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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Clinical examination and physical assessment of hip joint-related pain in athletes.
Int J Sports Phys Ther
PUBLISHED: 11-11-2014
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Evidence-based clinical examination and assessment of the athlete with hip joint related pain is complex. It requires a systematic approach to properly differentially diagnose competing potential causes of athletic pain generation. An approach with an initial broad focus (and hence use of highly sensitive tests/measures) that then is followed by utilizing more specific tests/measures to pare down this imprecise differential diagnosis list is suggested. Physical assessment measures are then suggested to discern impairments, activity and participation restrictions for athletes with hip-join related pain, hence guiding the proper treatment approach.
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The Utility of Clinical Measures for the Diagnosis of Achilles Tendon Injuries: A Systematic Review With Meta-Analysis.
J Athl Train
PUBLISHED: 09-23-2014
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Objective :? To summarize and evaluate the current diagnostic accuracy of clinical measures used to diagnose Achilles tendon injuries. Data Sources :? A literature search of MEDLINE, CINAHL, and EMBASE databases was conducted with key words related to diagnostic accuracy and Achilles tendon injuries. Study Selection :? Original research articles investigating Achilles tendon injuries against an acceptable reference standard were included. Data Extraction :? Three studies met the inclusion criteria. Quality assessment was conducted using the Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies-2 tool. DerSimonian-Laird random-effects models were used to pool sensitivity (SN), specificity (SP), and diagnostic odds ratios with their 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Data Synthesis :? The SN and negative likelihood ratio (-LR) values for Achilles tendon rupture measures ranged from 0.73 (95% CI = 0.65, 0.81) and 0.30 (95% CI = 0.23, 0.40) to 0.96 (95% CI = 0.93, 0.99) and 0.04 (95% CI = 0.02, 0.10), respectively, whereas SP and positive likelihood ratio (+LR) values ranged from 0.85 (95% CI = 0.72, 0.98) and 6.29 (95% CI = 2.33, 19.96) to 0.93 (95% CI = 0.84, 1.00) and 13.71 (95% CI = 3.54, 51.24), respectively, with the highest SN and SP both reported in the calf-squeeze test. The SN and -LR values for Achilles tendinopathy measures ranged from 0.03 (95% CI = 0.00, 0.08) and 0.97 (95% CI = not reported) to 0.89 (95% CI = 0.75, 0.98) and 0.19 (95% CI = not reported), whereas SP and +LR values ranged from 0.58 (95% CI = 0.38, 0.77) and 2.12 (95% CI = not reported) to 1.00 (95% CI = 1.00, 1.00) and infinity, respectively, with the highest SN and SP reported for morning stiffness and palpation for crepitus. Pooled analyses demonstrated similar diagnostic properties in all 3 clinical measures (arc sign, palpation, and Royal London Hospital test), with SN and -LR ranging from 0.42 (95% CI = 0.23, 0.62) and 0.68 (95% CI = 0.50, 0.93), respectively, for the arc sign, to 0.64 (95% CI = 0.44, 0.81) and 0.48 (95% CI = 0.29, 0.80), respectively, for palpation. Pooled SP and +LR ranged from 0.81 (95% CI = 0.65, 0.91) and 3.15 (95% CI = 1.61, 6.18), respectively, for palpation, to 0.88 (95% CI = 0.74, 0.96) SP for the arc sign and 3.84 (95% CI = 1.69, 8.73) +LR for the Royal London Hospital test. Conclusions :? Most clinical measures for Achilles tendon injury have greater diagnostic than screening capability.
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Eccentric training for prevention of hamstring injuries may depend on intervention compliance: a systematic review and meta-analysis.
Br J Sports Med
PUBLISHED: 09-18-2014
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Hamstring injury is a prevalent muscle injury in sports. Inconclusive evidence exists for eccentric hamstring strengthening to prevent hamstring injuries. One reason for this discrepancy may be the influence intervention non-compliance has on individual study estimates, and therefore pooled estimates.
