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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Management of sepsis in neutropenic patients: 2014 updated guidelines from the Infectious Diseases Working Party of the German Society of Hematology and Medical Oncology (AGIHO).
Ann. Hematol.
PUBLISHED: 03-17-2014
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Sepsis is a major cause of mortality during the neutropenic phase after intensive cytotoxic therapies for malignancies. Improved management of sepsis during neutropenia may reduce the mortality of cancer therapies. Clinical guidelines on sepsis treatment have been published by others. However, optimal management may differ between neutropenic and non-neutropenic patients. Our aim is to give evidence-based recommendations for haematologist, oncologists and intensive care physicians on how to manage adult patients with neutropenia and sepsis.
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Detection of an activated JAK3 variant and a Xq26.3 microdeletion causing loss of PHF6 and miR-424 expression in myelodysplastic syndromes by combined targeted next generation sequencing and SNP array analysis.
Pathol. Res. Pract.
PUBLISHED: 02-11-2014
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Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are hematopoietic disorders characterized by ineffective hematopoiesis and progression to acute leukemia. In patients ineligible for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, azacitidine is the only treatment shown to prolong survival. However, with the availability of a growing compendium of cancer biomarkers and related drugs, analysis of relevant genetic alterations for individual MDS patients might become part of routine evaluation. Therefore and in order to cover the entire bone marrow microenvironment involved in the pathogenesis of MDS, SNP array analysis and targeted next generation sequencing (tNGS) for the mostly therapy relevant 46 onco- and tumor-suppressor genes were performed on bone marrow biopsies from 29 MDS patients. In addition to the detection of mutations known to be associated with MDS in NRAS, KRAS, MPL, NPM1, IDH1, PTPN11, APC and MET, single nucleotide variants so far unrelated to MDS in STK11 (n=1), KDR (n=3), ATM (n=1) and JAK3 (n=2) were identified. Moreover, a recurrent microdeletion was detected in Xq26.3 (n=2), causing loss of PHF6 expression, a potential tumor suppressor gene, and the miR-424, which is involved in the development of acute myeloid leukemia. Finally, combined genetic aberrations affecting the VEGF/VEGFR pathway were found in the majority of cases demonstrating the diversity of mutations affecting different nodes of a particular signaling network as an intrinsic feature in MDS patients. We conclude that combined SNP array analyses and tNGS can identify established and novel therapy relevant genomic aberrations in MDS patients and track them in a clinical setting for individual therapy selection.
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Diagnostic performance of an Aspergillus-specific nested PCR assay in cerebrospinal fluid samples of immunocompromised patients for detection of central nervous system aspergillosis.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-14-2013
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Central nervous system (CNS) invasive aspergillosis (IA) is a fatal complication in immunocompromised patients. Confirming the diagnosis is rarely accomplished as invasive procedures are impaired by neutropenia and low platelet count. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) cultures or galactomannan (GM) regularly yield negative results thus suggesting the need for improving diagnostic procedures. Therefore the performance of an established Aspergillus-specific nested polymerase chain reaction assay (PCR) in CSF samples of immunocompromised patients with suspicion of CNS IA was evaluated. We identified 113 CSF samples from 55 immunocompromised patients for whom CNS aspergillosis was suspected. Of these patients 8/55 were identified as having proven/probable CNS IA while the remaining 47 patients were classified as having either possible (n?=?22) or no CNS IA (n?=?25). PCR positivity in CSF was observed for 8/8 proven/probable, in 4/22 possible CNS IA patients and in 2/25 NoIA patients yielding sensitivity and specificity values of 1.0 (95% CI 0.68-1) and 0.93 (95% CI 0.77-0.98) and a positive likelihood ratio of 14 and negative likelihood ratio of 0.0, respectively, thus resulting in a diagnostic odds ratio of ?. The retrospective analysis of CSF samples from patients with suspected CNS IA yielded a high sensitivity of the nested PCR assay. PCR testing of CSF samples is recommended for patients for whom CNS IA is suspected, especially for those whose clinical condition does not allow invasive procedures as a positive PCR result makes the presence of CNS IA in that patient population highly likely.
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Monitoring of donor chimerism in sorted CD34+ peripheral blood cells allows the sensitive detection of imminent relapse after allogeneic stem cell transplantation.
