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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
PCSK9 is a critical regulator of the innate immune response and septic shock outcome.
Sci Transl Med
PUBLISHED: 10-17-2014
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A decrease in the activity of proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) increases the amount of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptors on liver cells and, therefore, LDL clearance. The clearance of lipids from pathogens is related to endogenous lipid clearance; thus, PCSK9 may also regulate removal of pathogen lipids such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Compared to controls, Pcsk9 knockout mice displayed decreases in inflammatory cytokine production and in other physiological responses to LPS. In human liver cells, PCSK9 inhibited LPS uptake, a necessary step in systemic clearance and detoxification. Pharmacological inhibition of PCSK9 improved survival and inflammation in murine polymicrobial peritonitis. Human PCSK9 loss-of-function genetic variants were associated with improved survival in septic shock patients and a decrease in inflammatory cytokine response both in septic shock patients and in healthy volunteers after LPS administration. The PCSK9 effect was abrogated in LDL receptor (LDLR) knockout mice and in humans who are homozygous for an LDLR variant that is resistant to PCSK9. Together, our results show that reduced PCSK9 function is associated with increased pathogen lipid clearance via the LDLR, a decreased inflammatory response, and improved septic shock outcome.
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Translational studies of A20 in atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease.
Adv. Exp. Med. Biol.
PUBLISHED: 10-11-2014
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Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the biggest killer in the Western World despite significant advances in understanding its molecular underpinnings. Chronic inflammation, the classical hallmark of atherogenesis is thought to play a key pathogenic role in the development of atherosclerotic lesions from initiation of fatty streaks to plaque rupture. Over-representation of mostly pro-inflammatory nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kappaB) target genes within atherosclerotic lesions has led to the common-held belief that excessive NF-kappaB activity promotes and aggravates atherogenesis. However, mouse models lacking various proteins involved in NF-kappaB signaling have often resulted in conflicting findings, fueling additional investigations to uncover the molecular involvement of NF-kappaB and its target genes in atherogenesis. In this chapter we will review the role of the NF-kappaB-regulated, yet potent NF-kappaB inhibitory and anti-inflammatory gene A20/TNFAIP3 in atherogenesis, and highlight the potential use of its atheroprotective properties for the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular diseases.
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Association of exome sequences with plasma C-reactive protein levels in >9000 participants.
Hum. Mol. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 09-03-2014
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C-reactive protein (CRP) concentration is a heritable systemic marker of inflammation that is associated with cardiovascular disease risk. Genome-wide association studies have identified CRP-associated common variants associated in ?25 genes. Our aims were to apply exome sequencing to (1) assess whether the candidate loci contain rare coding variants associated with CRP levels and (2) perform an exome-wide search for rare variants in novel genes associated with CRP levels. We exome-sequenced 6050 European-Americans (EAs) and 3109 African-Americans (AAs) from the NHLBI-ESP and the CHARGE consortia, and performed association tests of sequence data with measured CRP levels. In single-variant tests across candidate loci, a novel rare (minor allele frequency = 0.16%) CRP-coding variant (rs77832441-A; p.Thr59Met) was associated with 53% lower mean CRP levels (P = 2.9 × 10(-6)). We replicated the association of rs77832441 in an exome array analysis of 11 414 EAs (P = 3.0 × 10(-15)). Despite a strong effect on CRP levels, rs77832441 was not associated with inflammation-related phenotypes including coronary heart disease. We also found evidence for an AA-specific association of APOE-?2 rs7214 with higher CRP levels. At the exome-wide significance level (P < 5.0 × 10(-8)), we confirmed associations for reported common variants of HNF1A, CRP, IL6R and TOMM40-APOE. In gene-based tests, a burden of rare/lower frequency variation in CRP in EAs (P ? 6.8 × 10(-4)) and in retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptor ? (RORA) in AAs (P = 1.7 × 10(-3)) were associated with CRP levels at the candidate gene level (P < 2.0 × 10(-3)). This inquiry did not elucidate novel genes, but instead demonstrated that variants distributed across the allele frequency spectrum within candidate genes contribute to CRP levels.
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A functional synonymous coding variant in the IL1RN gene is associated with survival in septic shock.
Am. J. Respir. Crit. Care Med.
PUBLISHED: 08-05-2014
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Death from infection is a highly heritable trait, yet there are few genetic variants with known mechanism influencing survival during septic shock.
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Very low density lipoprotein cholesterol associates with coronary artery calcification in type 2 diabetes beyond circulating levels of triglycerides.
