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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Hypoglossal-facial nerve 'side'-to-side neurorrhaphy using a predegenerated nerve autograft for facial palsy after removal of acoustic tumours at the cerebellopontine angle.
J. Neurol. Neurosurg. Psychiatr.
PUBLISHED: 09-18-2014
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Hypoglossal-facial nerve (HN-FN) neurorrhaphy is a method commonly used to treat facial palsy when the proximal stump of the injured FN is unavailable. Since the classic HN-FN neurorrhaphy method that needs to section the injured FN is not suitable for incomplete facial palsy, we investigated a modified method that consists of HN-FN 'side'-to-side neurorrhaphy, retaining the remaining or spontaneously regenerated FN axons while preserving hemihypoglossal function.
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Helicobacter pylori targets cancer-associated apical-junctional constituents in gastroids and gastric epithelial cells.
Gut
PUBLISHED: 08-14-2014
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Helicobacter pylori strains that express the oncoprotein CagA augment risk for gastric cancer. However, the precise mechanisms through which cag(+) strains heighten cancer risk have not been fully delineated and model systems that recapitulate the gastric niche are critical for understanding pathogenesis. Gastroids are three-dimensional organ-like structures that provide unique opportunities to study host-H. pylori interactions in a preclinical model. We used gastroids to inform and direct in vitro studies to define mechanisms through which H. pylori modulates expression of the cancer-associated tight junction protein claudin-7.
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Motility and chemotaxis mediate the preferential colonization of gastric injury sites by Helicobacter pylori.
PLoS Pathog.
PUBLISHED: 07-01-2014
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Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a pathogen contributing to peptic inflammation, ulceration, and cancer. A crucial step in the pathogenic sequence is when the bacterium first interacts with gastric tissue, an event that is poorly understood in vivo. We have shown that the luminal space adjacent to gastric epithelial damage is a microenvironment, and we hypothesized that this microenvironment might enhance H. pylori colonization. Inoculation with 106 H. pylori (wild-type Sydney Strain 1, SS1) significantly delayed healing of acetic-acid induced ulcers at Day 1, 7 and 30 post-inoculation, and wild-type SS1 preferentially colonized the ulcerated area compared to uninjured gastric tissue in the same animal at all time points. Gastric resident Lactobacillus spp. did not preferentially colonize ulcerated tissue. To determine whether bacterial motility and chemotaxis are important to ulcer healing and colonization, we analyzed isogenic H. pylori mutants defective in motility (?motB) or chemotaxis (?cheY). ?motB (10(6)) failed to colonize ulcerated or healthy stomach tissue. ?cheY (10(6)) colonized both tissues, but without preferential colonization of ulcerated tissue. However, ?cheY did modestly delay ulcer healing, suggesting that chemotaxis is not required for this process. We used two-photon microscopy to induce microscopic epithelial lesions in vivo, and evaluated accumulation of fluorescently labeled H. pylori at gastric damage sites in the time frame of minutes instead of days. By 5 min after inducing damage, H. pylori SS1 preferentially accumulated at the site of damage and inhibited gastric epithelial restitution. H. pylori ?cheY modestly accumulated at the gastric surface and inhibited restitution, but did not preferentially accumulate at the injury site. H. pylori ?motB neither accumulated at the surface nor inhibited restitution. We conclude that bacterial chemosensing and motility rapidly promote H. pylori colonization of injury sites, and thereby biases the injured tissue towards sustained gastric damage.
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Efficacy of the selective progesterone receptor agonist Nestorone for chronic experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.
J. Neuroimmunol.
PUBLISHED: 06-06-2014
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Progesterone plays a protective role in the experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) model of multiple sclerosis (MS). Besides spinal cord neuropathology, MS patients present a dysfunctional hippocampus. In this work we studied the therapeutic effects of the progestin Nestorone in the brain of mice with chronic EAE. Nestorone decreased clinical grade and enhanced motor behavior. In addition, it increased cell proliferation and doublecortin positive neuroblasts in the hippocampus, increased GABAergic interneurons and attenuated the number of Iba1+ microglia/macrophages, events possibly linked to enhancement of neurogenesis. Therefore, Nestorone protected against hippocampus abnormalities and improved functional outcomes of EAE mice, suggesting its potential value for MS.
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Multi-label classification of chronically ill patients with bag of words and supervised dimensionality reduction algorithms.
J Biomed Inform
PUBLISHED: 05-16-2014
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This research is motivated by the issue of classifying illnesses of chronically ill patients for decision support in clinical settings. Our main objective is to propose multi-label classification of multivariate time series contained in medical records of chronically ill patients, by means of quantization methods, such as bag of words (BoW), and multi-label classification algorithms. Our second objective is to compare supervised dimensionality reduction techniques to state-of-the-art multi-label classification algorithms. The hypothesis is that kernel methods and locality preserving projections make such algorithms good candidates to study multi-label medical time series.
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Progesterone and nestorone promote myelin regeneration in chronic demyelinating lesions of corpus callosum and cerebral cortex.
Glia
PUBLISHED: 04-18-2014
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Multiple Sclerosis affects mainly women and consists in intermittent or chronic damages to the myelin sheaths, focal inflammation, and axonal degeneration. Current therapies are limited to immunomodulators and antiinflammatory drugs, but there is no efficient treatment for stimulating the endogenous capacity of myelin repair. Progesterone and synthetic progestins have been shown in animal models of demyelination to attenuate myelin loss, reduce clinical symptoms severity, modulate inflammatory responses and partially reverse the age-dependent decline in remyelination. Moreover, progesterone has been demonstrated to promote myelin formation in organotypic cultures of cerebellar slices. In the present study, we show that progesterone and the synthetic 19-nor-progesterone derivative Nestorone® promote the repair of severe chronic demyelinating lesions induced by feeding cuprizone to female mice for up to 12 weeks. Progesterone and Nestorone increase the density of NG2(+) oligodendrocyte progenitor cells and CA II(+) mature oligodendrocytes and enhance the formation of myelin basic protein (MBP)- and proteolipid protein (PLP)-immunoreactive myelin. However, while demyelination in response to cuprizone was less marked in corpus callosum than in cerebral cortex, remyelination appeared earlier in the former. The remyelinating effect of progesterone was progesterone receptor (PR)-dependent, as it was absent in PR-knockout mice. Progesterone and Nestorone also decreased (but did not suppress) neuroinflammatory responses, specifically astrocyte and microglial cell activation. Therefore, some progestogens are promising therapeutic candidates for promoting the regeneration of myelin. GLIA 2015;63:104-117.
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Modelling human development and disease in pluripotent stem-cell-derived gastric organoids.
Nature
PUBLISHED: 02-12-2014
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Gastric diseases, including peptic ulcer disease and gastric cancer, affect 10% of the world's population and are largely due to chronic Helicobacter pylori infection. Species differences in embryonic development and architecture of the adult stomach make animal models suboptimal for studying human stomach organogenesis and pathogenesis, and there is no experimental model of normal human gastric mucosa. Here we report the de novo generation of three-dimensional human gastric tissue in vitro through the directed differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells. We show that temporal manipulation of the FGF, WNT, BMP, retinoic acid and EGF signalling pathways and three-dimensional growth are sufficient to generate human gastric organoids (hGOs). Developing hGOs progressed through molecular and morphogenetic stages that were nearly identical to the developing antrum of the mouse stomach. Organoids formed primitive gastric gland- and pit-like domains, proliferative zones containing LGR5-expressing cells, surface and antral mucous cells, and a diversity of gastric endocrine cells. We used hGO cultures to identify novel signalling mechanisms that regulate early endoderm patterning and gastric endocrine cell differentiation upstream of the transcription factor NEUROG3. Using hGOs to model pathogenesis of human disease, we found that H. pylori infection resulted in rapid association of the virulence factor CagA with the c-Met receptor, activation of signalling and induction of epithelial proliferation. Together, these studies describe a new and robust in vitro system for elucidating the mechanisms underlying human stomach development and disease.
