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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Incubation of methamphetamine and palatable food craving after punishment-induced abstinence.
Neuropsychopharmacology
PUBLISHED: 02-26-2014
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In a rat model of drug craving and relapse, cue-induced drug seeking progressively increases after withdrawal from methamphetamine and other drugs, a phenomenon termed 'incubation of drug craving'. However, current experimental procedures used to study incubation of drug craving do not incorporate negative consequences of drug use, which is a common factor promoting abstinence in humans. Here, we studied whether incubation of methamphetamine craving is observed after suppression of drug seeking by adverse consequences (punishment). We trained rats to self-administer methamphetamine or palatable food for 9 h per day for 14 days; reward delivery was paired with a tone-light cue. Subsequently, for one group within each reward type, 50% of the lever-presses were punished by mild footshock for 9-10 days, whereas for the other group lever-presses were not punished. Shock intensity was gradually increased over time. Next, we assessed cue-induced reward seeking in 1-h extinction sessions on withdrawal days 2 and 21. Response-contingent punishment suppressed extended-access methamphetamine or food self-administration; surprisingly, food-trained rats showed greater resistance to punishment than methamphetamine-trained rats. During the relapse tests, both punished and unpunished methamphetamine- and food-trained rats showed significantly higher cue-induced reward seeking on withdrawal day 21 than on day 2. These results demonstrate that incubation of both methamphetamine and food craving occur after punishment-induced suppression of methamphetamine or palatable food self-administration. Our procedure can be used to investigate mechanisms of relapse to drug and palatable food seeking under conditions that more closely approximate the human condition.
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Brain size varies with temperature in vertebrates.
PeerJ
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2014
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The tremendous variation in brain size among vertebrates has long been thought to be related to differences in species' metabolic rates. It is thought that species with higher metabolic rates can supply more energy to support the relatively high cost of brain tissue. And yet, while body temperature is known to be a major determinant of metabolic rate, the possible effects of temperature on brain size have scarcely been explored. Thus, here we explore the effects of temperature on brain size among diverse vertebrates (fishes, amphibians, reptiles, birds and mammals). We find that, after controlling for body size, brain size increases exponentially with temperature in much the same way as metabolic rate. These results suggest that temperature-dependent changes in aerobic capacity, which have long been known to affect physical performance, similarly affect brain size. The observed temperature-dependence of brain size may explain observed gradients in brain size among both ectotherms and endotherms across broad spatial and temporal scales.
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Enhanced upregulation of CRH mRNA expression in the nucleus accumbens of male rats after a second injection of methamphetamine given thirty days later.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2014
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Methamphetamine (METH) is a widely abused amphetamine analog. Few studies have investigated the molecular effects of METH exposure in adult animals. Herein, we determined the consequences of an injection of METH (10 mg/kg) on transcriptional effects of a second METH (2.5 mg/kg) injection given one month later. We thus measured gene expression by microarray analyses in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) of 4 groups of rats euthanized 2 hours after the second injection: saline-pretreated followed by saline-challenged (SS) or METH-challenged (SM); and METH-pretreated followed by saline-challenged (MS) or METH-challenged (MM). Microarray analyses revealed that METH (2.5 mg/kg) produced acute changes (1.8-fold; P<0.01) in the expression of 412 (352 upregulated, 60 down-regulated) transcripts including cocaine and amphetamine regulated transcript, corticotropin-releasing hormone (Crh), oxytocin (Oxt), and vasopressin (Avp) that were upregulated. Injection of METH (10 mg/kg) altered the expression of 503 (338 upregulated, 165 down-regulated) transcripts measured one month later (MS group). These genes also included Cart and Crh. The MM group showed altered expression of 766 (565 upregulated, 201 down-regulated) transcripts including Avp, Cart, and Crh. The METH-induced increased Crh expression was enhanced in the MM group in comparison to SM and MS groups. Quantitative PCR confirmed the METH-induced changes in mRNA levels. Therefore, a single injection of METH produced long-lasting changes in gene expression in the rodent NAc. The long-term increases in Crh, Cart, and Avp mRNA expression suggest that METH exposure produced prolonged activation of the endogenous stress system. The METH-induced changes in oxytocin expression also suggest the possibility that this neuropeptide might play a significant role in the neuroplastic and affiliative effects of this drug.
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Changes in Cardiac Function and Cerebral Blood Flow in Relation to Peri/Intraventricular Hemorrhage in Extremely Preterm Infants.
J. Pediatr.
PUBLISHED: 03-23-2013
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To investigate whether changes in cardiac function and cerebral blood flow (CBF) precede the occurrence of peri/intraventricular hemorrhage (P/IVH) in extremely preterm infants.
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CREB phosphorylation regulates striatal transcriptional responses in the self-administration model of methamphetamine addiction in the rat.
Neurobiol. Dis.
PUBLISHED: 03-19-2013
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Neuroplastic changes in the dorsal striatum participate in the transition from casual to habitual drug use and might play a critical role in the development of methamphetamine (METH) addiction. We examined the influence of METH self-administration on gene and protein expression that may form substrates for METH-induced neuronal plasticity in the dorsal striatum. Male Sprague-Dawley rats self-administered METH (0.1mg/kg/injection, i.v.) or received yoked saline infusions during eight 15-h sessions and were euthanized 2h, 24h, or 1month after cessation of METH exposure. Changes in gene and protein expression were assessed using microarray analysis, RT-PCR and Western blots. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) followed by PCR was used to examine epigenetic regulation of METH-induced transcription. METH self-administration caused increases in mRNA expression of the transcription factors, c-fos and fosb, the neurotrophic factor, Bdnf, and the synaptic protein, synaptophysin (Syp) in the dorsal striatum. METH also caused changes in ?FosB, BDNF and TrkB protein levels, with increases after 2 and 24h, but decreases after 1month of drug abstinence. Importantly, ChIP-PCR showed that METH self-administration caused enrichment of phosphorylated CREB (pCREB), but not of histone H3 trimethylated at lysine 4 (H3K4me3), on promoters of c-fos, fosb, Bdnf and Syp at 2h after cessation of drug intake. These findings show that METH-induced changes in gene expression are mediated, in part, by pCREB-dependent epigenetic phenomena. Thus, METH self-administration might trigger epigenetic changes that mediate alterations in expression of genes and proteins serving as substrates for addiction-related synaptic plasticity.