Atherosclerosis
PUBLISHED: 07-22-2014
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While recent genomic studies have focused attention on triglyceride (TG) rich lipoproteins in cardiovascular disease (CVD), little is known of very low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (VLDL-C) relationship with atherosclerosis and CVD. We examined, in a high-risk type-2 diabetic population, the association of plasma VLDL-C with coronary artery calcification (CAC).
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Distribution and medical impact of loss-of-function variants in the Finnish founder population.
PLoS Genet.
PUBLISHED: 07-01-2014
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Exome sequencing studies in complex diseases are challenged by the allelic heterogeneity, large number and modest effect sizes of associated variants on disease risk and the presence of large numbers of neutral variants, even in phenotypically relevant genes. Isolated populations with recent bottlenecks offer advantages for studying rare variants in complex diseases as they have deleterious variants that are present at higher frequencies as well as a substantial reduction in rare neutral variation. To explore the potential of the Finnish founder population for studying low-frequency (0.5-5%) variants in complex diseases, we compared exome sequence data on 3,000 Finns to the same number of non-Finnish Europeans and discovered that, despite having fewer variable sites overall, the average Finn has more low-frequency loss-of-function variants and complete gene knockouts. We then used several well-characterized Finnish population cohorts to study the phenotypic effects of 83 enriched loss-of-function variants across 60 phenotypes in 36,262 Finns. Using a deep set of quantitative traits collected on these cohorts, we show 5 associations (p<5×10??) including splice variants in LPA that lowered plasma lipoprotein(a) levels (P?=?1.5×10?¹¹?). Through accessing the national medical records of these participants, we evaluate the LPA finding via Mendelian randomization and confirm that these splice variants confer protection from cardiovascular disease (OR?=?0.84, P?=?3×10??), demonstrating for the first time the correlation between very low levels of LPA in humans with potential therapeutic implications for cardiovascular diseases. More generally, this study articulates substantial advantages for studying the role of rare variation in complex phenotypes in founder populations like the Finns and by combining a unique population genetic history with data from large population cohorts and centralized research access to National Health Registers.
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Integrative genomics reveals novel molecular pathways and gene networks for coronary artery disease.
PLoS Genet.
PUBLISHED: 07-01-2014
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The majority of the heritability of coronary artery disease (CAD) remains unexplained, despite recent successes of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in identifying novel susceptibility loci. Integrating functional genomic data from a variety of sources with a large-scale meta-analysis of CAD GWAS may facilitate the identification of novel biological processes and genes involved in CAD, as well as clarify the causal relationships of established processes. Towards this end, we integrated 14 GWAS from the CARDIoGRAM Consortium and two additional GWAS from the Ottawa Heart Institute (25,491 cases and 66,819 controls) with 1) genetics of gene expression studies of CAD-relevant tissues in humans, 2) metabolic and signaling pathways from public databases, and 3) data-driven, tissue-specific gene networks from a multitude of human and mouse experiments. We not only detected CAD-associated gene networks of lipid metabolism, coagulation, immunity, and additional networks with no clear functional annotation, but also revealed key driver genes for each CAD network based on the topology of the gene regulatory networks. In particular, we found a gene network involved in antigen processing to be strongly associated with CAD. The key driver genes of this network included glyoxalase I (GLO1) and peptidylprolyl isomerase I (PPIL1), which we verified as regulatory by siRNA experiments in human aortic endothelial cells. Our results suggest genetic influences on a diverse set of both known and novel biological processes that contribute to CAD risk. The key driver genes for these networks highlight potential novel targets for further mechanistic studies and therapeutic interventions.
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Computed tomography-defined abdominal adiposity is associated with acute kidney injury in critically ill trauma patients*.
Crit. Care Med.
PUBLISHED: 04-30-2014
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Higher body mass index is associated with increased risk of acute kidney injury after major trauma. Since body mass index is nonspecific, reflecting lean, fluid, and adipose mass, we evaluated the use of CT to determine if abdominal adiposity underlies the body mass index-acute kidney injury association.
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Insulin sensitivity index in type 1 diabetes and following human islet transplantation: comparison of the minimal model to euglycemic clamp measures.
Am. J. Physiol. Endocrinol. Metab.
