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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
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Intramuscular administration of a VEGF zinc finger transcription factor activator (VEGF-ZFP-TF) improves functional outcomes in SOD1 rats.
Amyotroph Lateral Scler
PUBLISHED: 08-24-2011
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Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is characterized by motor neuron loss leading to paralysis and death. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) has angiogenic, neurotrophic, and neuroprotective properties, and has preserved neuromuscular function and protected motor neurons in rats engineered to overexpress the human gene coding the mutated G93A form of the superoxide dismutase-1 (SOD1). We assessed the effects of intramuscular administration of a plasmid that encodes a zinc finger protein transcription factor (ZFP-TF) engineered to induce VEGF expression in the SOD1 rat model of ALS. Weekly injections of the plasmid preserved ipsilateral hindlimb grip strength and markedly improved rotarod performance in SOD1 rats compared to the vehicle-treated group. The number of motor neurons and the proportion of innervated neuromuscular junctions were similar in both groups. In conclusion, our data suggest that administration of the VEGF-ZFP-TF may be neuroprotective and has potential as a safe and practical approach for the management of motor disability in ALS.
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Assessment of hippocampal adeno-associated viral vector gene delivery via frameless stereotaxis in a nonhuman primate.
Stereotact Funct Neurosurg
PUBLISHED: 04-07-2011
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Expression of the neuropeptide galanin in hippocampal neurons reduces seizures in the kainic acid rodent model of epilepsy. In order to translate these findings into a human clinical trial, the safety and feasibility of hippocampal adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector expression must be demonstrated in a nonhuman primate model.
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Ultrastructural localization and function of dopamine D1-like receptors in the substantia nigra pars reticulata and the internal segment of the globus pallidus of parkinsonian monkeys.
Eur. J. Neurosci.
PUBLISHED: 04-09-2010
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The motor symptoms of Parkinsons disease (PD) are commonly attributed to striatal dopamine loss, but reduced dopamine innervation of basal ganglia output nuclei, the internal globus pallidus (GPi) and the substantia nigra pars reticulata (SNr) may also contribute to symptoms and signs of PD. Both structures express dopamine D1 and D5 receptors under normal conditions, and we have recently demonstrated that their local activation reduces neuronal discharge rates and enhances bursts and oscillatory activity in both nuclei of normal monkeys [M.A. Kliem et al. (2007)J. Neurophysiol., 89, 1489-1500]. Here, we determined the ultrastructural localization and function of D1-like receptors in 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-treated parkinsonian monkeys. In both normal and MPTP-treated monkeys, most of the D1 and D5 receptor immunoreactivity was associated with unmyelinated axons, but we also found significant postsynaptic D5 receptor immunostaining in dendrites of GPi and SNr neurons. A significant proportion of axonal D1 immunostaining was bound to the plasma membrane in both normal and MPTP-treated monkeys. Local microinjections of the D1/D5 receptor agonist SKF82958 significantly reduced discharge rates in GPi and SNr neurons, while they increased burst firing and oscillatory activity in the 3-15-Hz band in SNr, but not in GPi, of parkinsonian monkeys. Together with our recent findings from normal monkeys, these data provide evidence that functional D1/D5 receptors are expressed in GPi and SNr in both normal and parkinsonian states, and that their activation by endogenous dopamine (under normal conditions) or dopamine receptor agonists (in parkinsonism) may regulate basal ganglia outflow.
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Comparative Ultrastructural Analysis of D1 and D5 Dopamine Receptor Distribution in the Substantia Nigra and Globus Pallidus of Monkeys.
Adv Behav Biol
PUBLISHED: 09-15-2009
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Dopamine acts through the D1-like (D1, D5) and D2-like (D2, D3, D4) receptor families. Various studies have shown a preponderance of presynaptic dopamine D1 receptors on axons and terminals in the internal globus pallidus (GPi) and substantia nigra reticulata (SNr), but little is known about D5 receptors distribution in these brain regions. In order to further characterize the potential targets whereby dopamine could mediate its effects in basal ganglia output nuclei, we undertook a comparative electron microscopic analysis of D1 and D5 receptors immunoreactivity in the GPi and SNr of rhesus monkeys. At the light microscopic level, D1 receptor labeling was confined to small punctate elements, while D5 receptor immunoreactivity was predominantly expressed in cellular and dendritic processes throughout the SNr and GPi. At the electron microscopic level, 90% of D1 receptor labeling was found in unmyelinated axons or putative GABAergic terminals in both basal ganglia output nuclei. In contrast, D5 receptor labeling showed a different pattern of distribution. Although the majority (65-75%) of D5 receptor immunoreactivity was also found in unmyelinated axons and terminals in GPi and SNr, significant D5 receptor immunolabeling was also located in dendritic and glial processes. Immunogold studies showed that about 50% of D1 receptor immunoreactivity in axons was bound to the plasma membrane providing functional sites for D1 receptor-mediated effects on transmitter release in GPi and SNr. These findings provide evidence for the existence of extrastriatal pre- and post-synaptic targets through which dopamine and drugs acting at D1-like receptors may regulate basal ganglia outflow and possibly exert some of their anti-parkinsonian effects.
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A conditioning lesion provides selective protection in a rat model of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 05-07-2009
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Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) is neurodegenerative disease characterized by muscle weakness and atrophy due to progressive motoneuron loss. The death of motoneuron is preceded by the failure of neuromuscular junctions (NMJs) and axonal retraction. Thus, to develop an effective ALS therapy you must simultaneously preserve motoneuron somas, motor axons and NMJs. A conditioning lesion has the potential to accomplish this since it has been shown to enhance neuronal survival and recovery from trauma in a variety of contexts.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.