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Genome-wide profiling identifies a subset of methamphetamine (METH)-induced genes associated with METH-induced increased H4K5Ac binding in the rat striatum.
BMC Genomics
PUBLISHED: 02-08-2013
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METH is an illicit drug of abuse that influences gene expression in the rat striatum. Histone modifications regulate gene transcription.
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Evidence of steroid hormone activity in the chorioallantoic membrane of a Turtle (Pseudemys nelsoni).
Gen. Comp. Endocrinol.
PUBLISHED: 01-31-2013
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Endocrine properties of extraembryonic membranes have traditionally been viewed as a characteristic of placental amniotes. However, our laboratory recently demonstrated that this ability extends to the extraembryonic membranes of two oviparous amniotes (chicken and alligator) indicating that endocrine extraembryonic membranes are not an innovation of placental amniotes and suggesting that this could be a shared amniote characteristic. In this study, we test our hypothesis that the chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) obtained from non-archosaurian obligate oviparous amniotes such as turtles, have the potential for steroid hormone activity. To investigate synthesis of a major placental hormone, we performed explant culture and found that the turtle CAM synthesizes progesterone in vitro in the presence of a steroid precursor. In addition, to examine whether the CAM has the ability to respond to steroid signaling, we quantified mRNA expression of the progesterone, androgen, and two estrogen receptors. Finally, to determine if steroid receptor mRNA is translated to protein, we performed immunolocalization of the progesterone receptor. Our data demonstrate that the turtle CAM exhibits steroid synthesis and has steroid hormone signaling capabilities. To that end, steroid hormone activity has now been demonstrated in the CAMs of three oviparous species that represent three independent lineages within oviparous Reptilia that have never exhibited viviparity; thus these data support our hypothesis that endocrine activity of extraembryonic membranes is a conserved trait of Amniota.
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Methamphetamine Downregulates Striatal Glutamate Receptors via Diverse Epigenetic Mechanisms.
Biol. Psychiatry
PUBLISHED: 01-29-2013
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Chronic methamphetamine (METH) exposure causes neuroadaptations at glutamatergic synapses.
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A Method for Detecting Positive Growth Autocorrelation without Marking Individuals.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2013
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In most ecological studies, within-group variation is a nuisance that obscures patterns of interest and reduces statistical power. However, patterns of within-group variability often contain information about ecological processes. In particular, such patterns can be used to detect positive growth autocorrelation (consistent variation in growth rates among individuals in a cohort across time), even in samples of unmarked individuals. Previous methods for detecting autocorrelated growth required data from marked individuals. We propose a method that requires only estimates of within-cohort variance through time, using maximum likelihood methods to obtain point estimates and confidence intervals of the correlation parameter. We test our method on simulated data sets and determine the loss in statistical power due to the inability to identify individuals. We show how to accommodate nonlinear growth trajectories and test the effects of size-dependent mortality on our methods accuracy. The method can detect significant growth autocorrelation at moderate levels of autocorrelation with moderate-sized cohorts (for example, statistical power of 80% to detect growth autocorrelation ? (2)?=?0.5 in a cohort of 100 individuals measured on 16 occasions). We present a case study of growth in the red-eyed tree frog. Better quantification of the processes driving size variation will help ecologists improve predictions of population dynamics. This work will help researchers to detect growth autocorrelation in cases where marking is logistically infeasible or causes unacceptable decreases in the fitness of marked individuals.
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Non-linear interactions between consumers and flow determine the probability of plant community dominance on Maine rocky shores.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2013
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Although consumers can strongly influence community recovery from disturbance, few studies have explored the effects of consumer identity and density and how they may vary across abiotic gradients. On rocky shores in Maine, recent experiments suggest that recovery of plant- or animal- dominated community states is governed by rates of water movement and consumer pressure. To further elucidate the mechanisms of consumer control, we examined the species-specific and density-dependent effects of rocky shore consumers (crabs and snails) on community recovery under both high (mussel dominated) and low flow (plant dominated) conditions. By partitioning the direct impacts of predators (crabs) and grazers (snails) on community recovery across a flow gradient, we found that grazers, but not predators, are likely the primary agent of consumer control and that their impact is highly non-linear. Manipulating snail densities revealed that herbivorous and bull-dozing snails (Littorina littorea) alone can control recovery of high and low flow communities. After ?1.5 years of recovery, snail density explained a significant amount of the variation in macroalgal coverage at low flow sites and also mussel recovery at high flow sites. These density-dependent grazer effects were were both non-linear and flow-dependent, with low abundance thresholds needed to suppress plant community recovery, and much higher levels needed to control mussel bed development. Our study suggests that consumer density and identity are key in regulating both plant and animal community recovery and that physical conditions can determine the functional forms of these consumer effects.
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Integrator networks: illuminating the black box linking genotype and phenotype.
Integr. Comp. Biol.
PUBLISHED: 06-25-2011
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Emerging concepts in developmental biology, such as facilitated variation and dynamical patterning modules, address a major shortcoming of the Modern Synthesis in Biology: how genotypic variation is transduced into functional yet diverse phenotypic variation. Still, we lack a theory to explain how variation at the cellular and tissue level is coordinated into variation at the whole-organism level, especially as priority of cellular and tissue functions change over an individuals lifetime and are influenced by environmental variation. Here, we propose that interactions among a limited subset of physiological factors that we call, integrators, regulate most phenotypic variation at the organismal level. Integrators are unique among physiological factors in that they have the propensity to coordinate the expression of conserved gene modules of most types of tissues because they participate as nodes in a hierarchical network. In other words, integrator networks impose physiological epistasis, meaning that whole-organism phenotypic responses will be influenced by previous experiences, current environmental conditions, and fitness priorities as encoded by individual integrators. Below, we provide examples of how integrator networks are responsible for both profound and irreversible phenotypic changes (i.e., metamorphosis, sexual differentiation) as well as subtler, transient (e.g., pelage color, seasonal fluctuations in lymphoid and reproductive tissues) variation. The goal of this article is not to describe completely how integrator networks function, but to stimulate discussion about the role of physiology in linking genetic to phenotypic variation. To generate useful data sets for understanding integrator networks and to inform whole-organism physiology generally, we describe several useful tools including vector-field editing, response-surface regression, and experiments of life-table responses. We then close by highlighting some implications of integrator networks for conservation and biomedicine.
