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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Impairment of executive function in Kenyan children exposed to severe falciparum malaria with neurological involvement.
Malar. J.
PUBLISHED: 05-18-2014
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Persistent neurocognitive impairments occur in a fifth of children hospitalized with severe falciparum malaria. There is little data on the association between different neurological phenotypes of severe malaria (seizures, impaired consciousness and prostration) and impairments in executive function.
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Fosphenytoin for seizure prevention in childhood coma in Africa: a randomized clinical trial.
J Crit Care
PUBLISHED: 07-01-2013
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We conducted a double-blind trial to determine whether a single intramuscular injection of fosphenytoin prevents seizures and neurologic sequelae in children with acute coma.
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Behavioral problems in children with epilepsy in rural Kenya.
Epilepsy Behav
PUBLISHED: 08-16-2011
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The aims of this study were to record behavioral problems in children with epilepsy (CWE), compare the prevalence with that reported among healthy children without epilepsy, and investigate the risk factors. A child behavioral questionnaire for parents comprising 15 items was administered to the main caregiver of 108 CWE and 108 controls matched for age in Kilifi, Kenya. CWE had a higher mean score for reported behavioral problems than controls (6.9 vs 4.9, t=4.7, P<0.001). CWE with active epilepsy also recorded more behavioral problems than those with inactive epilepsy (8.2 vs 6.2, t=-2.9, P=0.005). A significantly greater proportion of CWE (49% vs 26% of controls) were reported to have behavioral problems. Active epilepsy, cognitive impairment, and focal seizures were the most significant independent covariates of behavioral problems. Behavioral problems in African CWE are common and need to be taken into consideration in planning comprehensive clinical services in this region.
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Atypical brain response to novelty in rural African children with a history of severe falciparum malaria.
J. Neurol. Sci.
PUBLISHED: 02-03-2010
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Plasmodium falciparum is the most common parasitic infection of the central nervous system causing neuro-cognitive deficits in 5-26% of paediatric cases. The burden cannot be reliably estimated because of lack of sensitive, culture-fair and robust assessments in rural settings. Auditory and visual brain event related potentials (ERPs) are used to compare novelty processing in children exposed to severe malaria with community controls. Fifty children previously admitted and discharged from Kilifi District Hospital with severe falciparum malaria were selected and compared with 77 unexposed age matched children. The results showed that up to 14% of children exposed to severe malaria had significantly different responses to novelty compared to unexposed children. Children exposed to severe malaria had smaller P3a amplitudes to novelty in both auditory [F (3, 119)=4.545, p=0.005] and visual [F (3, 119)=6.708, p<0.001] paradigms compared to unexposed children. In the auditory domain the differences in processing of novelty were not related to early component processing. The percentage of children with severe malaria showing impaired performance using ERPs is within the range previously reported using neuropsychological tests. The overall pattern suggests that severe malaria affects prefrontal and temporal cortices normally activated by stimulus novelty.
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Auditory and visual novelty processing in normally-developing Kenyan children.
Clin Neurophysiol
PUBLISHED: 01-18-2010
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The aim of this study was to describe the normative development of the electrophysiological response to auditory and visual novelty in children living in rural Kenya.
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Impaired everyday memory associated with encephalopathy of severe malaria: the role of seizures and hippocampal damage.
Malar. J.
PUBLISHED: 09-16-2009
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Seizures are common in children admitted with severe falciparum malaria and are associated with neuro-cognitive impairments. Prolonged febrile seizures are associated with hippocampal damage and impaired memory. It was hypothesized that severe malaria causes impaired everyday memory which may be associated with hippocampal damage.
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Cognitive deficits following exposure to pneumococcal meningitis: an event-related potential study.
BMC Infect. Dis.
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Pneumococcal meningitis (PM) is a severe and life-threatening disease that is associated with cognitive impairment including learning difficulties, cognitive slowness, short-term memory deficits and poor academic performance. There are limited data on cognitive outcomes following exposure to PM from Africa mainly due to lack of culturally appropriate tools. We report cognitive processes of exposed children as measured by auditory and visual event-related potentials.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.