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Crosstalks between Cytokines and Sonic Hedgehog in Helicobacter pylori Infection: A Mathematical Model.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2014
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Helicobacter pylori infection of gastric tissue results in an immune response dominated by Th1 cytokines and has also been linked with dysregulation of Sonic Hedgehog (SHH) signaling pathway in gastric tissue. However, since interactions between the cytokines and SHH during H. pylori infection are not well understood, any mechanistic understanding achieved through interpretation of the statistical analysis of experimental results in the context of currently known circuit must be carefully scrutinized. Here, we use mathematical modeling aided by restraints of experimental data to evaluate the consistency between experimental results and temporal behavior of H. pylori activated cytokine circuit model. Statistical analysis of qPCR data from uninfected and H. pylori infected wild-type and parietal cell-specific SHH knockout (PC-SHHKO) mice for day 7 and 180 indicate significant changes that suggest role of SHH in cytokine regulation. The experimentally observed changes are further investigated using a mathematical model that examines dynamic crosstalks among pro-inflammatory (IL1?, IL-12, IFN?, MIP-2) cytokines, anti-inflammatory (IL-10) cytokines and SHH during H. pylori infection. Response analysis of the resulting model demonstrates that circuitry, as currently known, is inadequate for explaining of the experimental observations; suggesting the need for additional specific regulatory interactions. A key advantage of a computational model is the ability to propose putative circuit models for in-silico experimentation. We use this approach to propose a parsimonious model that incorporates crosstalks between NF?B, SHH, IL-1? and IL-10, resulting in a feedback loop capable of exhibiting cyclic behavior. Separately, we show that analysis of an independent time-series GEO microarray data for IL-1?, IFN? and IL-10 in mock and H. pylori infected mice further supports the proposed hypothesis that these cytokines may follow a cyclic trend. Predictions from the in-silico model provide useful insights for generating new hypothesis and design of subsequent experimental studies.
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Analgesic strategies aimed at stimulating the endogenous production of allopregnanolone.
Front Cell Neurosci
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2014
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A growing number of studies indicate that 3-alpha reduced neurosteroids are remarkable analgesics in various pain states. This is the case for allopregnanolone (AP), one of the most potent endogenous positive allosteric modulators of GABAA receptor function. From the pioneering work of Hans Selye, who described the sedative properties of steroids, synthetic compounds resembling the progesterone metabolite AP have been developed. If some of them have been used as anesthetics, it seems difficult to propose them as a therapeutic option for pain since they display several adverse side effects such as sedation, amnesia and functional tolerance. An alternative strategy, chosen by few laboratories around the world, is aimed at stimulating the local production of 3-alpha reduced neurosteroids in order to limit these well-known side effects. This pharmacological approach has the advantage of targeting specific structures, fully equipped with the necessary biosynthetic enzymatic machinery, where neurosteroids already act as endogenous pain modulators. The various pharmacological trials which attempted to treat pain symptoms by stimulating the production of 3-alpha reduced neurosteroids are reviewed here, as well as novel neurotransmitter systems possibly regulating their endogenous production.
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Therapeutic Effects of Progesterone in Animal Models of Neurological Disorders.
CNS Neurol Disord Drug Targets
PUBLISHED: 11-29-2013
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Substantial evidence supports that progesterone exerts many functions in the central and peripheral nervous system unrelated to its classical role in reproduction. In this review we first discussed progesterone effects following binding to the classical intracellular progesterone receptors A and B and several forms of membrane progesterone receptors, the modulation of intracellular signalling cascades and the interaction of progesterone reduced metabolites with neurotransmitter receptors. We next described our results involving animal models of human neuropathologies to elucidate the protective roles of progesterone. We described: (a) the protective and promyelinating effects of progesterone in experimental spinal cord injury, (b) the progesterone protective effects exerted upon motoneurons in the degenerating spinal cord of Wobbler mouse model of amyotropic lateral sclerosis; (c) the protective and anti-inflammatory effects of progesterone in the murine experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis model of multiple sclerosis and after lysolecithin demyelination; (d) the progesterone prevention of nociception and neuropathic pain which follow spinal cord injury, and (e) the protective effect of progesterone in experimental ischemic stroke. Whenever available, the molecular mechanisms involved in these progesterone effects were examined. The multiplicity of progesterone beneficial effects has opened new venues of research for neurological disorders. In this way, results obtained in animal models could provide the basis for novel therapeutic strategies and pre-clinical studies.
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Hypoglossal-facial nerve "side"-to-side neurorrhaphy for persistent incomplete facial palsy.
J. Neurosurg.
PUBLISHED: 11-08-2013
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Object Hypoglossal-facial nerve neurorrhaphy is a widely used method for treating complete facial palsy. However, the classic surgical procedure using a "side"-to-end neurorrhaphy is not suitable for incomplete facial palsy (IFP), because sectioning of the facial nerve for neurorrhaphy compromises remnant axons and potential spontaneous reinnervation. For the treatment of persistent IFP, the authors investigated in rats a modified method using hypoglossal-facial nerve "side"-to-side neurorrhaphy. Methods An IFP model was created by crushing the facial nerve and then ligating the injury site to limit axonal regeneration. After 9 weeks, rats with IFP were submitted to hypoglossal-facial nerve "side"-to-side neurorrhaphy: The gap between the 2 nerves was bridged with a predegenerated peroneal nerve graft, which was sutured to only one-half of the hypoglossal nerve and to the remnant facial nerve through a small window created by removing the epineurium, thus preserving regenerating facial axons. Results Four months after repair surgery, double innervation of the target whisker pad by hypoglossal and facial motor neurons was supported by the recording of muscle action potentials and their retrograde labeling. Regenerated hypoglossal and facial motor neurons effectively participated in the reinnervation of the whisker pad, significantly improving facial symmetry without evident synkinesis, compared with rats that underwent IFP without hypoglossal-facial nerve neurorrhaphy. Conclusions This study demonstrates that hypoglossal-facial nerve "side"-to-side neurorrhaphy with a predegenerated nerve graft can lead to rapid functional benefits for persistent IFP without compromising the remnants of facial axons, thus providing a proof-of-feasibility for further studies in humans.
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Gastritis Promotes an Activated Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cell with a Phenotype Reminiscent of a Cancer-Promoting Cell.
Dig. Dis. Sci.
PUBLISHED: 06-24-2013
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Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) promote gastric cancer in response to gastritis. In culture, BM-MSCs are prone to mutation with continued passage but it is unknown whether a similar process occurs in vivo in response to gastritis.
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Neuroprotection by steroids after neurotrauma in organotypic spinal cord cultures: a key role for progesterone receptors and steroidal modulators of GABAA receptors.