PUBLISHED: 04-01-2014
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Insulin sensitivity is impaired in type 1 diabetes (T1D) and may be enhanced by islet transplantation, an effect best explained by improved metabolic control. While the minimal model index of insulin sensitivity, SI, has been used in studies of T1D, it has not before been evaluated against gold-standard measures derived from the euglycemic clamp. We sought to determine how well minimal model SI derived from an insulin-modified frequently sampled intravenous glucose tolerance (FSIGT) test compared with total body and peripheral insulin sensitivity estimates derived from the hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp in subjects with T1D and following islet transplantation. Twenty-one T1D subjects were evaluated, including a subgroup (n = 12) studied again after intrahepatic islet transplantation, with results compared with normal controls (n = 11 for the FSIGT). The transplant recipients received 9,648 ± 666 islet equivalents/kg with reduction in HbA1c from 7.1 ± 0.2 to 5.5 ± 0.1% (P < 0.01) and 10/12 were insulin independent. FSIGT-derived SI was reduced in T1D pre- compared with posttransplant and with normal [1.76 ± 0.45 vs. 4.21 ± 0.34 vs. 4.45 ± 0.81 × 10(-4)(?U/ml)(-1)·min(-1); P < 0.01 for both]. Similarly, clamp-derived total body, and by the isotopic dilution method with [6,6-(2)H2]glucose, peripheral insulin sensitivity increased in T1D from pre- to posttransplant (P < 0.05 for both). The predictive power (r(2)) between volume-corrected SIC and measures of total and peripheral insulin sensitivity was 0.66 and 0.70, respectively (P < 0.00001 for both). That the minimal model SIC is highly correlated to the clamp-derived measures indicates that the FSIGT is an appropriate methodology for the determination of insulin sensitivity in T1D and following islet transplantation.
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Differential association of plasma angiopoietin-like proteins 3 and 4 with lipid and metabolic traits.
Arterioscler. Thromb. Vasc. Biol.
PUBLISHED: 03-13-2014
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Angiopoietin-like protein 3 (ANGPTL3) and 4 (ANGPTL4) are secreted proteins that inhibit lipoprotein lipase in vitro. Genetic variants at the ANGPTL3 and ANGPTL4 gene loci are significantly associated with plasma lipid traits. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association of plasma ANGPTL3 and ANGPTL4 concentrations with lipid and metabolic traits in a large community-based sample.
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Genome-wide association study for circulating tissue plasminogen activator levels and functional follow-up implicates endothelial STXBP5 and STX2.
Jie Huang, Jennifer E Huffman, Munekazu Yamakuchi, Munekazu Yamkauchi, Stella Trompet, Folkert W Asselbergs, Maria Sabater-Lleal, David-Alexandre Trégouët, Wei-Min Chen, Nicholas L Smith, Marcus E Kleber, So-Youn Shin, Diane M Becker, Weihong Tang, Abbas Dehghan, Andrew D Johnson, Vinh Truong, Lasse Folkersen, Qiong Yang, Tiphaine Oudot-Mellkah, Brendan M Buckley, Jason H Moore, Frances M K Williams, Harry Campbell, Günther Silbernagel, Veronique Vitart, Igor Rudan, Geoffrey H Tofler, Gerjan J Navis, Anita DeStefano, Alan F Wright, Ming-Huei Chen, Anton J M de Craen, Bradford B Worrall, Alicja R Rudnicka, Ann Rumley, Ebony B Bookman, Bruce M Psaty, Fang Chen, Keith L Keene, Oscar H Franco, Bernhard O Böhm, André G Uitterlinden, Angela M Carter, J Wouter Jukema, Naveed Sattar, Joshua C Bis, Mohammad A Ikram, , Michèle M Sale, Barbara McKnight, Myriam Fornage, Ian Ford, Kent Taylor, P Eline Slagboom, Wendy L McArdle, Fang-Chi Hsu, Anders Franco-Cereceda, Alison H Goodall, Lisa R Yanek, Karen L Furie, Mary Cushman, Albert Hofman, Jacqueline C M Witteman, Aaron R Folsom, Saonli Basu, Nena Matijevic, Wiek H van Gilst, James F Wilson, Rudi G J Westendorp, Sekar Kathiresan, Muredach P Reilly, Russell P Tracy, Ozren Polašek, Bernhard R Winkelmann, Peter J Grant, Hans L Hillege, Francois Cambien, David J Stott, Gordon D Lowe, Timothy D Spector, James B Meigs, Winfried März, Per Eriksson, Lewis C Becker, Pierre-Emmanuel Morange, Nicole Soranzo, Scott M Williams, Caroline Hayward, Pim van der Harst, Anders Hamsten, Charles J Lowenstein, David P Strachan, Christopher J O'Donnell.
Arterioscler. Thromb. Vasc. Biol.
PUBLISHED: 02-27-2014
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Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), a serine protease, catalyzes the conversion of plasminogen to plasmin, the major enzyme responsible for endogenous fibrinolysis. In some populations, elevated plasma levels of tPA have been associated with myocardial infarction and other cardiovascular diseases. We conducted a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies to identify novel correlates of circulating levels of tPA.