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Sex differences in dynamic closed kinetic chain upper quarter function in collegiate swimmers.
J Athl Train
PUBLISHED: 07-11-2014
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Upper quarter injuries have a higher incidence in female swimmers; however, to date, there are few ways to assess the basic functional ability of this region. The upper quarter Y balance test (YBT-UQ) may assist in this process because it was developed to provide a fundamental assessment of dynamic upper quarter ability at the limit of stability.
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Conservative management of femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) in the long distance runner.
Phys Ther Sport
PUBLISHED: 01-15-2014
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Femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) is one cause of anterior hip pain that may occur in a long distance runner. By definition FAI is due to bony abutment of the femoral neck and the acetabulum. This occurs primarily with end-ranges of hip flexion and adduction. An understanding of running mechanics and performing a thorough examination will help the clinician provide an appropriate intervention for these athletes. A course of conservative treatment that includes patient education, manual therapy and strengthening should be tried prior to surgical management.
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Restricted hip mobility: clinical suggestions for self-mobilization and muscle re-education.
Int J Sports Phys Ther
PUBLISHED: 11-01-2013
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Restricted hip mobility has shown strong correlation with various pathologies of the hip, lumbar spine and lower extremity. Restricted mobility can consequently have deleterious effects not only at the involved joint but throughout the entire kinetic chain. Promising findings are suggesting benefit with skilled joint mobilization intervention for clients with various hip pathologies. Supervised home program intervention, while lacking specifically for the hip joint, are demonstrating promising results in other regions of the body. Application of an accompanying home program for the purpose of complementing skilled, in clinic intervention is advisable for those clients that respond favorably to such methodology.
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The efficacy of manual joint mobilisation/manipulation in treatment of lateral ankle sprains: a systematic review.
Br J Sports Med
PUBLISHED: 08-26-2013
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Lateral ankle sprains are common and can have detrimental consequences to the athlete. Joint mobilisation/manipulation may limit these outcomes.
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Examination of acetabular labral tear: a continued diagnostic challenge.
Br J Sports Med
PUBLISHED: 07-31-2013
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Acetabular labrum tears (ALT) are present in 22-55% of individuals with hip or groin pain. Tears can occur as a result of trauma or degeneration and are markedly associated with femoral acetabular morphological variations. An ALT can lead to biomechanical deficiencies and a loss of stability to the coxafemoral joint due to the labrum serving as a stabilising structure of this joint. The diagnosis of ALT is complex and multidimensional. Although tremendous improvements in diagnostic utility for ALT have occurred in the past 25 years, there are few patient history, clinical examination and special test findings that are unique to the condition. Imaging methods such as MRI, CT and ultrasonography have demonstrated reasonable accuracy, but not at a level that allows use as a stand-alone measure. Outcomes measures that focus on functional limitation or that are used to measure recovery should envelop the complexities of the condition and be captured using both self-report and physical performance measures. Only when patient history, objective testing, clinical examination special testing and imaging are combined can a clinician fully elucidate the multidimensional diagnosis of ALT.
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Diagnostic accuracy of clinical tests for assessment of hamstring injury: a systematic review.
J Orthop Sports Phys Ther
PUBLISHED: 01-14-2013
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Systematic literature review.
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Femoroacetabular impingement in a high school female athlete.
J Orthop Sports Phys Ther
PUBLISHED: 11-29-2011
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The patient was a 17-year-old female who was referred to a physical therapist by her primary-care physician with a chief complaint of bilateral hip and groin pain. The patient was treated by the physical therapist for 8 weeks, but she was unable to successfully return to playing soccer. The patient was subsequently referred to an orthopaedic surgeon, who ordered a magnetic resonance arthrogram that did not reveal intra-articular pathology. To further evaluate bony morphology, computed tomography with 3-dimensional reconstructions was ordered, which demonstrated findings consistent with cam-type femoroacetabular impingement.