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Predicting predation through prey ontogeny using size-dependent functional response models.
Am. Nat.
PUBLISHED: 05-21-2011
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The functional response is a critical link between consumer and resource dynamics, describing how a consumers feeding rate varies with prey density. Functional response models often assume homogenous prey size and size-independent feeding rates. However, variation in prey size due to ontogeny and competition is ubiquitous, and predation rates are often size dependent. Thus, functional responses that ignore prey size may not effectively predict predation rates through ontogeny or in heterogeneous populations. Here, we use short-term response-surface experiments and statistical modeling to develop and test prey size-dependent functional responses for water bugs and dragonfly larvae feeding on red-eyed treefrog tadpoles. We then extend these models through simulations to predict mortality through time for growing prey. Both conventional and size-dependent functional response models predicted average overall mortality in short-term mixed-cohort experiments, but only the size-dependent models accurately captured how mortality was spread across sizes. As a result, simulations that extrapolated these results through prey ontogeny showed that differences in size-specific mortality are compounded as prey grow, causing predictions from conventional and size-dependent functional response models to diverge dramatically through time. Our results highlight the importance of incorporating prey size when modeling consumer-prey dynamics in size-structured, growing prey populations.
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Altered gene expression in pulmonary tissue of tryptophan hydroxylase-1 knockout mice: implications for pulmonary arterial hypertension.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 02-10-2011
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The use of fenfluramines can increase the risk of developing pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) in humans, but the mechanisms responsible are unresolved. A recent study reported that female mice lacking the gene for tryptophan hydroxylase-1 (Tph1(-/-) mice) were protected from PAH caused by chronic dexfenfluramine, suggesting a pivotal role for peripheral serotonin (5-HT) in the disease process. Here we tested two alternative hypotheses which might explain the lack of dexfenfluramine-induced PAH in Tph1(-/-) mice. We postulated that: 1) Tph1(-/-) mice express lower levels of pulmonary 5-HT transporter (SERT) when compared to wild-type controls, and 2) Tph1(-/-) mice display adaptive changes in the expression of non-serotonergic pulmonary genes which are implicated in PAH. SERT was measured using radioligand binding methods, whereas gene expression was measured using microarrays followed by quantitative real time PCR (qRT-PCR). Contrary to our first hypothesis, the number of pulmonary SERT sites was modestly up-regulated in female Tph1(-/-) mice. The expression of 51 distinct genes was significantly altered in the lungs of female Tph1(-/-) mice. Consistent with our second hypothesis, qRT-PCR confirmed that at least three genes implicated in the pathogenesis of PAH were markedly up-regulated: Has2, Hapln3 and Retlna. The finding that female Tph1(-/-) mice are protected from dexfenfluramine-induced PAH could be related to compensatory changes in pulmonary gene expression, in addition to reductions in peripheral 5-HT. These observations emphasize the intrinsic limitation of interpreting data from studies conducted in transgenic mice that are not fully characterized.
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Chronic methamphetamine exposure suppresses the striatal expression of members of multiple families of immediate early genes (IEGs) in the rat: normalization by an acute methamphetamine injection.
Psychopharmacology (Berl.)
PUBLISHED: 01-13-2011
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Repeated injections of cocaine cause blunted responses to acute cocaine challenge-induced increases in the expression of immediate early genes (IEGs).
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Exchange of peripherally inserted central catheters is associated with an increased risk for bloodstream infection.
Am J Perinatol
PUBLISHED: 11-16-2010
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It is not uncommon that the peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) needs to be replaced either due to blockage or migration to a peripheral position. In such circumstances, there are two methods of PICC placement: new-site insertion and exchange by using the old PICC as a guide wire. Our objective was to investigate risk of infection associated with the exchange method. In this retrospective study, data on all PICC insertions in the neonatal intensive care unit in 2004 to 2008 were obtained. In the population who needed removal of existing PICC and insertion of a new one, we compared central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI) within 1 week of insertion between the two insertion methods. Of 1148 PICC insertions reviewed, 164 (103 new-site and 61 exchange insertions) were performed after removal of a blocked/malpositioned PICC and therefore comprised the study population. The rate of CLABSI was higher in the exchange method (9.8% versus 1%, P < 0.007). After adjusting for the confounders, the odds for CLABSI within 7 days of PICC insertion was higher with the exchange method (odds ratio 25.2, 95% confidence interval: 2.17 to 292.98; P = 0.01). In infants, insertion of PICCs using the exchange method carries an increased risk of bloodstream infection.
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Methamphetamine-induced dopamine-independent alterations in striatal gene expression in the 6-hydroxydopamine hemiparkinsonian rats.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 09-23-2010
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Unilateral injections of 6-hydroxydopamine into the medial forebrain bundle are used extensively as a model of Parkinsons disease. The present experiments sought to identify genes that were affected in the dopamine (DA)-denervated striatum after 6-hydroxydopamine-induced destruction of the nigrostriatal dopaminergic pathway in the rat. We also examined whether a single injection of methamphetamine (METH) (2.5 mg/kg) known to cause changes in gene expression in the normally DA-innervated striatum could still influence striatal gene expression in the absence of DA. Unilateral injections of 6-hydroxydopamine into the medial forebrain bundle resulted in METH-induced rotational behaviors ipsilateral to the lesioned side and total striatal DA depletion on the lesioned side. This injection also caused decrease in striatal serotonin (5-HT) and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) levels. DA depletion was associated with increases in 5-HIAA/5-HT ratios that were potentiated by the METH injection. Microarray analyses revealed changes (±1.7-fold, p<0.025) in the expression of 67 genes on the lesioned side in comparison to the intact side of the saline-treated hemiparkinsonian animals. These include follistatin, neuromedin U, and tachykinin 2 which were up-regulated. METH administration caused increases in the expression of c-fos, Egr1, and Nor-1 on the intact side. On the DA-depleted side, METH administration also increased the expression of 61 genes including Pdgf-d and Cox-2. There were METH-induced changes in 16 genes that were common in the DA-innervated and DA-depleted sides. These include c-fos and Nor-1 which show greater changes on the normal DA side. Thus, the present study documents, for the first time, that METH mediated DA-independent changes in the levels of transcripts of several genes in the DA-denervated striatum. Our results also implicate 5-HT as a potential player in these METH-induced alterations in gene expression because the METH injection also caused significant increases in 5-HIAA/5-HT ratios on the DA-depleted side.