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Gene-centric meta-analysis in 87,736 individuals of European ancestry identifies multiple blood-pressure-related loci.
Vinicius Tragante, Michael R Barnes, Santhi K Ganesh, Matthew B Lanktree, Wei Guo, Nora Franceschini, Erin N Smith, Toby Johnson, Michael V Holmes, Sandosh Padmanabhan, Konrad J Karczewski, Berta Almoguera, John Barnard, Jens Baumert, Yen-Pei Christy Chang, Clara C Elbers, Martin Farrall, Mary E Fischer, Tom R Gaunt, Johannes M I H Gho, Christian Gieger, Anuj Goel, Yan Gong, Aaron Isaacs, Marcus E Kleber, Irene Mateo Leach, Caitrin W McDonough, Matthijs F L Meijs, Olle Melander, Christopher P Nelson, Ilja M Nolte, Nathan Pankratz, Tom S Price, Jonathan Shaffer, Sonia Shah, Maciej Tomaszewski, Peter J van der Most, Erik P A van Iperen, Judith M Vonk, Kate Witkowska, Caroline O L Wong, Li Zhang, Amber L Beitelshees, Gerald S Berenson, Deepak L Bhatt, Morris Brown, Amber Burt, Rhonda M Cooper-DeHoff, John M Connell, Karen J Cruickshanks, Sean P Curtis, George Davey-Smith, Christian Delles, Ron T Gansevoort, Xiuqing Guo, Shen Haiqing, Claire E Hastie, Marten H Hofker, G Kees Hovingh, Daniel S Kim, Susan A Kirkland, Barbara E Klein, Ronald Klein, Yun R Li, Steffi Maiwald, Christopher Newton-Cheh, Eoin T O'Brien, N Charlotte Onland-Moret, Walter Palmas, Afshin Parsa, Brenda W Penninx, Mary Pettinger, Ramachandran S Vasan, Jane E Ranchalis, Paul M Ridker, Lynda M Rose, Peter Sever, Daichi Shimbo, Laura Steele, Ronald P Stolk, Barbara Thorand, Mieke D Trip, Cornelia M van Duijn, W Monique Verschuren, Cisca Wijmenga, Sharon Wyatt, J Hunter Young, Aeilko H Zwinderman, Connie R Bezzina, Eric Boerwinkle, Juan P Casas, Mark J Caulfield, Aravinda Chakravarti, Daniel I Chasman, Karina W Davidson, Pieter A Doevendans, Anna F Dominiczak, Garret A FitzGerald, John G Gums, Myriam Fornage, Hakon Hakonarson, Indrani Halder, Hans L Hillege, Thomas Illig, Gail P Jarvik, Julie A Johnson, John J P Kastelein, Wolfgang Koenig, Meena Kumari, Winfried März, Sarah S Murray, Jeffery R O'Connell, Albertine J Oldehinkel, James S Pankow, Daniel J Rader, Susan Redline, Muredach P Reilly, Eric E Schadt, Kandice Kottke-Marchant, Harold Snieder, Michael Snyder, Alice V Stanton, Martin D Tobin, André G Uitterlinden, Pim van der Harst, Yvonne T van der Schouw, Nilesh J Samani, Hugh Watkins, Andrew D Johnson, Alex P Reiner, Xiaofeng Zhu, Paul I W de Bakker, Daniel Levy, Folkert W Asselbergs, Patricia B Munroe, Brendan J Keating.
Am. J. Hum. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 02-20-2014
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Blood pressure (BP) is a heritable risk factor for cardiovascular disease. To investigate genetic associations with systolic BP (SBP), diastolic BP (DBP), mean arterial pressure (MAP), and pulse pressure (PP), we genotyped ~50,000 SNPs in up to 87,736 individuals of European ancestry and combined these in a meta-analysis. We replicated findings in an independent set of 68,368 individuals of European ancestry. Our analyses identified 11 previously undescribed associations in independent loci containing 31 genes including PDE1A, HLA-DQB1, CDK6, PRKAG2, VCL, H19, NUCB2, RELA, HOXC@ complex, FBN1, and NFAT5 at the Bonferroni-corrected array-wide significance threshold (p < 6 × 10(-7)) and confirmed 27 previously reported associations. Bioinformatic analysis of the 11 loci provided support for a putative role in hypertension of several genes, such as CDK6 and NUCB2. Analysis of potential pharmacological targets in databases of small molecules showed that ten of the genes are predicted to be a target for small molecules. In summary, we identified previously unknown loci associated with BP. Our findings extend our understanding of genes involved in BP regulation, which may provide new targets for therapeutic intervention or drug response stratification.