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A literature review of studies evaluating gluteus maximus and gluteus medius activation during rehabilitation exercises.
Physiother Theory Pract
PUBLISHED: 10-18-2011
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Recently, clinicians have focused much attention on the importance of hip strength for the rehabilitation of not only patients with low back pain but also lower extremity pathology. Properly designing a rehabilitation program for the gluteal muscles requires careful consideration of biomechanical principles, such as length of the external moment arm, gravity, and subject positioning. Understanding the anatomy and function of these muscles also is essential. Electromyography (EMG) provides a useful means to determine muscle activation levels during specific exercises. Descriptions of specific exercises, as they relate to the gluteal muscles, are described. The specific performance of these exercises, the reliability of such EMG measures, and descriptive figures are also detailed. Of utmost importance to practicing clinicians is the interpretation of such data and how it can be best used in exercise prescription when formulating a treatment plan.
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Integration of strength and conditioning principles into a rehabilitation program.
Int J Sports Phys Ther
PUBLISHED: 09-10-2011
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Rehabilitation and strength and conditioning are often seen as two separate entities in athletic injury recovery. Traditionally an athlete progresses from the rehabilitation environment under the care of a physical therapist and/or athletic trainer to the strength and conditioning coach for specific return to sport training. These two facets of return to sport are often considered to have separate goals. Initial goals of each are often different due to the timing of their implementation encompassing different stages of post-injury recovery. The initial focus of post injury rehabilitation includes alleviation of dysfunction, enhancement of tissue healing, and provision of a systematic progression of range-of-motion and strength. During the return to function phases, specific return to play goals are paramount. Understanding of specific principles and program parameters is necessary when designing and implementing an athletes rehabilitation program. Communication and collaboration amongst all individuals caring for the athlete is a must. The purpose of this review is to outline the current evidence supporting utilization of training principles in athletic rehabilitation, as well as provide suggested implementation of such principles throughout different phases of a proposed rehabilitation program.
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The role and implementation of eccentric training in athletic rehabilitation: tendinopathy, hamstring strains, and acl reconstruction.
Int J Sports Phys Ther
PUBLISHED: 06-10-2011
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The benefits and proposed physiological mechanisms of eccentric exercise have previously been elucidated and eccentric exercise has been used for well over seventy years. Traditionally, eccentric exercise has been used as a regular component of strength training. However, in recent years, eccentric exercise has been used in rehabilitation to manage a host of conditions. Of note, there is evidence in the literature supporting eccentric exercise for the rehabilitation of tendinopathies, muscle strains, and in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rehabilitation. The purpose of this Clinical Commentary is to discuss the physiologic mechanism of eccentric exercise as well as to review the literature regarding the utilization of eccentric training during rehabilitation. A secondary purpose of this commentary is to provide the reader with a framework for the implementation of eccentric training during rehabilitation of tendinopathies, muscle strains, and after ACL reconstruction.
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Best tests/clinical findings for screening and diagnosis of patellofemoral pain syndrome: a systematic review.
Physiotherapy
PUBLISHED: 06-07-2011
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Diagnosis of patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS) is commonly performed using a myriad of clinical and imaging-based criteria.
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The effect of progressive resistance training on leg strength, aerobic capacity and functional tasks of daily living in persons with Down syndrome.
Disabil Rehabil
PUBLISHED: 03-29-2011
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The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of progressive resistance training on leg strength, aerobic capacity and physical function in persons with Down syndrome (DS).
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The assessment of function: How is it measured? A clinical perspective.
J Man Manip Ther
PUBLISHED: 03-07-2011
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Testing for outcome or performance can take many forms; including multiple iterations of self-reported measures of function (an assessment of the individuals perceived dysfunction) and/or clinical special tests (which are primarily assessments of impairments). Typically absent within these testing mechanisms is whether or not one can perform a specific task associated with function. The paper will operationally define function, discuss the construct of function within the disablement model, will overview the multi-dimensional nature of function as a concept, will examine the current evidence for functional testing methods, and will propose a functional testing continuum. Limitations of functional performance testing will be discussed including recommendations for future research.