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Environmental influence on yolk steroids in American alligators (Alligator mississippiensis).
Biol. Reprod.
PUBLISHED: 07-21-2010
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The egg yolk serves as a significant source of maternally derived steroids that are available to the embryo during early development. Altered deposition of yolk steroids can change the developmental trajectory of the embryo and have long lasting or permanent consequences. Alligators from contaminated environments have shown significant reproductive and developmental dysfunction, and it is unclear if altered deposition of yolk steroids could be a contributing factor. Alligator eggs were collected from Lake Woodruff (a reference lake), Lake Apopka (a site of known agricultural contamination), and the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge (MINWR) (home of the Kennedy Space Center and a site of heavy metal contamination). The yolks of eggs at embryonic stages 12 (prior to sex determination) and 24 (post-sex determination) were evaluated for concentrations of progesterone, 17-beta estradiol, and testosterone. Yolk concentrations of progesterone were significantly lower at embryonic stage 12 in eggs from Lake Apopka and MINWR when compared to eggs from Lake Woodruff. Yolk concentrations of 17-beta estradiol were significantly lower at embryonic stage 12 in eggs from MINWR when compared to the other two sites. Reductions in yolk 17-beta estradiol concentrations from embryonic stage 12 to 24 were significantly attenuated in eggs from MINWR versus that of Lakes Woodruff and Apopka. This study suggests that altered deposition of yolk steroids, and possibly differential utilization by the embryo, could be a contributory mechanism in the reproductive and developmental abnormalities seen in alligators from contaminated locales.
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Carry-over effects of the larval environment on post-metamorphic performance in two hylid frogs.
Oecologia
PUBLISHED: 07-07-2010
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Life history theory and empirical studies suggest that large size or earlier metamorphosis are suitable proxies for increased lifetime fitness. Thus, across a gradient of larval habitat quality, individuals with similar phenotypes for these traits should exhibit similar post-metamorphic performance. Here we examine this paradigm by testing for differences in post-metamorphic growth and survival independent of metamorphic size in a temperate (spring peeper, Pseudacris crucifer) and tropical (red-eyed treefrog, Agalychnis callidryas) anuran reared under differing larval conditions. For spring peepers, increased food in the larval environment increased post-metamorphic growth efficiency more than predicted by metamorphic phenotype and led to increased mass. Similarly, red-eyed treefrogs reared at low larval density ended the experiment at a higher mass than predicted by metamorphic phenotype. These results show that larval environments can have delayed effects not captured by examining only metamorphic phenotype. These delayed effects for the larval environment link larval and juvenile life history stages and could be important in the population dynamics of organisms with complex life cycles.
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Methamphetamine preconditioning causes differential changes in striatal transcriptional responses to large doses of the drug.
Dose Response
PUBLISHED: 07-02-2010
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Methamphetamine (METH) is a toxic drug of abuse, which can cause significant decreases in the levels of monoamines in various brain regions. However, animals treated with progressively increasing doses of METH over several weeks are protected against the toxic effects of the drug. In the present study, we tested the possibility that this pattern of METH injections might be associated with transcriptional changes in the rat striatum, an area of the brain which is known to be very sensitive to METH toxicity and which is protected by METH preconditioning. We found that the presence and absence of preconditioning followed by injection of large doses of METH caused differential expression in different sets of striatal genes. Quantitative PCR confirmed METH-induced changes in some genes of interest. These include small heat shock 27 kD proteins 1 and 2 (HspB1 and HspB2), brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), and heme oxygenase-1 (Hmox-1). Our observations are consistent with previous studies which have reported that ischemic or pharmacological preconditioning can cause reprogramming of gene expression after lethal ischemic insults. These studies add to the growing literature on the effects of preconditioning on the brain transcriptome.
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Special requirements of electronic medical record systems in obstetrics and gynecology.
Obstet Gynecol
PUBLISHED: 06-23-2010
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There is growing recognition of the importance and potential benefit of information technology and electronic medical records in providing quality care for women. Incorporation of obstetrician-gynecologist-specific requirements by electronic medical record vendors is essential to achieve appropriate electronic medical record functionality for obstetrician-gynecologists. Obstetricians and gynecologists record and document patient care in ways that are unique to medicine. Current electronic medical record systems are often limited in their usefulness for the practice of obstetrics and gynecology because of the absence of obstetrician-gynecologist specialty-specific requirements and functions. The Certification Commission on Health Information Technology is currently the only federally recognized body for certification of electronic medical record systems. As Certification Commission on Health Information Technology expands the certification criteria for electronic medical records, the special requirements identified in this report will be used as a framework for developing obstetrician-gynecologist specialty-specific criteria to be incorporated into the Certification Commission on Health Information Technology endorsement for electronic medical records used by obstetrician-gynecologists.
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Dopamine D1 receptors, regulation of gene expression in the brain, and neurodegeneration.
CNS Neurol Disord Drug Targets
PUBLISHED: 01-22-2010
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Dopamine (DA), the most abundant catecholamine in the basal ganglia, participates in the regulation of motor functions and of cognitive processes such as learning and memory. Abnormalities in dopaminergic systems are thought to be the bases for some neuropsychiatric disorders including addiction, Parkinsons disease, and Schizophrenia. DA exerts its arrays of functions via stimulation of D1-like (D1 and D5) and D2-like (D2, D3, and D4) DA receptors which are located in various regions of the brain. The DA D1 and D2 receptors are very abundant in the basal ganglia where they exert their functions within separate neuronal cell types. The present paper focuses on a review of the effects of stimulation of DA D1 receptors on diverse signal transduction pathways and gene expression patterns in the brain. We also discuss the possible involvement of the DA D1 receptors in DA-mediated toxic effects observed both in vitro and in vivo. Future studies using more selective agonist and antagonist agents and the use of genetically modified animals should help to further clarify the role of these receptors in the normal physiology and in pathological events that involve DA.
