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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Detailed characterization of T cell responses to herpes simplex virus-2 in immune seronegative persons.
J. Immunol.
PUBLISHED: 02-17-2010
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In 2003, we described a small cohort of subjects (n = 6) who possessed no detectable serum Abs to HSV-1 or HSV-2 and no clinical or virological evidence of mucosal HSV infection yet possessed consistently detectable HSV-specific T cell responses measured primarily by lymphoproliferative (LP) and CTL assays to whole HSV-2 Ag. We termed these persons immune seronegative (IS). This report characterizes the T cell responses in 22 IS subjects largely recruited from studies of HSV-seronegative subjects in ongoing sexual relationships with HSV-2-seropositive (HSV-2(+)) partners using pools of overlapping peptides spanning 16 immuno-prevalent HSV-2 proteins. Overall, 77% of IS subjects had HSV-specific LP responses, 85% had IFN-gamma ELISPOT responses to at least one HSV-2 peptide pool, and 55% had both LP and IFN-gamma ELISPOT responses. In some cases, IFN-gamma ELISPOT responses were in excess of 500 spot-forming cells per 10(6) PBMCs and persisted for over 5 y. Although HSV-2(+) subjects (n = 40) had frequent responses to glycoproteins and tegument and immediate-early (IE) proteins of HSV-2, T cell responses in IS subjects were directed primarily at UL39 and the IE proteins ICP4 and ICP0. These data suggest that the antigenic repertoire of T cells in IS subjects is skewed compared with that of HSV-2(+) subjects and that IS subjects had more frequent T cell responses to IE proteins and infrequent T cell responses to virion components. Understanding the mechanism(s) by which such responses are elicited may provide important insights in developing novel strategies for preventing acquisition of sexually acquired HSV-2.
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Persistence of HIV-1 receptor-positive cells after HSV-2 reactivation is a potential mechanism for increased HIV-1 acquisition.
Nat. Med.
PUBLISHED: 01-07-2009
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To explore the mechanism by which herpes simplex virus (HSV)-2 infection is related to HIV-1 acquisition, we conducted in situ analysis of the cellular infiltrate from sequential biopsies of HSV-2 lesions from patients on and off antiviral therapy. CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells and a mixed population of plasmacytoid and myeloid dendritic cells (DCs), including cells expressing the C-type lectin receptor DC-SIGN, persisted at sites of HSV-2 reactivation for months after healing, even with daily antiviral therapy. The CD4(+) T cells that persisted reacted to HSV-2 antigen, were enriched for expression of the chemokine receptor CCR5, and were contiguous to DCs expressing the interleukin-3 receptor CD123 or DC-SIGN. Ex vivo infection with a CCR5-tropic strain of HIV-1 revealed greater concentrations of integrated HIV-1 DNA in cells derived from healed genital lesion biopsies than in cells from control skin biopsies. The persistence and enrichment of HIV receptor-positive inflammatory cells in the genitalia help explain the inability of anti-HSV-2 therapy to reduce HIV acquisition.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.