Haematologica
PUBLISHED: 11-03-2009
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Analysis of donor chimerism is an important diagnostic tool to assess the risk of relapse after allogeneic stem cell transplantation, especially in patients lacking a specific marker suitable for monitoring of minimal residual disease. We prospectively investigated the predictive value of donor chimerism analyses in sorted CD34(+) peripheral blood cells in 90 patients with acute leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome. The cumulative incidence of relapse after four years was significantly increased in cases with decreasing or incomplete CD34(+) donor chimerism (57% vs. 18%, p=0.0001). Multivariate analysis confirmed decreasing CD34(+) donor chimerism as an independent predictor of relapse and inferior survival. The interval between a decrease of CD34(+) chimerism of less than 80% and hematologic relapse was 61 days (range 0-567). Monitoring of CD34(+) donor chimerism in the peripheral blood allows prediction of imminent relapse after allogeneic stem cell transplantation even when a disease-specific marker is lacking.
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Diagnosis and antimicrobial therapy of lung infiltrates in febrile neutropenic patients: Guidelines of the infectious diseases working party of the German Society of Haematology and Oncology.
Eur. J. Cancer
PUBLISHED: 04-27-2009
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Patients with neutropenia lasting for more than 10d, who develop fever and pulmonary infiltrates, are at risk of treatment failure under conventional broad-spectrum antibacterial therapy. Filamentous fungi are predominant causes of failure, however, multi-resistant gram-negative rods such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa or Stenotrophomonas maltophilia may be involved. Prompt addition of mould-active systemic antifungal therapy, facilitated by early thoracic computed tomography, improves clinical outcome. Non-culture-based diagnostic procedures to detect circulating antigens such as galactomannan or 1,3-beta-d-glucan, or PCR techniques to amplify circulating fungal DNA from blood, bronchoalveolar lavage or tissue specimens, may facilitate the diagnosis of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis. CT-guided bronchoalveolar lavage is useful in order to identify causative microorganisms such as multidrug-resistant bacteria, filamentous fungi or Pneumocystis jiroveci. For pre-emptive antifungal treatment, voriconazole or liposomal amphotericin B is preferred. In patients given broad-spectrum azoles for antifungal prophylaxis, non-azole antifungals or antifungal combinations might become first choice in this setting. Antifungal treatment should be continued for at least 14 d before non-response and treatment modification are considered. Microbial isolates from blood cultures, bronchoalveolar lavage or respiratory secretions must be critically interpreted with respect to their aetiological relevance for pulmonary infiltrates.
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Reduced-intensity conditioning versus standard conditioning before allogeneic haemopoietic cell transplantation in patients with acute myeloid leukaemia in first complete remission: a prospective, open-label randomised phase 3 trial.
Lancet Oncol.
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Reduced-intensity conditioning regimens have been developed to minimise early toxic effects and deaths after allogeneic haemopoietic cell transplantation. However, the efficacy of these regimens before this procedure has not been investigated in a randomised trial. In this prospective, open-label randomised phase 3 trial we compared a reduced-intensity fludarabine-based conditioning regimen with a standard regimen in patients with acute myeloid leukaemia in first complete remission.
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Therapy with antifungals decreases the diagnostic performance of PCR for diagnosing invasive aspergillosis in bronchoalveolar lavage samples of patients with haematological malignancies.
J. Antimicrob. Chemother.
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Invasive aspergillosis (IA) is a life-threatening infection in severely immunocompromised patients, especially those receiving intensive chemotherapy or undergoing haematopoietic stem cell transplantation. As the clinical diagnosis of IA is mostly based on biomarkers (galactomannan, ?-d-glucan, PCR assays) indicating Aspergillus as the underlying pathogen, the effect of antifungal treatment on the performance of these parameters is still controversial. We evaluated the effect of antifungal treatment on the performance of an Aspergillus-specific PCR assay in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) samples.
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Diagnosing pulmonary aspergillosis in patients with hematological malignancies: a multicenter prospective evaluation of an Aspergillus PCR assay and a galactomannan ELISA in bronchoalveolar lavage samples.
Eur. J. Haematol.
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Diagnosing invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA) remains a challenge in patients with hematological malignancies. The clinical significance of testing bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) samples both with polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and Aspergillus galactomannan ELISA (GM) is unclear, and the BAL cutoff for GM has not been clearly evaluated yet.
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Antimicrobial therapy of febrile complications after high-dose chemotherapy and autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation--guidelines of the Infectious Diseases Working Party (AGIHO) of the German Society of Hematology and Oncology (DGHO).
Ann. Hematol.
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More than 18,000 autolgous transplantation were performed in Europe in the year 2009. It as a routine procedure in experienced centres. Even if there is a low mortality rate, infections are a major issue after transplantation, occurring in more than 60 % of the patients. In this review we discuss all aspects of infections after autologous stem transplantation, including epidemiology, diagnostics, therapeutic algorithms, prophylaxis and supportive therapy.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.