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Methamphetamine self-administration is associated with persistent biochemical alterations in striatal and cortical dopaminergic terminals in the rat.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-20-2010
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Methamphetamine (meth) is an illicit psychostimulant that is abused throughout the world. Repeated passive injections of the drug given in a single day or over a few days cause significant and long-term depletion of dopamine and serotonin in the mammalian brain. Because meth self-administration may better mimic some aspects of human drug-taking behaviors, we examined to what extent this pattern of drug treatment might also result in damage to monoaminergic systems in the brain. Rats were allowed to intravenously self-administer meth (yoked control rats received vehicle) 15 hours per day for 8 days before being euthanized at either 24 hours or at 7 and 14 days after cessation of drug taking. Meth self-administration by the rats was associated with a progressive escalation of daily drug intake to 14 mg/kg per day. Animals that self-administered meth exhibited dose-dependent decreases in striatal dopamine levels during the period of observation. In addition, there were significant reductions in the levels of striatal dopamine transporter and tyrosine hydroxylase proteins. There were also significant decreases in the levels of dopamine, dopamine transporter, and tyrosine hydroxylase in the cortex. In contrast, meth self-administration caused only transient decreases in norepinephrine and serotonin levels in the two brain regions, with these values returning to normal at seven days after cessation of drug taking. Importantly, meth self-administration was associated with significant dose-dependent increases in glial fibrillary acidic protein in both striatum and cortex, with these changes being of greater magnitude in the striatum. These results suggest that meth self-administration by rats is associated with long-term biochemical changes that are reminiscent of those observed in post-mortem brain tissues of chronic meth abusers.
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Differential effects of methamphetamine and SCH23390 on the expression of members of IEG families of transcription factors in the rat striatum.
Brain Res.
PUBLISHED: 01-06-2010
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Methamphetamine (METH) is a psychostimulant that can cause long-lasting neurodegenerative effects in humans and animals. These toxic effects appear to occur, in part, via activation of dopamine (DA) D1 receptors. This paper assessed the possibility that the DA D1 receptor antagonist, SCH23390, might inhibit METH-induced changes in the expression of several members of immediate early genes (IEGs) which are known to control more delayed expression of other genes. We found that injections of METH (4x10 mg/kg, given at 2 h intervals) caused significant increases in c-fos and fra-2 expression which lasted from 30 min to 4 h. Pre-treatment with SCH23390, given 30 min before each METH injection, completely blocked METH-induced expression of c-fos, but only partially inhibited fra-2 mRNA expression. These results were confirmed by Western blot analysis which showed METH-induced changes in c-Fos protein expression that were blocked by pretreatment with SCH23390. There were also delayed METH-induced DA D1 receptor-dependent effects on fosB mRNA expression. Even though fra-1 expression was not affected by pretreatment with METH alone, the repeated injections of SCH23390 caused substantial decreases in fra-1 mRNA expression in both the presence and absence of METH. The repeated injections of METH caused no changes in the mRNAs for c-jun, junB or junD. However, there were significant increases in the phosphorylation of c-Jun protein (ser63). Phosphorylation of c-Jun occurred in a delayed fashion (16 and 24 h after the last METH injections) and was attenuated by SCH23390 pretreatment. Interestingly, SCH23390 given alone caused significant decreases in phospho-c-Jun at all time-points. The METH injections also caused delayed induction in the expression of members of the Egr family of transcription factors in a DA D1 receptor-dependent fashion. Repeated injections of SCH23390 caused substantial suppression of basal striatal egr-1 and egr-2 mRNA expression but not of that of egr-3. Both crem and arc mRNA levels were induced by METH in a SCH23390-sensitive fashion. Moreover, multiple injections of SCH23390 given alone caused marked inhibition of basal arc expression. These results show that multiple injections of METH can differentially affect the expression of several IEGs, some of which occurred in a DA D1 receptor dependent fashion. The SCH23390-mediated suppression of basal fra-1, egr-1, and egr-2 mRNA levels suggests that their basal expression in the striatum might be dependent on tonic stimulation of the DA D1 receptor.
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[Impact of artificial light on nesting in the leatherback turtle Dermochelys coriacea (Testudines: Dermochelyidae) at Cipara beach, Venezuela].
Rev. Biol. Trop.
PUBLISHED: 11-26-2009
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The number of Leatherback turtle nests and their spatial distribution was compared between years with and without artificial light, and between dark and lighted beach segments, in Cipara Beach, Paria Peninsula, Venezuela. Residents were interviewed to identify their perceptions about the impact of artificial light on sea turtles. Mean volume of sand per meter of beach was larger at La Peña, Cipara and La Remate and smaller at Varadero (p<0.001), increasing from April to June and later decreasing until August (p<0.05). Mean percentage of gravel was higher at Varadero and La Peña, and lower at La Remate and Cipara. Most interviewed people said that artificial light does not affect sea turtles. Between 2000 and 2005, 1,217 leatherback landings and 1,056 nests were observed. Successful nests increased with the years (p=0.035) as well as total nest number (p=0.015). From 2000 through 2003 there were 743 landings, 661 nests and 374 clutches. During the two years with electric light (2004-2005), there were 474 landings, 395 nests and 232 clutches. Proportion of landings with nest building decreased significantly during the years with electric light (p=0.005), but nesting success did not vary (p=0.402). No significant difference was found between landings per beach meter in dark and lighted sectors (p=0.244), between nests built (p=0.379) and in the rate of successful nesting (p=0.516). Dark and lighted sectors did not differ in the proportion of landings with nest building (p=0.067) and success rate (p=0.833).