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Performance enhancement in the terminal phases of rehabilitation.
Sports Health
PUBLISHED: 02-11-2011
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There is a dearth of literature on the performance enhancement in the recovering athlete in the terminal phases of rehabilitation. There are established training methods that target strength, power, speed, endurance, and metabolic capacity that all lead to performance enhancement.
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Lumbo-pelvic-hip complex pain in a competitive basketball player: a case study.
Sports Health
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2011
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Establishing the cause of lumbo-pelvic-hip complex pain is a challenge for many clinicians. This case report describes the mechanism of injury, diagnostic process, surgical management, and rehabilitation of a female high school basketball athlete who sustained an injury when falling on her right side. Diagnostics included clinical examination, radiography of the spine and hip joint, magnetic resonance imaging arthrogram, 3-dimensional computed tomography scan, and computed tomography of the hip joint. A systematic multidisciplinary clinical approach resulted in the patients return to previous functional levels.
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Effects of dynamic warm-up with and without a weighted vest on lower extremity power performance of high school male athletes.
J Strength Cond Res
PUBLISHED: 11-20-2010
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This study examined lower extremity power performance, using the Margaria-Kalamen Power Test, after a dynamic warm-up with (resisted) and without (nonresisted) a weighted vest. Sixteen (n = 16) high school male football players, ages 14-18 years, participated in 2 randomly ordered testing sessions. One session involved performing the teams standard dynamic warm-up while wearing a vest weighted at 5% of the individual athletes body weight before performing 3 trials of the Margaria-Kalamen Power Test. The second session involved performing the same dynamic warm-up without wearing a weighted vest before performing 3 trials of the Margaria-Kalamen Power Test. The warm-up performed by the athletes consisted of various lower extremity dynamic movements over a 5-minute period. No significant difference was found in power performance between the resisted and nonresisted dynamic warm-up protocols (p > 0.05). The use of a dynamic warm-up with a vest weighted at 5% of the athletes body weight was not advantageous for increasing lower extremity power output in this study. The results of this study suggest that resisted dynamic warm-up protocols may not augment the production of power performance in high school football players.
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Periodization: current review and suggested implementation for athletic rehabilitation.
Sports Health
PUBLISHED: 11-01-2010
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Clinicians are constantly faced with the challenge of designing training programs for injured and noninjured athletes that maximize healing and optimize performance. Periodization is a concept of systematic progression-that is, resistance training programs that follow predictable patterns of change in training variables. The strength training literature is abundant with studies comparing periodization schemes on uninjured, trained, and untrained athletes. The rehabilitation literature, however, is scarce with information about how to optimally design resistance training programs based on periodization principles for injured athletes. The purpose of this review is to discuss relevant training variables and methods of periodization, as well as periodization program outcomes. A secondary purpose is to provide an anecdotal framework regarding implementation of periodization principles into rehabilitation programs.
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A randomized controlled single-blinded comparison of stretching versus stretching and joint mobilization for posterior shoulder tightness measured by internal rotation motion loss.
Sports Health
PUBLISHED: 03-01-2010
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Posterior shoulder tightness, as demonstrated by limited internal rotation range of motion, is a suggested factor in many shoulder pathologies. Methods to increase posterior shoulder mobility may be beneficial.
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Reliability of alternative trunk endurance testing procedures using clinician stabilization vs. traditional methods.