Neuropharmacology
PUBLISHED: 02-21-2013
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Progesterone is neuroprotective after spinal cord injury, however its mechanism of action remains unexplored. Here we used organotypic spinal cord slice cultures from 3 weeks-old mice to evaluate the mechanisms of neuroprotection by progesterone and its 5?-reduced metabolites. In vitro spinal cord injury, using a weight drop model, induced a decrease in the number of motoneurons. This was correlated with an increase in the number of dying cells (PI(+) cells) and in LDH release. Addition of 10 ?M of progesterone, 5?-dihydroprogesterone (5?-DHP) or allopregnanolone (3?, 5?-tetrahydroprogesterone) to the medium at the time of injury rescued the spinal cord slices from the effects of damage. Progesterone prevented membrane cell damage, motoneuron loss and cell death. These effects were not due to its bioconversion to 5?-DHP nor to allopregnanolone, as supported by the finasteride, an inhibitor of 5?-reductase enzymes, and by the absence of 5?-reduced progesterone metabolites in the slices analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The neuroprotective effects of progesterone required PR as they could not be observed in slices from homozygous knockout PR(-/-) mice. Allopregnanolone treatment was also neuroprotective. Its effects were not due to its bioconversion back to 5?-DHP, which can activate gene transcription via PR, because they were still observed in slices from knockout PR(-/-) mice. Allopregnanolone effects involved GABAA receptors, as they were inhibited by the selective GABAA receptor antagonist Gabazine, in both PR(+/+) and PR(-/-) mice. Altogether, these findings identify both PR and GABAA receptors as important targets for neuroprotection by progestagens after spinal cord injury.
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The neural androgen receptor: a therapeutic target for myelin repair in chronic demyelination.
Brain
PUBLISHED: 02-01-2013
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Myelin regeneration is a major therapeutic goal in demyelinating diseases, and the failure to remyelinate rapidly has profound consequences for the health of axons and for brain function. However, there is no efficient treatment for stimulating myelin repair, and current therapies are limited to anti-inflammatory agents. Males are less likely to develop multiple sclerosis than females, but often have a more severe disease course and reach disability milestones at an earlier age than females, and these observations have spurred interest in the potential protective effects of androgens. Here, we demonstrate that testosterone treatment efficiently stimulates the formation of new myelin and reverses myelin damage in chronic demyelinated brain lesions, resulting from the long-term administration of cuprizone, which is toxic for oligodendrocytes. In addition to the strong effect of testosterone on myelin repair, the number of activated astrocytes and microglial cells returned to low control levels, indicating a reduction of neuroinflammatory responses. We also identify the neural androgen receptor as a novel therapeutic target for myelin recovery. After the acute demyelination of cerebellar slices in organotypic culture, the remyelinating actions of testosterone could be mimicked by 5?-dihydrotestosterone, a metabolite that is not converted to oestrogens, and blocked by the androgen receptor antagonist flutamide. Testosterone treatment also failed to promote remyelination after chronic cuprizone-induced demyelination in mice with a non-functional androgen receptor. Importantly, testosterone did not stimulate the formation of new myelin sheaths after specific knockout of the androgen receptor in neurons and macroglial cells. Thus, the neural brain androgen receptor is required for the remyelination effect of testosterone, whereas the presence of the receptor in microglia and in peripheral tissues is not sufficient to enhance remyelination. The potent synthetic testosterone analogue 7?-methyl-19-nortestosterone, which has been developed for long-term male contraception and androgen replacement therapy in hypogonadal males and does not stimulate prostate growth, also efficiently promoted myelin repair. These data establish the efficacy of androgens as remyelinating agents and qualify the brain androgen receptor as a promising drug target for remyelination therapy, thus providing the preclinical rationale for a novel therapeutic use of androgens in males with multiple sclerosis.
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Estrogen-regulated synaptogenesis in the hippocampus: sexual dimorphism in vivo but not in vitro.
J. Steroid Biochem. Mol. Biol.
PUBLISHED: 10-07-2011
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Hippocampal neurons are capable of synthesizing estradiol de novo. Estradiol synthesis can be suppressed by aromatase inhibitors and by knock-down of steroid acute regulatory protein (StAR), whereas elevated levels of substrates of steroidogenesis enhance estradiol synthesis. In rat hippocampal cultures, the expression of estrogen receptors (ERs) and synaptic proteins, as well as synapse density, correlated positively with aromatase activity, regardless of whether the cultures originated from males or females. All effects induced by the inhibition of aromatase activity were rescued by application of estradiol to the cultures. In vivo, however, systemic application of letrozole, an aromatase inhibitor, induced synapse loss in female rats, but not in males. Furthermore, in the female hippocampus, density of spines and spine synapses varied with the estrus cycle. In addressing this in vivo-in vitro discrepancy, we found that gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) regulated estradiol synthesis via an aromatase-mediated mechanism and consistently regulated spine synapse density and the expression of synaptic proteins. Along these lines, GnRH receptor density was higher in the hippocampus than in the cortex and hypothalamus, and estrus cyclicity of spinogenesis was found in the hippocampus, but not in the cortex. Since GnRH receptor expression also varies with the estrus cycle, the sexual dimorphism in estrogen-regulated spine synapse density in the hippocampus very likely results from differences in the GnRH responsiveness of the male and the female hippocampus. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Neurosteroids.
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Progesterone and Nestorone facilitate axon remyelination: a role for progesterone receptors.
Endocrinology
PUBLISHED: 08-09-2011
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Enhancing the endogenous capacity of myelin repair is a major therapeutic challenge in demyelinating diseases such as multiple sclerosis. We found that progesterone and the synthetic 19-norprogesterone derivative 16-methylene-17?-acetoxy-19-norpregn-4-ene-3,20-dione (Nestorone) promote the remyelination of axons by oligodendrocytes after lysolecithin-induced demyelination in organotypic cultures of cerebellar slices taken from postnatal rats or mice. The intracellular progesterone receptors (PR) mediate the proremyelinating actions of Nestorone, because they are not observed in slices from PR knockout mice. Notably, Nestorone was less efficient in heterozygous mice, expressing reduced levels of PR, suggesting PR haploinsufficiency in myelin repair. Using mice expressing the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) under the control of the proteolipid gene promoter, we showed that both progesterone and Nestorone strongly increased the reappearance of cells of the oligodendroglial lineage in the demyelinated slices. In contrast to Nestorone, the pregnane derivative medroxyprogesterone acetate had no effect. The increase in oligodendroglial cells by Nestorone resulted from enhanced NG2(+) and Olig2(+) oligodendrocyte progenitor cell (OPC) recruitment. In cocultures of lysolecithin-demyelinated cerebellar slices from wild-type mice apposed to brain stem slices of proteolipid gene promoter-EGFP mice, Nestorone stimulated the migration of OPC towards demyelinated axons. In this coculture paradigm, Nestorone indeed markedly increased the number of EGFP(+) cells migrating into the demyelinated cerebellar slices. Our results show that Nestorone stimulates the recruitment and maturation of OPC, two steps which are limiting for efficient myelin repair. They may thus open new perspectives for the use of progestins, which selectively target PR, to promote the endogenous regeneration of myelin.
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Novel protective effect of mifepristone on detrimental GABAA receptor activity to immature Purkinje neurons.
FASEB J.