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Methamphetamine preconditioning alters midbrain transcriptional responses to methamphetamine-induced injury in the rat striatum.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 08-07-2009
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Methamphetamine (METH) is an illicit drug which is neurotoxic to the mammalian brain. Numerous studies have revealed significant decreases in dopamine and serotonin levels in the brains of animals exposed to moderate-to-large METH doses given within short intervals of time. In contrast, repeated injections of small nontoxic doses of the drug followed by a challenge with toxic METH doses afford significant protection against monoamine depletion. The present study was undertaken to test the possibility that repeated injections of the drug might be accompanied by transcriptional changes involved in rendering the nigrostriatal dopaminergic system refractory to METH toxicity. Our results confirm that METH preconditioning can provide significant protection against METH-induced striatal dopamine depletion. In addition, the presence and absence of METH preconditioning were associated with substantial differences in the identity of the genes whose expression was affected by a toxic METH challenge. Quantitative PCR confirmed METH-induced changes in genes of interest and identified additional genes that were differentially impacted by the toxic METH challenge in the presence of METH preconditioning. These genes include small heat shock 27 kD 27 protein 2 (HspB2), thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH), brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), c-fos, and some encoding antioxidant proteins including CuZn superoxide dismutase (CuZnSOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx)-1, and heme oxygenase-1 (Hmox-1). These observations are consistent, in part, with the transcriptional alterations reported in models of lethal ischemic injuries which are preceded by ischemic or pharmacological preconditioning. Our findings suggest that multiple molecular pathways might work in tandem to protect the nigrostriatal dopaminergic pathway against the deleterious effects of the toxic psychostimulant. Further analysis of the molecular and cellular pathways regulated by these genes should help to provide some insight into the neuroadaptive potentials of the brain when repeatedly exposed to drugs of abuse.
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The random nature of genome architecture: predicting open reading frame distributions.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 05-05-2009
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A better understanding of the size and abundance of open reading frames (ORFS) in whole genomes may shed light on the factors that control genome complexity. Here we examine the statistical distributions of open reading frames (i.e. distribution of start and stop codons) in the fully sequenced genomes of 297 prokaryotes, and 14 eukaryotes.
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Methamphetamine induces dopamine D1 receptor-dependent endoplasmic reticulum stress-related molecular events in the rat striatum.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 04-17-2009
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Methamphetamine (METH) is an illicit toxic psychostimulant which is widely abused. Its toxic effects depend on the release of excessive levels of dopamine (DA) that activates striatal DA receptors. Inhibition of DA-mediated neurotransmission by the DA D1 receptor antagonist, SCH23390, protects against METH-induced neuronal apoptosis. The initial purpose of the present study was to investigate, using microarray analyses, the influence of SCH23390 on transcriptional responses in the rat striatum caused by a single METH injection at 2 and 4 hours after drug administration. We identified 545 out of a total of 22,227 genes as METH-responsive. These include genes which are involved in apoptotic pathways, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, and in transcription regulation, among others. Of these, a total of 172 genes showed SCH23390-induced inhibition of METH-mediated changes. Among these SCH23390-responsive genes were several genes that are regulated during ER stress, namely ATF3, HSP27, Hmox1, HSP40, and CHOP/Gadd153. The secondary goal of the study was to investigate the role of DA D1 receptor stimulation on the expression of genes that participate in ER stress-mediated molecular events. We thus used quantitative PCR to confirm changes in the METH-responsive ER genes identified by the microarray analyses. We also measured the expression of these genes and of ATF4, ATF6, BiP/GRP78, and of GADD34 over a more extended time course. SCH23390 attenuated or blocked METH-induced increases in the expression of the majority of these genes. Western blot analysis revealed METH-induced increases in the expression of the antioxidant protein, Hmox1, which lasted for about 24 hours after the METH injection. Additionally, METH caused DA D1 receptor-dependent transit of the Hmox1 regulator protein, Nrf2, from cytosolic into nuclear fractions where the protein exerts its regulatory functions. When taken together, these findings indicate that SCH23390 can provide protection against neuronal apoptosis by inhibiting METH-mediated DA D1 receptor-mediated ER stress in the rat striatum. Our data also suggest that METH-induced toxicity might be a useful model to dissect molecular mechanisms involved in ER stress-dependent events in the rodent brain.
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Endocrine activity of extraembryonic membranes extends beyond placental amniotes.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 03-06-2009
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During development, all amniotes (mammals, reptiles, and birds) form extraembryonic membranes, which regulate gas and water exchange, remove metabolic wastes, provide shock absorption, and transfer maternally derived nutrients. In viviparous (live-bearing) amniotes, both extraembryonic membranes and maternal uterine tissues contribute to the placenta, an endocrine organ that synthesizes, transports, and metabolizes hormones essential for development. Historically, endocrine properties of the placenta have been viewed as an innovation of placental amniotes. However, an endocrine role of extraembryonic membranes has not been investigated in oviparous (egg-laying) amniotes despite similarities in their basic structure, function, and shared evolutionary ancestry. In this study, we ask whether the oviparous chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) of chicken (Gallus gallus) has the capability to synthesize and receive signaling of progesterone, a major placental steroid hormone.
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Methamphetamine preconditioning: differential protective effects on monoaminergic systems in the rat brain.
Neurotox Res
PUBLISHED: 02-24-2009
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Pretreatment with methamphetamine (METH) can attenuate toxicity due to acute METH challenges. The majority of previous reports have focused mainly on the effects of the drug on the striatal dopaminergic system. In the present study, we used a regimen that involves gradual increases in METH administration to rats in order to mimic progressively larger doses of the drug used by some human METH addicts. We found that this METH preconditioning was associated with complete protection against dopamine depletion caused by a METH challenge (5 mg/kg x 6 injections given 1 h apart) in the striatum and cortex. In contrast, there was no preconditioning-mediated protection against METH-induced serotonin depletion in the striatum and hippocampus, with some protection being observed in the cortex. There was also no protection against METH-induced norepinephrine (NE) depletion in the hippocampus. These results indicate that, in contrast to the present dogmas, there might be differences in the mechanisms involved in METH toxicity on monoaminergic systems in the rodent brain. Thus, chronic injections of METH might activate programs that protect against dopamine toxicity without influencing drug-induced pathological changes in serotoninergic systems. Further studies will need to evaluate the cellular and molecular bases for these differential responses.
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Evaluating aggregate terrestrial impacts of road construction projects for advanced regional mitigation.