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Tissue-specific RNA-Seq in human evoked inflammation identifies blood and adipose LincRNA signatures of cardiometabolic diseases.
Arterioscler. Thromb. Vasc. Biol.
PUBLISHED: 02-06-2014
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Inappropriate transcriptional activation of innate immunity is a pathological feature of several cardiometabolic disorders, but little is known about inflammatory modulation of long intergenic noncoding RNAs (lincRNAs) in disease-relevant human tissues.
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Association of low-frequency and rare coding-sequence variants with blood lipids and coronary heart disease in 56,000 whites and blacks.
Gina M Peloso, Paul L Auer, Joshua C Bis, Arend Voorman, Alanna C Morrison, Nathan O Stitziel, Jennifer A Brody, Sumeet A Khetarpal, Jacy R Crosby, Myriam Fornage, Aaron Isaacs, Johanna Jakobsdottir, Mary F Feitosa, Gail Davies, Jennifer E Huffman, Ani Manichaikul, Brian Davis, Kurt Lohman, Aron Y Joon, Albert V Smith, Megan L Grove, Paolo Zanoni, Valeska Redon, Serkalem Demissie, Kim Lawson, Ulrike Peters, Christopher Carlson, Rebecca D Jackson, Kelli K Ryckman, Rachel H Mackey, Jennifer G Robinson, David S Siscovick, Pamela J Schreiner, Josyf C Mychaleckyj, James S Pankow, Albert Hofman, André G Uitterlinden, Tamara B Harris, Kent D Taylor, Jeanette M Stafford, Lindsay M Reynolds, Riccardo E Marioni, Abbas Dehghan, Oscar H Franco, Aniruddh P Patel, Yingchang Lu, George Hindy, Omri Gottesman, Erwin P Bottinger, Olle Melander, Marju Orho-Melander, Ruth J F Loos, Stefano Duga, Piera Angelica Merlini, Martin Farrall, Anuj Goel, Rosanna Asselta, Domenico Girelli, Nicola Martinelli, Svati H Shah, William E Kraus, Mingyao Li, Daniel J Rader, Muredach P Reilly, Ruth McPherson, Hugh Watkins, Diego Ardissino, , Qunyuan Zhang, Judy Wang, Michael Y Tsai, Herman A Taylor, Adolfo Correa, Michael E Griswold, Leslie A Lange, John M Starr, Igor Rudan, Gudny Eiriksdottir, Lenore J Launer, José M Ordovás, Daniel Levy, Y-D Ida Chen, Alexander P Reiner, Caroline Hayward, Ozren Polašek, Ian J Deary, Ingrid B Borecki, Yongmei Liu, Vilmundur Gudnason, James G Wilson, Cornelia M van Duijn, Charles Kooperberg, Stephen S Rich, Bruce M Psaty, Jerome I Rotter, Christopher J O'Donnell, Kenneth Rice, Eric Boerwinkle, Sekar Kathiresan, L Adrienne Cupples.
Am. J. Hum. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 01-09-2014
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Low-frequency coding DNA sequence variants in the proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 gene (PCSK9) lower plasma low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), protect against risk of coronary heart disease (CHD), and have prompted the development of a new class of therapeutics. It is uncertain whether the PCSK9 example represents a paradigm or an isolated exception. We used the "Exome Array" to genotype >200,000 low-frequency and rare coding sequence variants across the genome in 56,538 individuals (42,208 European ancestry [EA] and 14,330 African ancestry [AA]) and tested these variants for association with LDL-C, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), and triglycerides. Although we did not identify new genes associated with LDL-C, we did identify four low-frequency (frequencies between 0.1% and 2%) variants (ANGPTL8 rs145464906 [c.361C>T; p.Gln121*], PAFAH1B2 rs186808413 [c.482C>T; p.Ser161Leu], COL18A1 rs114139997 [c.331G>A; p.Gly111Arg], and PCSK7 rs142953140 [c.1511G>A; p.Arg504His]) with large effects on HDL-C and/or triglycerides. None of these four variants was associated with risk for CHD, suggesting that examples of low-frequency coding variants with robust effects on both lipids and CHD will be limited.
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ABO blood type A is associated with increased risk of ARDS in whites following both major trauma and severe sepsis.
Chest
PUBLISHED: 01-04-2014
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ABO glycosyltransferases catalyze antigen modifications on various glycans and glycoproteins and determine the ABO blood types. Blood type A has been associated with increased risk of vascular diseases and differential circulating levels of proteins related to inflammation and endothelial function. The objective of this study was to determine the association of ABO blood types with ARDS risk in patients with major trauma and severe sepsis.