PUBLISHED: 07-27-2011
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Immature Purkinje neurons are particularly vulnerable cells. They survive in cerebellar slice cultures under treatment by the synthetic steroid mifepristone (RU486) that depolarizes them at this age. The present study aims at understanding the mechanism underlying this neuroprotective effect. In the developing cerebellum, the role of ?-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in neuron survival is unknown. In 3-d-old mouse cerebellar slice cultures, we show that GABA(A) receptor activation is depolarizing and excitatory. Antagonists of GABA(A) receptors rescue Purkinje neurons, demonstrating that GABA is endogenously released in this preparation and is toxic. Mifepristone likely protects these neurons by reversing GABA(A) receptor-mediated chloride fluxes and reducing their driving force. Neuroprotection by mifepristone is dose-dependently decreased by the agonist of GABA(A) receptors muscimol and by caffeine, an agonist of internal calcium store release. Moreover, the survival induced by neomycin, an inhibitor of calcium release, is partially reversed by muscimol. The p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) inhibitor SB239063 also rescues Purkinje neurons. In summary, we propose that when GABA is depolarizing, mifepristone protects Purkinje neurons by shunting GABA responses and probably chloride fluxes, by inhibiting p38 MAPK activity and likely internal calcium store release. A new and nonhormonal effect of mifepristone is thus revealed.
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Interplay between LXR and Wnt/?-catenin signaling in the negative regulation of peripheral myelin genes by oxysterols.
J. Neurosci.
PUBLISHED: 07-01-2011
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Oxysterols are reactive molecules generated from the oxidation of cholesterol. Their implication in cholesterol homeostasis and in the progression of neurodegenerative disorders is well known, but few data are available for their functions in the peripheral nervous system. Our aim was to study the influence of oxysterols on myelin gene expression and myelin sheath formation in peripheral nerves. We show by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry that Schwann cells and sciatic nerves contain 24(S)-hydroxycholesterol, 25-hydroxycholesterol, and 27-hydroxycholesterol and that they express their biosynthetic enzymes and receptors (liver X receptors LXR? and LXR?). We demonstrate that oxysterols inhibit peripheral myelin gene expression [myelin protein zero (MPZ) and peripheral myelin protein-22 (PMP22)] in a Schwann cell line. This downregulation is mediated by either LXR? or LXR?, depending on the promoter context, as suggested by siRNA strategy and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays in Schwann cells and in the sciatic nerve of LXR knock-out mice. Importantly, the knock-out of LXR in mice results in thinner myelin sheaths surrounding the axons. Oxysterols repress myelin genes via two mechanisms: by binding of LXRs to myelin gene promoters and by inhibiting the Wnt/?-catenin pathway that is crucial for the expression of myelin genes. The Wnt signaling components (Disheveled, TCF/LEF, ?-catenin) are strongly repressed by oxysterols. Furthermore, the recruitment of ?-catenin at the levels of the MPZ and PMP22 promoters is decreased. Our data reveal new endogenous mechanisms for the negative regulation of myelin gene expression, highlight the importance of oxysterols and LXR in peripheral nerve myelination, and open new perspectives of treating demyelinating diseases with LXR agonists.
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A comparison of different dosages of a continuous preperitoneal infusion and systemic administration of ropivacaine after laparotomy in rats.
Anesth. Analg.
PUBLISHED: 05-19-2011
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To further explain the mechanisms of action involved in the analgesic effect of a local anesthetic wound infusion, we evaluated parietal and visceral sensitivity as well as indices of inflammation after laparotomy and administration of a local anesthetic. Ropivacaine was administered at different dosages by a continuous infusion using a multiholed catheter in the preperitoneal position or systemically in rats.
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Progesterone attenuates astro- and microgliosis and enhances oligodendrocyte differentiation following spinal cord injury.
Exp. Neurol.
PUBLISHED: 05-09-2011
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Reactive gliosis, demyelination and proliferation of NG2+ oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPC) are common responses to spinal cord injury (SCI). We previously reported that short-term progesterone treatment stimulates OPC proliferation whereas chronic treatment enhances OPC differentiation after SCI. Presently, we further studied the proliferation/differentiation of glial cells involved in inflammation and remyelination in male rats with SCI subjected to acute (3 days) or chronic (21 days) progesterone administration. Rats received several pulses of bromodeoyuridine (BrdU) 48 and 72 h post-SCI, and sacrificed 3 or 21 days post-SCI. Double colocalization of BrdU and specific cell markers showed that 3 days of SCI induced a strong proliferation of S100?+ astrocytes, OX-42+ microglia/macrophages and NG2+ cells. At this stage, the intense GFAP+ astrogliosis was BrdU negative. Twenty one days of SCI enhanced maturation of S100?+ cells into GFAP+ astrocytes, but decreased the number of CC1+ oligodendrocytes. Progesterone treatment inhibited astrocyte and microglia /macrophage proliferation and activation in the 3-day SCI group, and inhibited activation in the 21-day SCI group. BrdU/NG2 double labeled cells were increased by progesterone at 3 days, indicating a proliferation stimulus, but decreased them at 21 days. However, progesterone-enhancement of CC1+/BrdU+ oligodendrocyte density, suggest differentiation of OPC into mature oligondendrocytes. We conclude that progesterone effects after SCI involves: a) inhibition of astrocyte proliferation and activation; b) anti-inflammatory effects by preventing microglial activation and proliferation, and c) early proliferation of NG2+ progenitors and late remyelination. Thus, progesterone behaves as a glioactive factor favoring remyelination and inhibiting reactive gliosis.
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Wnt/beta-catenin signaling is an essential and direct driver of myelin gene expression and myelinogenesis.
J. Neurosci.
PUBLISHED: 03-11-2011
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Wnt/?-catenin signaling plays a major role in the development of the nervous system and contributes to neuronal plasticity. However, its role in myelination remains unclear. Here, we identify the Wnt/?-catenin pathway as an essential driver of myelin gene expression. The selective inhibition of Wnt components by small interfering RNA or dominant-negative forms blocks the expression of myelin protein zero (MPZ) and peripheral myelin protein 22 (PMP22) in mouse Schwann cells and proteolipid protein in mouse oligodendrocytes. Moreover, the activation of Wnt signaling by recombinant Wnt1 ligand increases by threefold the transcription of myelin genes and enhances the binding of ?-catenin to T-cell factor/lymphoid-enhancer factor transcription factors present in the vicinity of the MPZ and PMP22 promoters. Most important, loss-of-function analyses in zebrafish embryos show, in vivo, a key role for Wnt/?-catenin signaling in the expression of myelin genes and in myelin sheath compaction, both in the peripheral and central nervous systems. Inhibition of Wnt/?-catenin signaling resulted in hypomyelination, without affecting Schwann cell and oligodendrocyte generation or axonal integrity. The present findings attribute to Wnt/?-catenin pathway components an essential role in myelin gene expression and myelinogenesis.
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Translocator protein (18 kDa) (TSPO) as a therapeutic target for neurological and psychiatric disorders.
Nat Rev Drug Discov
PUBLISHED: 12-02-2010
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The translocator protein (18 kDa) (TSPO) is localized primarily in the outer mitochondrial membrane of steroid-synthesizing cells, including those in the central and peripheral nervous system. One of its main functions is the transport of the substrate cholesterol into mitochondria, a prerequisite for steroid synthesis. TSPO expression may constitute a biomarker of brain inflammation and reactive gliosis that could be monitored by using TSPO ligands as neuroimaging agents. Moreover, initial clinical trials have indicated that TSPO ligands might be valuable in the treatment of neurological and psychiatric disorders. This Review focuses on the biology and pathophysiology of TSPO and the potential of currently available TSPO ligands for the diagnosis and treatment of neurological and psychiatric disorders.
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Hedgehog signaling regulates E-cadherin expression for the maintenance of the actin cytoskeleton and tight junctions.
Am. J. Physiol. Gastrointest. Liver Physiol.