Environ Manage
PUBLISHED: 02-14-2009
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This study presents a GIS-based database framework used to assess aggregate terrestrial habitat impacts from multiple highway construction projects in California, USA. Transportation planners need such impact assessment tools to effectively address additive biological mitigation obligations. Such assessments can reduce costly delays due to protracted environmental review. This project incorporated the best available statewide natural resource data into early project planning and preliminary environmental assessments for single and multiple highway construction projects, and provides an assessment of the 10-year state-wide mitigation obligations for the California Department of Transportation. Incorporation of these assessments will facilitate early and more strategic identification of mitigation opportunities, for single-project and regional mitigation efforts. The data architecture format uses eight spatial scales: six nested watersheds, counties, and transportation planning districts, which were intersected. This resulted in 8058 map planning units statewide, which were used to summarize all subsequent analyses. Range maps and georeferenced locations of federally and state-listed plants and animals and a 55-class landcover map were spatially intersected with the planning units and the buffered spatial footprint of 967 funded projects. Projected impacts were summarized and output to the database. Queries written in the database can sum expected impacts and provide summaries by individual construction project, or by watershed, county, transportation district or highway. The data architecture allows easy incorporation of new information and results in a tool usable without GIS by a wide variety of agency biologists and planners. The data architecture format would be useful for other types of regional planning.
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Failure of ductus arteriosus closure is associated with increased mortality in preterm infants.
Pediatrics
PUBLISHED: 01-02-2009
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Because the standard of care has been to attempt to close the patent ductus arteriosus in preterm neonates, there is a paucity of information on the outcome of patients with a persistent patent ductus arteriosus. Our objective was to compare the mortality of preterm infants with and without a persistent patent ductus arteriosus.
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Prey responses to predator chemical cues: disentangling the importance of the number and biomass of prey consumed.
PLoS ONE
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To effectively balance investment in predator defenses versus other traits, organisms must accurately assess predation risk. Chemical cues caused by predation events are indicators of risk for prey in a wide variety of systems, but the relationship between how prey perceive risk in relation to the amount of prey consumed by predators is poorly understood. While per capita predation rate is often used as the metric of relative risk, studies aimed at quantifying predator-induced defenses commonly control biomass of prey consumed as the metric of risk. However, biomass consumed can change by altering either the number or size of prey consumed. In this study we determine whether phenotypic plasticity to predator chemical cues depends upon prey biomass consumed, prey number consumed, or both. We examine the growth response of red-eyed treefrog tadpoles (Agalychnis callidryas) to cues from a larval dragonfly (Anax amazili). Biomass consumed was manipulated by either increasing the number of prey while holding individual prey size constant, or by holding the number of prey constant and varying individual prey size. We address two questions. (i) Do prey reduce growth rate in response to chemical cues in a dose dependent manner? (ii) Does the magnitude of the response depend on whether prey consumption increases via number or size of prey? We find that the phenotypic response of prey is an asymptotic function of prey biomass consumed. However, the asymptotic response is higher when more prey are consumed. Our findings have important implications for evaluating past studies and how future experiments should be designed. A stronger response to predation cues generated by more individual prey deaths is consistent with models that predict prey sensitivity to per capita risk, providing a more direct link between empirical and theoretical studies which are often focused on changes in population sizes not individual biomass.
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Emergent effects of multiple predators on prey survival: the importance of depletion and the functional response.
Ecol. Lett.
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The combined effects of multiple predators often cannot be predicted from their independent effects. Emergent multiple predator effects (MPEs) include risk enhancement, where combined predators kill more prey than predicted by their individual effects, and risk reduction, where fewer prey are killed than predicted. Current methods for detecting MPEs are biased because they assume linear functional responses and/or no prey depletion. As a result, past studies overestimated the occurrence of risk enhancement for additive designs, and tended to overestimate the occurrence of risk reduction for substitutive designs. Characterising the predators functional responses and accounting for prey depletion reduces biases in detection, estimation, interpretation and generalisation of the emergent effects of predator diversity on prey survival. These findings have implications beyond MPEs and should be considered in all studies aimed at understanding how multiple factors combine when demographic rates are density dependent.
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Spatial contagion drives colonization and recruitment of frogflies on clutches of red-eyed treefrogs.
Biol. Lett.
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Spatial contagion occurs when the perceived suitability of neighbouring habitat patches is not independent. As a result, organisms may colonize less-preferred patches near preferred patches and avoid preferred patches near non-preferred patches. Spatial contagion may thus alter colonization dynamics as well as the type and frequency of post-colonization interactions. Studies have only recently documented the phenomenon of spatial contagion and begun to examine its consequences for local recruitment. Here, we test for spatial contagion in the colonization of arboreal egg clutches of red-eyed treefrogs by a frogfly and examine the consequences of contagion for fly recruitment. In laboratory choice experiments, flies oviposit almost exclusively on clutches containing dead frog eggs. In nature, however, flies often colonize intact clutches without dead eggs. Consistent with predictions of contagion-induced oviposition, we found that flies more frequently colonize intact clutches near damaged clutches and rarely colonize intact clutches near other intact clutches. Moreover, contagion appears to benefit flies. Flies survived equally well and suffered less parasitism on clutches lacking dead eggs. This study demonstrates how reward contagion can influence colonization dynamics and suggests that colonization patterns caused by contagion may have important population- and community-level consequences.
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Electronic medical records: caveats for users.
Clin Obstet Gynecol
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Electronic medical records are becoming a necessity for modern practice. The concepts needed to understand the readiness, selection, implementation, and optimization of electronic medical records are presented.
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Towards an understanding of the evolution of the chorioallantoic placenta: steroid biosynthesis and steroid hormone signaling in the chorioallantoic membrane of an oviparous reptile.
Biol. Reprod.
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Amniotes, mammals, reptiles, and birds form common extraembryonic membranes during development to perform essential functions, such as protection, nutrient transfer, gas exchange, and waste removal. Together with the maternal uterus, extraembryonic membranes of viviparous (live-bearing) amniotes develop as an endocrine placenta that synthesizes and responds to steroid hormones critical for development. The ability of these membranes to synthesize and respond to steroid hormone signaling has traditionally been considered an innovation of placental amniotes. However, our laboratory recently demonstrated that this ability extends to the chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) of an oviparous (egg-laying) amniote, the domestic chicken, and we hypothesized that steroidogenic extraembryonic membranes could be an evolutionarily conserved characteristic of all amniotes because of similarities in basic structure, function, and shared evolutionary ancestry. In this study, we examined steroid hormone synthesis and signaling in the CAM of another oviparous amniote, the American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis). We quantified mRNA expression of a steroidogenic factor involved in the regulation of steroidogenesis (NR5A1), the key steroidogenic enzymes involved in the synthesis of progestins (HSD3B1), androgens (CYP17A1), and estrogens (CYP19A1), and the receptors involved in the signaling of progestins (PR), androgens (AR), estrogens (ESR1 and ESR2), and glucocorticoids (GR). Furthermore, we performed protein immunolocalization for PR and ESR1. Collectively, our findings indicate that the alligator CAM has the capability to regulate, synthesize, and respond to steroid hormone signaling, thus, supporting our hypothesis that the extraembryonic membranes of Amniota share a unifying characteristic, that is, the ability to synthesize and respond to steroid hormones.
