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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Hydraphile synthetic ion channels alter root architecture in Arabidopsis thaliana.
Chem. Commun. (Camb.)
PUBLISHED: 08-20-2014
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The presence of low concentrations of hydraphile synthetic amphiphiles have been found to dramatically alter the primary/lateral root architectural balance in the A. thaliana plant model system and a correlation to ion transport by the hydraphiles is consistent with the effects.
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Enhancement of antimicrobial activity by synthetic ion channel synergy.
Chem. Commun. (Camb.)
PUBLISHED: 10-08-2010
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Hydraphile synthetic ion channels were found to enhance the cytotoxicity to E. coli and B. subtilis of erythromycin, kanamycin, rifampicin, and tetracycline when co-administered with the antibiotic at sublethal concentrations of channel.
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Genomic comparison of Escherichia coli O104:H4 isolates from 2009 and 2011 reveals plasmid, and prophage heterogeneity, including shiga toxin encoding phage stx2.
PLoS ONE
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In May of 2011, an enteroaggregative Escherichia coli O104:H4 strain that had acquired a Shiga toxin 2-converting phage caused a large outbreak of bloody diarrhea in Europe which was notable for its high prevalence of hemolytic uremic syndrome cases. Several studies have described the genomic inventory and phylogenies of strains associated with the outbreak and a collection of historical E. coli O104:H4 isolates using draft genome assemblies. We present the complete, closed genome sequences of an isolate from the 2011 outbreak (2011C-3493) and two isolates from cases of bloody diarrhea that occurred in the Republic of Georgia in 2009 (2009EL-2050 and 2009EL-2071). Comparative genome analysis indicates that, while the Georgian strains are the nearest neighbors to the 2011 outbreak isolates sequenced to date, structural and nucleotide-level differences are evident in the Stx2 phage genomes, the mer/tet antibiotic resistance island, and in the prophage and plasmid profiles of the strains, including a previously undescribed plasmid with homology to the pMT virulence plasmid of Yersinia pestis. In addition, multiphenotype analysis showed that 2009EL-2071 possessed higher resistance to polymyxin and membrane-disrupting agents. Finally, we show evidence by electron microscopy of the presence of a common phage morphotype among the European and Georgian strains and a second phage morphotype among the Georgian strains. The presence of at least two stx2 phage genotypes in host genetic backgrounds that may derive from a recent common ancestor of the 2011 outbreak isolates indicates that the emergence of stx2 phage-containing E. coli O104:H4 strains probably occurred more than once, or that the current outbreak isolates may be the result of a recent transfer of a new stx2 phage element into a pre-existing stx2-positive genetic background.
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Anion complexation and transport by isophthalamide and dipicolinamide derivatives: DNA plasmid transformation in E. coli.
J. Am. Chem. Soc.
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Tris-arenes based on either isophthalic acid or 2,6-dipicolinic acid have been known for more than a decade to bind anions. Recent studies have also demonstrated their ability to transport various ions through membranes. In this report, we demonstrate two important properties of these simple diamides. First, they transport plasmid DNA into Escherichia coli about 2-fold over controls, where the ampicillin resistance gene is expressed in the bacteria. These studies were done with plasmid DNA (~2.6 kilobase (kb)) in JM109 E. coli cells. Second, known methods do not typically transport large plasmids (>15 kb). We demonstrate here that transformation of large pVIB plasmids (i.e., >20 kb) were enhanced over water controls by ~10-fold. These results are in striking contrast to the normal decrease in transformation with increasing plasmid size.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.