PUBLISHED: 09-16-2010
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In the stomach, strictly regulated cell adherens junctions are crucial in determining epithelial cell differentiation. Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) regulates epithelial cell differentiation in the adult stomach. We sought to identify whether Shh plays a role in regulating adherens junction protein E-cadherin as a mechanism for epithelial cell differentiation. Mouse nontumorigenic gastric epithelial (IMGE-5) cells treated with Hedgehog signaling inhibitor cyclopamine and anti-Shh 5E1 antibody or transduced with short hairpin RNA against Skinny Hedgehog (IMGE-5(Ski)) were cultured. A mouse model expressing a parietal cell-specific deletion of Shh (HKCre/Shh(KO)) was used to identify further changes in adherens and tight junctions. Inhibition of Hedgehog signaling in IMGE-5 cells caused loss of E-cadherin expression accompanied by disruption of F-actin cortical expression and relocalization of zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1). Loss of E-cadherin was also associated with increased proliferation in IMGE-5(Ski) cells and increased expression of the mucous neck cell lineage marker MUC6. Compared with membrane-expressed E-cadherin and ZO-1 protein in controls, dissociation of E-cadherin/?-catenin and ZO-1/occludin protein complexes was observed in HKCre/Shh(KO) mice. In conclusion, we demonstrate that Hedgehog signaling regulates E-cadherin expression that is required for the maintenance of F-actin cortical expression and stability of tight junction protein ZO-1.
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Interoperability prototype between hospitals and general practitioners in Switzerland.
Stud Health Technol Inform
PUBLISHED: 09-16-2010
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Interoperability in data exchange has the potential to improve the care processes and decrease costs of the health care system. Many countries have related eHealth initiatives in preparation or already implemented. In this area, Switzerland has yet to catch up. Its health system is fragmented, because of the federated nature of cantons. It is thus more difficult to coordinate efforts between the existing healthcare actors. In the Medicoordination project a pragmatic approach was selected: integrating several partners in healthcare on a regional scale in French speaking Switzerland. In parallel with the Swiss eHealth strategy, currently being elaborated by the Swiss confederation, particularly medium-sized hospitals and general practitioners were targeted in Medicoordination to implement concrete scenarios of information exchange between hospitals and general practitioners with a high added value. In this paper we focus our attention on a prototype implementation of one chosen scenario: the discharge summary. Although simple in concept, exchanging release letters shows small, hidden difficulties due to the multi-partner nature of the project. The added value of such a prototype is potentially high and it is now important to show that interoperability can work in practice.
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Hormonal influences in multiple sclerosis: new therapeutic benefits for steroids.
Maturitas
PUBLISHED: 08-11-2010
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Multiple sclerosis (MS) is one of the most common neurological disorders. It affects mainly women. This autoimmune disease of the central nervous system (CNS) is characterized by intermittent or chronic damage to the myelin sheaths (demyelination), focal inflammation and axonal degeneration. During the early relapsing/remitting stages of MS, myelin can regenerate, but as the disease progresses the remyelination of axons becomes insufficient, leading to impaired axon conduction, neurodegeneration and the worsening of symptoms. The present pharmacological treatment of MS is limited to the administration of immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory drugs, which are only palliative and do not significantly slow progress of the disease. What are needed are agents that target different cell types in the CNS to protect axonal networks and stimulate the endogenous capacity of myelin repair. Estrogens and progestins may be the basis for such a new therapeutic approach. Although clinical observations provide only indirect or insufficient evidence for an influence of sex steroids on the progress of MS, experimental studies have shown that estrogens and progestins exert multiple beneficial effects in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a widely used MS disease model. Moreover, both types of hormones have been shown to promote the viability of neurons and the formation of myelin. These promising experimental results should encourage the launch of prospective clinical studies to clarify the influence of hormones on the course of MS and the effect of hormone treatments, in particular those presently used in contraception and hormone replacement therapy (HRT).
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Health-Identity: mobile services for consumers of medicines.
Stud Health Technol Inform
PUBLISHED: 06-15-2010
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New technologies for drug identification, traceability and mobile platforms make it possible to personalise the services provided to consumers of medicine. This paper presents the Health-Identity platform, a mobile application which gives consumers the assurance that the drug they have in their hands is a genuine product and can be consumed without risk according to their stored patient profile (allergies, health state, current medication, etc.).
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Steroid profiling in preeclamptic women: evidence for aromatase deficiency.
Am. J. Obstet. Gynecol.
PUBLISHED: 03-19-2010
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Experimental data have revealed the critical role played by 2-methoxy-estradiol, a metabolite of 17?-estradiol, in the pathophysiology of preeclampsia. We used gas chromatography/mass spectrometry to measure a whole panel of hormonal steroids in the plasma from women during the third trimester of their pregnancy.
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A role for FKBP52 in Tau protein function.
Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A.
PUBLISHED: 01-25-2010
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Tau is a microtubule-associated protein, which is widely expressed in the central nervous system, predominantly in neurons, where it regulates microtubule dynamics, axonal transport, and neurite outgrowth. The aberrant assembly of Tau is the hallmark of several human neurodegenerative diseases, collectively known as tauopathies. They include Alzheimers disease, Picks disease, progressive supranuclear palsy, and frontotemporal dementia and parkinsonism linked to chromosome 17. Several abnormalities in Tau, such as hyperphosphorylation and aggregation, alter its function and are central to the pathogenic process. Here, we describe biochemical and functional interactions between FKBP52 and Tau. FKBP52 is a member of the FKBP (FK506-binding protein) family that comprises intracellular protein effectors of immunosuppressive drugs (such as FK506 and rapamycin). We found that FKBP52, which is abundant in brain, binds directly and specifically to Tau, especially in its hyperphosphorylated form. The relevance of this observation was confirmed by the colocalization of both proteins in the distal part of the axons of cortical neurons and by the antagonistic effect of FKBP52 on the ability of Tau to promote microtubule assembly. Overexpression of FKBP52 in differentiated PC12 cells prevented the accumulation of Tau and resulted in reduced neurite length. Taken together, these findings indicate a role for FKBP52 in Tau function and may help to decipher and modulate the events involved in Tau-induced neurodegeneration.
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Normal spermatogenesis in a man with mutant luteinizing hormone.
N. Engl. J. Med.
PUBLISHED: 11-06-2009
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Men with mutations in LHB, the gene encoding the beta subunit of luteinizing hormone (LHB), have azoospermia with absent or few fetal Leydig cells. We report a mutation in LHB in a man and his sister. The man presented with absence of virilization, undetectable luteinizing hormone, and a low serum testosterone level. He had complete spermatogenesis with a normal sperm count. The mutant luteinizing hormone had a low level of partial activity in vitro. We concluded that the residual luteinizing hormone activity, resulting in the expression of steroidogenic enzymes in few mature Leydig cells producing small amounts of intratesticular testosterone (20.2 ng per gram), was sufficient for complete and quantitatively normal spermatogenesis.
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Loss of parietal cell expression of Sonic hedgehog induces hypergastrinemia and hyperproliferation of surface mucous cells.
Gastroenterology
PUBLISHED: 11-03-2009
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Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) is expressed in the adult stomach, but its role as a gastric morphogen is unclear. We sought to identify mechanisms by which Shh might regulate gastric epithelial cell function and differentiation.
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MediCoordination: a practical approach to interoperability in the Swiss health system.