J Strength Cond Res
PUBLISHED: 02-11-2010
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The purpose of this study was to determine if a modified (MOD) testing method for previously established trunk endurance testing for flexion and extension is a reliable alternative. Fifty subjects were tested with the standard (ST) testing procedure and an MOD testing procedure on separate testing occasions 1 week apart. The testing procedure order and method of assessments were randomly selected and implemented. The MOD testing procedure used a clinician to provide stabilization as opposed to the ST method of belt stabilization. Interrater reliability for MOD procedures was 0.97 for extension and 0.93 for flexion. Correlation of the MOD procedure to the ST procedure was found to be 0.90 and 0.84 for extension and flexion, respectively. From this testing, it can be concluded in a sample of normal college-aged subjects that an MOD testing method for trunk flexion and extension endurance can reliably be used as compared with the previously accepted ST testing methods. From a practical application standpoint, this allows the use of an MOD testing procedure to be implemented in athletic training rooms and weight rooms that may not have appropriate tables for the ST testing and the fact that the MOD testing procedure will most likely require less time commitment and greater efficiency with testing of large groups of subjects.
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Hip functions influence on knee dysfunction: a proximal link to a distal problem.
J Sport Rehabil
PUBLISHED: 03-27-2009
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The purpose of this commentary is to describe the multifactorial relationships between hip-joint strength, range of motion, kinetics/kinematics, and various knee pathologies, specifically as they relate across an individuals life span. Understanding the interdependence between the hip and knee joints in respect to functional activity is a necessary and relevant aspect for clinicians to investigate to ameliorate various pathological presentations at the knee that might have a proximal relationship.
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The hips influence on low back pain: a distal link to a proximal problem.
J Sport Rehabil
PUBLISHED: 03-27-2009
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Low back pain (LBP) is a multifactorial dysfunction, with one of the potential contributing factors being the hip joint. Currently, research investigating the examination and conservative treatment of LBP has focused primarily on the lumbar spine. The objective of this clinical commentary is to discuss the potential link between hip impairments and LBP using current best evidence and the concept of regional interdependence as tools to guide decision making and offer ideas for future research.
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The assessment of function. Part II: clinical perspective of a javelin thrower with low back and groin pain.
J Man Manip Ther
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Assessment of an individuals functional ability can be complex. This assessment should also be individualized and adaptable to changes in functional status. In the first article of this series, we operationally defined function, discussed the construct of function, examined the evidence as it relates to assessment methods of various aspects of function, and explored the multi-dimensional nature of the concept of function. In this case report, we aim to demonstrate the utilization of a multi-dimensional assessment method (functional performance testing) as it relates to a high-level athlete presenting with pain in the low back and groin. It is our intent to demonstrate how the clinician should continually adapt their assessment dependent on the current functional abilities of the patients.
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A suggested model for physical examination and conservative treatment of athletic pubalgia.
Phys Ther Sport
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Athletic pubalgia (AP) is a chronic debilitating syndrome that affects many athletes. As a syndrome, AP is difficult to diagnose both with clinical examination and imaging. AP is also a challenge for conservative intervention with randomized controlled trials showing mixed success rates. In other syndromes where clinical diagnosis and conservative treatment have been less than clear, a paradigm has been suggested as a framework for clinical decision making.
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Comparison of different trunk endurance testing methods in college-aged individuals.
Int J Sports Phys Ther
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Determine the reliability of two different modified (MOD1 and MOD2) testing methods compared to a standard method (ST) for testing trunk flexion and extension endurance.
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Lower extremity kinematics in running athletes with and without a history of medial shin pain.
Int J Sports Phys Ther
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Medial shin pain (MSP) is a common complaint that may stop an athlete from running. No previous study has identified deficits in pelvic, hip or knee motion as potential contributing factors to MSP. The purpose of this study was to investigate the differences in kinematics during running between uninjured athletes and those with MSP. Secondary analyses investigated differences in limbs between groups and differences between sexes.
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Diagnostic accuracy of clinical tests of the hip: a systematic review with meta-analysis.
Br J Sports Med
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Hip Physical Examination (HPE) tests have long been used to diagnose a myriad of intra-and extra-articular pathologies of the hip joint. Useful clinical utility is necessary to support diagnostic imaging and subsequent surgical decision making.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

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We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.