens emergency department length of stay, even among high-acuity patients.
Ann Emerg Med
PUBLISHED: 01-14-2009
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We determine the effect of crowding on emergency department (ED) waiting room, treatment, and boarding times across multiple sites and acuity groups.
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Family burden after traumatic brain injury in children.
Pediatrics
PUBLISHED: 01-02-2009
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Traumatic brain injury has a substantial impact on caregivers. This study describes the burden experienced by caregivers of children with traumatic brain injury and examines the relationship between child functioning and family burden during the first year after injury.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.