Stud Health Technol Inform
PUBLISHED: 09-12-2009
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Interoperability and data exchange between partners in the health sector is seen as one of the important domains that can improve care processes and in the long run also decrease costs of the health care system. Data exchange can assure that the data on the patient are as complete as possible avoiding potential mistreatments, and it can avoid double examinations if the data required are already available. On the other hand, health data is a sensible point for many people and strong protection needs to be implemented to protect patient data against misuse as well as tools to let the patient manage his/her own data. Many countries have eHealth initiatives in preparation or already implemented. However, health data exchange on a large scale still has a fairly long way to go as the political processes for global solutions are often complicated. In the MediCoordination project a pragmatic approach is selected trying to integrate several partners in health care on a regional scale. In parallel with the Swiss eHealth strategy that is currently being elaborated by the Swiss confederation, particularly medium-sized hospitals and external partners are targeted in MediCoordination to implement concrete added-value scenarios of information exchange between hospitals and external medical actors.
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Cross-talk between oxysterols and glucocorticoids: differential regulation of secreted phopholipase A2 and impact on oligodendrocyte death.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 07-15-2009
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Oxysterols are oxidized forms of cholesterol. They have been shown to be implicated in cholesterol turnover, inflammation and in neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimers disease and multiple sclerosis. Glial cells are targets of oxysterols: they inhibit astrocyte proliferation after brain injury, and we have previously shown that 25-hydroxycholesterol (25OH) provokes oligodendrocyte apoptosis and stimulates the expression of sPLA2 type IIA (sPLA2-IIA), which has a protective effect.
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Stage dependent effects of progesterone on motoneurons and glial cells of wobbler mouse spinal cord degeneration.
Cell. Mol. Neurobiol.
PUBLISHED: 07-14-2009
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In the Wobbler mouse, a mutation in the Vps54 gene is accompanied by motoneuron degeneration and astrogliosis in the cervical spinal cord. Previous work has shown that these abnormalities are greatly attenuated by progesterone treatment of clinically afflicted Wobblers. However, whether progesterone is effective at all disease stages has not yet been tested. The present work used genotyped (wr/wr) Wobbler mice at three periods of the disease: early progressive (1-2 months), established (5-8 months) or late stages (12 months) and age-matched wildtype controls (NFR/NFR), half of which were implanted with a progesterone pellet (20 mg) for 18 days. In untreated Wobblers, degenerating vacuolated motoneurons were initially abundant, experienced a slight reduction at the established stage and dramatically diminished during the late period. In motoneurons, the cholinergic marker choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) was reduced at all stages of the Wobbler disease, whereas hyperexpression of the growth-associated protein (GAP43) mRNA preferentially occurred at the early progressive and established stages. Progesterone therapy significantly reduced motoneuron vacuolation, enhanced ChAT immunoreactive perikarya and reduced the hyperexpression of GAP43 during the early progressive and established stages. At all stage periods, untreated Wobblers showed high density of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)+ astrocytes and decreased number of glutamine synthase (GS) immunostained cells. Progesterone treatment down-regulated GFAP+ astrocytes and up-regulated GS+ cell number. These data reinforced the usefulness of progesterone to improve motoneuron and glial cell abnormalities of Wobbler mice and further showed that therapeutic benefit seems more effective at the early progressive and established periods, rather than on advance stages of spinal cord neurodegeneration.
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Effects of progesterone on oligodendrocyte progenitors, oligodendrocyte transcription factors, and myelin proteins following spinal cord injury.
Glia
PUBLISHED: 07-10-2009
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Progesterone is emerging as a myelinizing factor for central nervous system injury. Successful remyelination requires proliferation and differentiation of oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPC) into myelinating oligodendrocytes, but this process is incomplete following injury. To study progesterone actions on remyelination, we administered progesterone (16 mg/kg/day) to rats with complete spinal cord injury. Rats were euthanized 3 or 21 days after steroid treatment. Short progesterone treatment (a) increased the number of OPC without effect on the injury-induced reduction of mature oligodendrocytes, (b) increased mRNA and protein expression for the myelin basic protein (MBP) without effects on proteolipid protein (PLP) or myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG), and (c) increased the mRNA for Olig2 and Nkx2.2 transcription factors involved in specification and differentiation of the oligodendrocyte lineage. Furthermore, long progesterone treatment (a) reduced OPC with a concomitant increase of oligodendrocytes; (b) promoted differentiation of cells that incorporated bromodeoxyuridine, early after injury, into mature oligodendrocytes; (c) increased mRNA and protein expression of PLP without effects on MBP or MOG; and (d) increased mRNA for the Olig1 transcription factor involved in myelin repair. These results suggest that early progesterone treatment enhanced the density of OPC and induced their differentiation into mature oligodendrocytes by increasing the expression of Olig2 and Nkx2.2. Twenty-one days after injury, progesterone favors remyelination by increasing Olig1 (involved in repair of demyelinated lesions), PLP expression, and enhancing oligodendrocytes maturation. Thus, progesterone effects on oligodendrogenesis and myelin proteins may constitute fundamental steps for repairing traumatic injury inflicted to the spinal cord.
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Translocator protein (18 kD) as target for anxiolytics without benzodiazepine-like side effects.
Science
PUBLISHED: 06-18-2009
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Most antianxiety drugs (anxiolytics) work by modulating neurotransmitters in the brain. Benzodiazepines are fast and effective anxiolytic drugs; however, their long-term use is limited by the development of tolerance and withdrawal symptoms. Ligands of the translocator protein [18 kilodaltons (kD)] may promote the synthesis of endogenous neurosteroids, which also exert anxiolytic effects in animal models. Here, we found that the translocator protein (18 kD) ligand XBD173 enhanced gamma-aminobutyric acid-mediated neurotransmission and counteracted induced panic attacks in rodents in the absence of sedation and tolerance development. XBD173 also exerted antipanic activity in humans and, in contrast to benzodiazepines, did not cause sedation or withdrawal symptoms. Thus, translocator protein (18 kD) ligands are promising candidates for fast-acting anxiolytic drugs with less severe side effects than benzodiazepines.
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Analysis of pregnenolone and dehydroepiandrosterone in rodent brain: cholesterol autoxidation is the key.
J. Lipid Res.
PUBLISHED: 06-08-2009
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Pregnenolone (PREG) and dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), and their respective sulfated forms PREGS and DHEAS, were among the first steroids to be identified in rodent brain. However, unreliable steroid isolation and solvolysis procedures resulted in errors, particularly in the case of brain steroid sulfates analyzed by radioimmunology or GC-MS of liberated free steroids. By using a solid-phase extraction recycling/elution procedure, allowing the strict separation of sulfated, free, and fatty acid esters of PREG and DHEA, PREGS and DHEAS, unlike free PREG, were not detected in rat and mouse brain and plasma. Conversely, considerable amounts of PREG and DHEA were released from unknown precursor(s) present in the lipoidal fraction, distinct from fatty acid ester conjugates. Chromatographic and mass spectrometric studies of the nature of the precursor(s) showed that autoxidation of brain cholesterol (CHOL) was responsible for the release of PREG and DHEA from the lipoidal fraction. When inappropriate protocols were used, CHOL was also the precursor of PREG and DHEA obtained from the fraction assumed to contain sulfated steroids. In contrast, free PREG was definitely confirmed as an endogenous steroid in rat brain. Our study shows that an early removal of CHOL from brain extracts coupled to well-validated extraction and fractionation procedures are prerequisites for reliable measurements of free and conjugated PREG and DHEA by GC-MS or other indirect methods.