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PennSeq: accurate isoform-specific gene expression quantification in RNA-Seq by modeling non-uniform read distribution.
Nucleic Acids Res.
PUBLISHED: 12-20-2013
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Correctly estimating isoform-specific gene expression is important for understanding complicated biological mechanisms and for mapping disease susceptibility genes. However, estimating isoform-specific gene expression is challenging because various biases present in RNA-Seq (RNA sequencing) data complicate the analysis, and if not appropriately corrected, can affect isoform expression estimation and downstream analysis. In this article, we present PennSeq, a statistical method that allows each isoform to have its own non-uniform read distribution. Instead of making parametric assumptions, we give adequate weight to the underlying data by the use of a non-parametric approach. Our rationale is that regardless what factors lead to non-uniformity, whether it is due to hexamer priming bias, local sequence bias, positional bias, RNA degradation, mapping bias or other unknown reasons, the probability that a fragment is sampled from a particular region will be reflected in the aligned data. This empirical approach thus maximally reflects the true underlying non-uniform read distribution. We evaluate the performance of PennSeq using both simulated data with known ground truth, and using two real Illumina RNA-Seq data sets including one with quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction measurements. Our results indicate superior performance of PennSeq over existing methods, particularly for isoforms demonstrating severe non-uniformity. PennSeq is freely available for download at http://sourceforge.net/projects/pennseq.
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Gene-centric meta-analyses for central adiposity traits in up to 57,412 individuals of European descent confirm known loci and reveal several novel associations.
Hum. Mol. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 12-17-2013
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Waist circumference (WC) and waist-to-hip ratio (WHR) are surrogate measures of central adiposity that are associated with adverse cardiovascular events, type 2 diabetes, and cancer independent of body mass index (BMI). WC and WHR are highly heritable with multiple susceptibility loci identified to date. We assessed the association between SNPs and BMI-adjusted WC and WHR and unadjusted WC in up to 57,412 individuals of European descent from 22 cohorts collaborating with the NHLBIs Candidate Gene Association Resource (CARe) project. The study population consisted of women and men aged 20 to 80. Study participants were genotyped using the ITMAT/Broad/CARE array, which includes ?50,000 cosmopolitan tagged SNPs across ?2,100 cardiovascular-related genes. Each trait was modeled as a function of age, study site, and principal components to control for population stratification, and we conducted a fixed-effects meta-analysis. No new loci for WC were observed. For WHR analyses, three novel loci were significantly associated (P<2.4x10(-6)). Previously unreported rs2811337-G near TMCC1 was associated with increased WHR (?±SE,0.048±0.008, P=7.7x10(-9)) as was rs7302703-G in HOXC10 (?=0.044±0.008, P=2.9x10(-7)) and rs936108-C in PEMT (?=0.035±0.007, P=1.9x10(-6)). Sex-stratified analyses revealed two additional novel signals among females only, rs12076073-A near SHC1 (?=0.10±0.02, P=1.9x10(-6)), and rs1037575-A in ATBDB4 (?=0.046±0.01, P=2.2x10(-6)), supporting an already established sexual dimorphism of central adiposity-related genetic variants. Functional analysis using ENCODE and eQTL databases revealed that several of these loci are in regulatory regions or regions with differential expression in adipose tissue.
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Higher plasma CXCL12 levels predict incident myocardial infarction and death in chronic kidney disease: findings from the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort study.
Eur. Heart J.
PUBLISHED: 12-04-2013
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Genome-wide association studies revealed an association between a locus at 10q11, downstream from CXCL12, and myocardial infarction (MI). However, the relationship among plasma CXCL12, cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors, incident MI, and death is unknown.
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Importance of evaluating cell cholesterol influx with efflux in determining the impact of human serum on cholesterol metabolism and atherosclerosis.
Arterioscler. Thromb. Vasc. Biol.
PUBLISHED: 11-07-2013
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Cholesterol efflux relates to cardiovascular disease but cannot predict cellular cholesterol mass changes. We asked whether influx and net flux assays provide additional insights.
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Improvement in insulin sensitivity after human islet transplantation for type 1 diabetes.
J. Clin. Endocrinol. Metab.
PUBLISHED: 10-01-2013
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Islet transplantation can improve metabolic control for type 1 diabetes (T1D), an effect anticipated to improve insulin sensitivity. However, current immunosuppression regimens containing tacrolimus and sirolimus have been shown to induce insulin resistance in rodents.