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The use of multiple time point dynamic positron emission tomography/computed tomography in patients with oral/head and neck cancer does not predictably identify metastatic cervical lymph nodes.
J. Oral Maxillofac. Surg.
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To determine whether the time course of 18-fluorine fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) activity in multiple consecutively obtained 18F-FDG positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) scans predictably identifies metastatic cervical adenopathy in patients with oral/head and neck cancer. It is hypothesized that the activity will increase significantly over time only in those lymph nodes harboring metastatic cancer.
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Degradation and resilience in Louisiana salt marshes after the BP-Deepwater Horizon oil spill.
Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A.
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More than 2 y have passed since the BP-Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico, yet we still have little understanding of its ecological impacts. Examining effects of this oil spill will generate much-needed insight into how shoreline habitats and the valuable ecological services they provide (e.g., shoreline protection) are affected by and recover from large-scale disturbance. Here we report on not only rapid salt-marsh recovery (high resilience) but also permanent marsh area loss after the BP-Deepwater Horizon oil spill. Field observations, experimental manipulations, and wave-propagation modeling reveal that (i) oil coverage was primarily concentrated on the seaward edge of marshes; (ii) there were thresholds of oil coverage that were associated with severity of salt-marsh damage, with heavy oiling leading to plant mortality; (iii) oil-driven plant death on the edges of these marshes more than doubled rates of shoreline erosion, further driving marsh platform loss that is likely to be permanent; and (iv) after 18 mo, marsh grasses have largely recovered into previously oiled, noneroded areas, and the elevated shoreline retreat rates observed at oiled sites have decreased to levels at reference marsh sites. This paper highlights that heavy oil coverage on the shorelines of Louisiana marshes, already experiencing elevated retreat because of intense human activities, induced a geomorphic feedback that amplified this erosion and thereby set limits to the recovery of otherwise resilient vegetation. It thus warns of the enhanced vulnerability of already degraded marshes to heavy oil coverage and provides a clear example of how multiple human-induced stressors can interact to hasten ecosystem decline.
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Electrospinning collagen and hyaluronic acid nanofiber meshes.
J Mater Sci Mater Med
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Collagen and hyaluronic acid (HA) are main components of the extracellular matrix and have been utilized in electrospinning; a technique that creates nanosized fibers for tissue scaffolds. A collagen/HA polymer solution was electrospun into a scaffold material for osteoporosis patients who have reduced bone strength. To synthesize nanofibers, a high voltage was applied to the polymer solution to draw out nanofibers that were collected on a ground plate as a uniform mesh. The meshes were then crosslinked to render them insoluble and conjugated with gold nanoparticles to promote biocompatibility. Characterization of the mesh was performed using scanning electron microscope, electron dispersive spectroscopy and fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. A WST-1 assay determined the potential biocompatibility. The results show that collagen/HA scaffolds were developed that were insoluble in aqueous solutions and promoted cellular attachment that could be used as a tissue engineered scaffold to promote cell growth.
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Methamphetamine causes differential alterations in gene expression and patterns of histone acetylation/hypoacetylation in the rat nucleus accumbens.
PLoS ONE
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Methamphetamine (METH) addiction is associated with several neuropsychiatric symptoms. Little is known about the effects of METH on gene expression and epigenetic modifications in the rat nucleus accumbens (NAC). Our study investigated the effects of a non-toxic METH injection (20 mg/kg) on gene expression, histone acetylation, and the expression of the histone acetyltransferase (HAT), ATF2, and of the histone deacetylases (HDACs), HDAC1 and HDAC2, in that structure. Microarray analyses done at 1, 8, 16 and 24 hrs after the METH injection identified METH-induced changes in the expression of genes previously implicated in the acute and longterm effects of psychostimulants, including immediate early genes and corticotropin-releasing factor (Crf). In contrast, the METH injection caused time-dependent decreases in the expression of other genes including Npas4 and cholecystokinin (Cck). Pathway analyses showed that genes with altered expression participated in behavioral performance, cell-to-cell signaling, and regulation of gene expression. PCR analyses confirmed the changes in the expression of c-fos, fosB, Crf, Cck, and Npas4 transcripts. To determine if the METH injection caused post-translational changes in histone markers, we used western blot analyses and identified METH-mediated decreases in histone H3 acetylated at lysine 9 (H3K9ac) and lysine 18 (H3K18ac) in nuclear sub-fractions. In contrast, the METH injection caused time-dependent increases in acetylated H4K5 and H4K8. The changes in histone acetylation were accompanied by decreased expression of HDAC1 but increased expression of HDAC2 protein levels. The histone acetyltransferase, ATF2, showed significant METH-induced increased in protein expression. These results suggest that METH-induced alterations in global gene expression seen in rat NAC might be related, in part, to METH-induced changes in histone acetylation secondary to changes in HAT and HDAC expression. The causal role that HATs and HDACs might play in METH-induced gene expression needs to be investigated further.
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The SMART Platform: early experience enabling substitutable applications for electronic health records.
J Am Med Inform Assoc
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The Substitutable Medical Applications, Reusable Technologies (SMART) Platforms project seeks to develop a health information technology platform with substitutable applications (apps) constructed around core services. The authors believe this is a promising approach to driving down healthcare costs, supporting standards evolution, accommodating differences in care workflow, fostering competition in the market, and accelerating innovation.
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Transitional changes in cardiac and cerebral hemodynamics in term neonates at birth.
J. Pediatr.
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To describe cardiac function, cerebral regional oxygen saturation (rSO(2)), and cerebral blood flow (CBF) that correspond to changes in arterial oxygen saturation (SaO(2)) in normal term neonates immediately after birth and after the transition.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

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We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

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In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.