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Progesterone effects on neuronal ultrastructure and expression of microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2) in rats with acute spinal cord injury.
Cell. Mol. Neurobiol.
PUBLISHED: 03-21-2009
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(1) Following acute spinal cord injury, progesterone modulates several molecules essential for motoneuron function, although the morphological substrates for these effects are unknown. (2) The present study analyzed morphological changes in motoneurons distal to the lesion site from rats with or without progesterone treatment. We employed electron microscopy to study changes in nucleus and cytoplasm and immunohistochemistry for the microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2) for changes in cytoskeleton. (3) After spinal cord injury, the nucleoplasm appeared more finely dispersed resulting in reduced electron opacity and the nucleus adopted an eccentric position. Changes of perikarya included dissolution of Nissl bodies and dissociation of polyribosomes (chromatolysis). After progesterone treatment for 3 days, the deafferented motoneurons now presented a clumped nucleoplasm, a better-preserved rough endoplasmic reticulum and absence of chromatolysis. Progesterone partially prevented development of nuclear eccentricity. Whereas 50% of injured motoneurons showed nuclear eccentricity, only 16% presented this phenotype after receiving progesterone. Additionally, injured rats showed reduced immunostaining for MAP2 in dendrites, pointing to cytoskeleton abnormalities, whereas progesterone treatment attenuated the injury-induced loss of MAP2. (4) Our data indicated that progesterone maintained in part neuronal ultrastructure, attenuated chromatolysis, and preclude the loss of MAP2, suggesting a protective effect during the early phases of spinal cord injury.
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Correlation of degree of penile curvature between patient estimates and objective measures among men with Peyronies disease.
J Sex Med
PUBLISHED: 03-17-2009
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: Among men with Peyronies disease (PD), the degree of penile curvature has significant implications on psychological well-being, sexual function, treatment planning, and posttherapy evaluations.
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25-hydroxycholesterol provokes oligodendrocyte cell line apoptosis and stimulates the secreted phospholipase A2 type IIA via LXR beta and PXR.
J. Neurochem.
PUBLISHED: 02-24-2009
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In several neurodegenerative diseases of the CNS, oligodendrocytes are implicated in an inflammatory process associated with altered levels of oxysterols and inflammatory enzymes such as secreted phospholipase A2 (sPLA2). In view of the scarce literature related to this topic, we investigated oxysterol effects on these myelinating glial cells. Natural oxysterol 25-hydroxycholesterol (25-OH; 1 and 10 microM) altered oligodendrocyte cell line (158N) morphology and triggered apoptosis (75% of apoptosis after 72 h). These effects were mimicked by 22(S)-OH (1 and 10 microM) which does not activate liver X receptor (LXR) but not by a synthetic LXR ligand (T0901317). Therefore, oxysterol-induced apoptosis appears to be independent of LXR. Interestingly, sPLA2 type IIA (sPLA2-IIA) over-expression partially rescued 158N cells from oxysterol-induced apoptosis. In fact, 25-OH, 24(S)-OH, and T0901317 stimulated sPLA2-IIA promoter and sPLA2 activity in oligodendrocyte cell line. Accordingly, administration of T0901317 to mice enhanced sPLA2 activity in brain extracts by twofold. Short interfering RNA strategy allowed to establish that stimulation of sPLA2-IIA is mediated by pregnane X receptor (PXR) at high oxysterol concentration (10 microM) and by LXR beta at basal oxysterol concentration. Finally, GC coupled to mass spectrometry established that oligodendrocytes contain oxysterols and express their biosynthetic enzymes, suggesting that they may act through autocrine/paracrine mechanism. Our results show the diversity of oxysterol signalling in the CNS and highlight the positive effects of the LXR/PXR pathway which may open new perspectives in the treatment of demyelinating and neurodegenerative diseases.
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Progesterone neuroprotection in traumatic CNS injury and motoneuron degeneration.
Front Neuroendocrinol
PUBLISHED: 02-04-2009
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Studies on the neuroprotective and promyelinating effects of progesterone in the nervous system are of great interest due to their potential clinical connotations. In peripheral neuropathies, progesterone and reduced derivatives promote remyelination, axonal regeneration and the recovery of function. In traumatic brain injury (TBI), progesterone has the ability to reduce edema and inflammatory cytokines, prevent neuronal loss and improve functional outcomes. Clinical trials have shown that short-and long-term progesterone treatment induces a significant improvement in the level of disability among patients with brain injury. In experimental spinal cord injury (SCI), molecular markers of functional motoneurons become impaired, including brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) mRNA, Na,K-ATPase mRNA, microtubule-associated protein 2 and choline acetyltransferase (ChAT). SCI also produces motoneuron chromatolysis. Progesterone treatment restores the expression of these molecules while chromatolysis subsided. SCI also causes oligodendrocyte loss and demyelination. In this case, a short progesterone treatment enhances proliferation and differentiation of oligodendrocyte progenitors into mature myelin-producing cells, whereas prolonged treatment increases a transcription factor (Olig1) needed to repair injury-induced demyelination. Progesterone neuroprotection has also been shown in motoneuron neurodegeneration. In Wobbler mice spinal cord, progesterone reverses the impaired expression of BDNF, ChAT and Na,K-ATPase, prevents vacuolar motoneuron degeneration and the development of mitochondrial abnormalities, while functionally increases muscle strength and the survival of Wobbler mice. Multiple mechanisms contribute to these progesterone effects, and the role played by classical nuclear receptors, extra nuclear receptors, membrane receptors, and the reduced metabolites of progesterone in neuroprotection and myelin formation remain an exciting field worth of exploration.
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Sonic Hedgehog contributes to gastric mucosal restitution after injury.
Lab. Invest.
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Eradication of Helicobacter pylori correlates with regeneration of the gastric epithelium, ulcer healing and re-expression of the gastric morphogen Sonic Hedgehog (Shh). We sought to identify the role of Shh as a regulator of gastric epithelial regeneration during wound healing. A mouse model expressing a parietal cell-specific, tamoxifen-inducible deletion of Shh (HKCre(ERT2);Shh(flox/flox) or PC-iShhKO) was developed. Stomachs were collected and compared 7-150 days after the final vehicle or tamoxifen injection. Ulcers were induced in both controls and PC-iShhKO mice using acetic acid and ulcer size compared 1 and 7 days post induction. (1) Re-expression of Shh correlates with decreased hyperproliferation: Compared to controls, PC-iShhKO mice developed foveolar hyperplasia. Restoration of normal gastric epithelial architecture and differentiation correlated with the re-expression of Shh in PC-iShhKO mice 150 days after the final tamoxifen injection. At the tamoxifen dose used to induce Cre recombination there was no genotoxicity reported in either HKCre(ERT2) or Shh(flox/flox) control mouse stomachs. (2) Delayed wound healing in PC-iShhKO mouse stomachs: To identify the role of Shh in gastric regeneration, an acetic acid ulcer was induced in control and PC-iShhKO mice. Ulcers began to heal in control mice by 7 days after induction. Ulcer healing was documented by decreased ulcer size, angiogenesis, macrophage infiltration and formation of granulation tissue that correlated with the re-expression of Shh within the ulcerated tissue. PC-iShhKO mice did not show evidence of ulcer healing. Re-expression of Shh contributes to gastric regeneration. Our current study may have clinical implications given that eradication of H. pylori correlates with re-expression of Shh, regeneration of the gastric epithelium and ulcer healing.
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Techniques for following labeled cells in vivo: use of X/Y FISH, techniques to optimize fluorescent detection, and beta-galactosidase detection.