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Dysfunctional nitric oxide signalling increases risk of myocardial infarction.
Nature
PUBLISHED: 09-27-2013
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Myocardial infarction, a leading cause of death in the Western world, usually occurs when the fibrous cap overlying an atherosclerotic plaque in a coronary artery ruptures. The resulting exposure of blood to the atherosclerotic material then triggers thrombus formation, which occludes the artery. The importance of genetic predisposition to coronary artery disease and myocardial infarction is best documented by the predictive value of a positive family history. Next-generation sequencing in families with several affected individuals has revolutionized mutation identification. Here we report the segregation of two private, heterozygous mutations in two functionally related genes, GUCY1A3 (p.Leu163Phefs*24) and CCT7 (p.Ser525Leu), in an extended myocardial infarction family. GUCY1A3 encodes the ?1 subunit of soluble guanylyl cyclase (?1-sGC), and CCT7 encodes CCT?, a member of the tailless complex polypeptide 1 ring complex, which, among other functions, stabilizes soluble guanylyl cyclase. After stimulation with nitric oxide, soluble guanylyl cyclase generates cGMP, which induces vasodilation and inhibits platelet activation. We demonstrate in vitro that mutations in both GUCY1A3 and CCT7 severely reduce ?1-sGC as well as ?1-sGC protein content, and impair soluble guanylyl cyclase activity. Moreover, platelets from digenic mutation carriers contained less soluble guanylyl cyclase protein and consequently displayed reduced nitric-oxide-induced cGMP formation. Mice deficient in ?1-sGC protein displayed accelerated thrombus formation in the microcirculation after local trauma. Starting with a severely affected family, we have identified a link between impaired soluble-guanylyl-cyclase-dependent nitric oxide signalling and myocardial infarction risk, possibly through accelerated thrombus formation. Reversing this defect may provide a new therapeutic target for reducing the risk of myocardial infarction.
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Exome sequencing and directed clinical phenotyping diagnose cholesterol ester storage disease presenting as autosomal recessive hypercholesterolemia.
Arterioscler. Thromb. Vasc. Biol.
PUBLISHED: 09-26-2013
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Autosomal recessive hypercholesterolemia is a rare inherited disorder, characterized by extremely high total and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels, that has been previously linked to mutations in LDLRAP1. We identified a family with autosomal recessive hypercholesterolemia not explained by mutations in LDLRAP1 or other genes known to cause monogenic hypercholesterolemia. The aim of this study was to identify the molecular pathogenesis of autosomal recessive hypercholesterolemia in this family.
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Discovery and refinement of loci associated with lipid levels.
, Cristen J Willer, Ellen M Schmidt, Sebanti Sengupta, Gina M Peloso, Stefan Gustafsson, Stavroula Kanoni, Andrea Ganna, Jin Chen, Martin L Buchkovich, Samia Mora, Jacques S Beckmann, Jennifer L Bragg-Gresham, Hsing-Yi Chang, Ayse Demirkan, Heleen M den Hertog, Ron Do, Louise A Donnelly, Georg B Ehret, Tonu Esko, Mary F Feitosa, Teresa Ferreira, Krista Fischer, Pierre Fontanillas, Ross M Fraser, Daniel F Freitag, Deepti Gurdasani, Kauko Heikkilä, Elina Hyppönen, Aaron Isaacs, Anne U Jackson, Asa Johansson, Toby Johnson, Marika Kaakinen, Johannes Kettunen, Marcus E Kleber, Xiaohui Li, Jian'an Luan, Leo-Pekka Lyytikäinen, Patrik K E Magnusson, Massimo Mangino, Evelin Mihailov, May E Montasser, Martina Müller-Nurasyid, Ilja M Nolte, Jeffrey R O'Connell, Cameron D Palmer, Markus