Methods Mol. Biol.
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The redistribution and trafficking patterns of cells to different anatomic sites throughout the body is important during cancer development and metastasis. Interest in the origin and fate of gastric cancer stem cells has recently arisen, as it may explain the underlying mechanism of cancer development. The ability to monitor the migration patterns of cancer stem cells is imperative to understanding the functional changes associated with the migration and proliferation of these cells. Here we detail a collection of techniques that include fluorescent in vivo imaging, X/Y FISH, and beta-galactosidase detection that are used for following labeled cells in vivo after adoptive transfer or transplant of donor cells for identifying the migration and engraftment of donor cells within the recipient.
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Progesterone receptors: a key for neuroprotection in experimental stroke.
Endocrinology
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Progesterone receptors (PR) are expressed throughout the brain. However, their functional significance remains understudied. Here we report a novel role of PR as crucial mediators of neuroprotection using a model of transient middle cerebral artery occlusion and PR knockout mice. Six hours after ischemia, we observed a rapid increase in progesterone and 5?-dihydroprogesterone, the endogenous PR ligands, a process that may be a part of the natural neuroprotective mechanisms. PR deficiency, and even haploinsufficiency, increases the susceptibility of the brain to stroke damage. Within a time window of 24 h, PR-dependent signaling of endogenous brain progesterone limits the extent of tissue damage and the impairment of motor functions. Longer-term improvement requires additional treatment with exogenous progesterone and is also PR dependent. The potent and selective PR agonist Nestorone is also effective. In contrast to progesterone, levels of the neurosteroid allopregnanolone, which modulates ?-aminobutyric acid type A receptors, did not increase after stroke, but its administration protected both wild-type and PR-deficient mice against ischemic damage. These results show that 1) PR are linked to signaling pathways that influence susceptibility to stroke, and 2) PR are direct key targets for both endogenous neuroprotection and for therapeutic strategies after stroke, and they suggest a novel indication for synthetic progestins already validated for contraception. Although allopregnanolone may not be an endogenous neuroprotective agent, its administration protects the brain against ischemic damage by signaling mechanisms not involving PR. Collectively, our data clarify the relative roles of PR and allopregnanolone in neuroprotection after stroke.
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Lithium enhances remyelination of peripheral nerves.
Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A.
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Glycogen synthase kinase 3? (GSK3?) inhibitors, especially the mood stabilizer lithium chloride, are also used as neuroprotective or anti-inflammatory agents. We studied the influence of LiCl on the remyelination of peripheral nerves. We showed that the treatment of adult mice with LiCl after facial nerve crush injury stimulated the expression of myelin genes, restored the myelin structure, and accelerated the recovery of whisker movements. LiCl treatment also promoted remyelination of the sciatic nerve after crush. We also demonstrated that peripheral myelin gene MPZ and PMP22 promoter activities, transcripts, and protein levels are stimulated by GSK3? inhibitors (LiCl and SB216763) in Schwann cells as well as in sciatic and facial nerves. LiCl exerts its action in Schwann cells by increasing the amount of ?-catenin and provoking its nuclear localization. We showed by ChIP experiments that LiCl treatment drives ?-catenin to bind to T-cell factor/lymphoid-enhancer factor response elements identified in myelin genes. Taken together, our findings open perspectives in the treatment of nerve demyelination by administering GSK3? inhibitors such as lithium.
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Progesterone synthesis in the nervous system: implications for myelination and myelin repair.
Front Neurosci
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Progesterone is well known as a female reproductive hormone and in particular for its role in uterine receptivity, implantation, and the maintenance of pregnancy. However, neuroendocrine research over the past decades has established that progesterone has multiple functions beyond reproduction. Within the nervous system, its neuromodulatory and neuroprotective effects are much studied. Although progesterone has been shown to also promote myelin repair, its influence and that of other steroids on myelination and remyelination is relatively neglected. Reasons for this are that hormonal influences are still not considered as a central problem by most myelin biologists, and that neuroendocrinologists are not sufficiently concerned with the importance of myelin in neuron functions and viability. The effects of progesterone in the nervous system involve a variety of signaling mechanisms. The identification of the classical intracellular progesterone receptors as therapeutic targets for myelin repair suggests new health benefits for synthetic progestins, specifically designed for contraceptive use and hormone replacement therapies. There are also major advantages to use natural progesterone in neuroprotective and myelin repair strategies, because progesterone is converted to biologically active metabolites in nervous tissues and interacts with multiple target proteins. The delivery of progesterone however represents a challenge because of its first-pass metabolism in digestive tract and liver. Recently, the intranasal route of progesterone administration has received attention for easy and efficient targeting of the brain. Progesterone in the brain is derived from the steroidogenic endocrine glands or from local synthesis by neural cells. Stimulating the formation of endogenous progesterone is currently explored as an alternative strategy for neuroprotection, axonal regeneration, and myelin repair.
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Chronic maternal infusion of full-length adiponectin in pregnant mice down-regulates placental amino acid transporter activity and expression and decreases fetal growth.
J. Physiol. (Lond.)
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Maternal adiponectin levels are inversely correlated to birth weight, suggesting that maternal adiponectin limits fetal growth. We hypothesized that full-length adiponectin (fADN) infusion in pregnant mice down-regulates placental amino acid transporters and decreases fetal growth. Starting at embryonic day (E) 14.5, fADN (0.62 ± 0.02 ?g (g body weight)(?1) day(?1), n = 7) or vehicle (control, n = 9) were infused in pregnant C57/BL6 mice by mini-osmotic pump. At E18.5, dams were killed and placental homogenates and trophoblast plasma membrane (TPM) vesicles were prepared. Infusion of fADN elevated maternal serum fADN by 4-fold and decreased fetal weights by 18%. Adiponectin receptor 2, but not adiponectin receptor 1, was expressed in TPM. fADN infusion decreased TPM System A (–56%, P < 0.001) and System L amino acid transporter activity (–50%, P < 0.03). TPM protein expression of SNAT1, 2 and 4 (System A amino acid transporter isoforms) and LAT1 and LAT2, but not CD98, (System L amino acid transporter isoforms) was down-regulated by fADN infusion. To identify possible mechanisms underlying these changes we determined the phosphorylation of proteins in signalling pathways known to regulate placental amino acid transporters. fADN decreased phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate-1 (Tyr-608), Akt (Thr-308 and Ser-473), S6 kinase 1 (Thr-389), eukaryotic initiation factor 4E binding protein 1 (Thr-37/46 and Thr-70) and ribosomal protein S6 (Ser-235/236) and increased the phosphorylation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor ? (PPAR?) (Ser-21) in the placenta. These data suggest that maternal adiponectin decreases fetal growth by down-regulation of placental amino acid transporters, which limits fetal nutrient availability. This effect may be mediated by inhibition of insulin/IGF-I and mTOR signalling pathways, which are positive regulators of placental amino acid transporters. We have identified a novel physiological mechanism by which the endocrine functions of maternal adipose tissue influence fetal growth.
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Gastric Sonic Hedgehog acts as a macrophage chemoattractant during the immune response to Helicobacter pylori.
Gastroenterology
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Macrophages mediate the epithelial response to Helicobacter pylori and are involved in the development of gastritis. Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) regulates gastric epithelial differentiation and function, but little is known about its immunoregulatory role in the stomach. We investigated whether gastric Shh acts as a macrophage chemoattractant during the innate immune response to H pylori infection.
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In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.