Perola, Ann-Kristin Petersen, Serena Sanna, Richa Saxena, Susan K Service, Sonia Shah, Dmitry Shungin, Carlo Sidore, Ci Song, Rona J Strawbridge, Ida Surakka, Toshiko Tanaka, Tanya M Teslovich, Gudmar Thorleifsson, Evita G van den Herik, Benjamin F Voight, Kelly A Volcik, Lindsay L Waite, Andrew Wong, Ying Wu, Weihua Zhang, Devin Absher, Gershim Asiki, Inês Barroso, Latonya F Been, Jennifer L Bolton, Lori L Bonnycastle, Paolo Brambilla, Mary S Burnett, Giancarlo Cesana, Maria Dimitriou, Alex S F Doney, Angela Döring, Paul Elliott, Stephen E Epstein, Gudmundur Ingi Eyjolfsson, Bruna Gigante, Mark O Goodarzi, Harald Grallert, Martha L Gravito, Christopher J Groves, Göran Hallmans, Anna-Liisa Hartikainen, Caroline Hayward, Dena Hernandez, Andrew A Hicks, Hilma Holm, Yi-Jen Hung, Thomas Illig, Michelle R Jones, Pontiano Kaleebu, John J P Kastelein, Kay-Tee Khaw, Eric Kim, Norman Klopp, Pirjo Komulainen, Meena Kumari, Claudia Langenberg, Terho Lehtimäki, Shih-Yi Lin, Jaana Lindström, Ruth J F Loos, François Mach, Wendy L McArdle, Christa Meisinger, Braxton D Mitchell, Gabrielle Müller, Ramaiah Nagaraja, Narisu Narisu, Tuomo V M Nieminen, Rebecca N Nsubuga, Isleifur Olafsson, Ken K Ong, Aarno Palotie, Theodore Papamarkou, Cristina Pomilla, Anneli Pouta, Daniel J Rader, Muredach P Reilly, Paul M Ridker, Fernando Rivadeneira, Igor Rudan, Aimo Ruokonen, Nilesh Samani, Hubert Scharnagl, Janet Seeley, Kaisa Silander, Alena Stančáková, Kathleen Stirrups, Amy J Swift, Laurence Tiret, André G Uitterlinden, L Joost van Pelt, Sailaja Vedantam, Nicholas Wainwright, Cisca Wijmenga, Sarah H Wild, Gonneke Willemsen, Tom Wilsgaard, James F Wilson, Elizabeth H Young, Jing Hua Zhao, Linda S Adair, Dominique Arveiler, Themistocles L Assimes, Stefania Bandinelli, Franklyn Bennett, Murielle Bochud, Bernhard O Boehm, Dorret I Boomsma, Ingrid B Borecki, Stefan R Bornstein, Pascal Bovet, Michel Burnier, Harry Campbell, Aravinda Chakravarti, John C Chambers, Yii-Der Ida Chen, Francis S Collins, Richard S Cooper, John Danesh, George Dedoussis, Ulf de Faire, Alan B Feranil, Jean Ferrières, Luigi Ferrucci, Nelson B Freimer, Christian Gieger, Leif C Groop, Vilmundur Gudnason, Ulf Gyllensten, Anders Hamsten, Tamara B Harris, Aroon Hingorani, Joel N Hirschhorn, Albert Hofman, G Kees Hovingh, Chao Agnes Hsiung, Steve E Humphries, Steven C Hunt, Kristian Hveem, Carlos Iribarren, Marjo-Riitta Järvelin, Antti Jula, Mika Kähönen, Jaakko Kaprio, Antero Kesäniemi, Mika Kivimäki, Jaspal S Kooner, Peter J Koudstaal, Ronald M Krauss, Diana Kuh, Johanna Kuusisto, Kirsten O Kyvik, Markku Laakso, Timo A Lakka, Lars Lind, Cecilia M Lindgren, Nicholas G Martin, Winfried März, Mark I McCarthy, Colin A McKenzie, Pierre Meneton, Andres Metspalu, Leena Moilanen, Andrew D Morris, Patricia B Munroe, Inger Njølstad, Nancy L Pedersen, Chris Power, Peter P Pramstaller, Jackie F Price, Bruce M Psaty, Thomas Quertermous, Rainer Rauramaa, Danish Saleheen, Veikko Salomaa, Dharambir K Sanghera, Jouko Saramies, Peter E H Schwarz, Wayne H-H Sheu, Alan R Shuldiner, Agneta Siegbahn, Tim D Spector, Kari Stefansson, David P Strachan, Bamidele O Tayo, Elena Tremoli, Jaakko Tuomilehto, Matti Uusitupa, Cornelia M van Duijn, Peter Vollenweider, Lars Wallentin, Nicholas J Wareham, John B Whitfield, Bruce H R Wolffenbuttel, José M Ordovás, Eric Boerwinkle, Colin N A Palmer, Unnur Thorsteinsdottir, Daniel I Chasman, Jerome I Rotter, Paul W Franks, Samuli Ripatti, L Adrienne Cupples, Manjinder S Sandhu, Stephen S Rich, Michael Boehnke, Panos Deloukas, Sekar Kathiresan, Karen L Mohlke, Erik Ingelsson, Gonçalo R Abecasis.
Nat. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 09-13-2013
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Levels of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, triglycerides and total cholesterol are heritable, modifiable risk factors for coronary artery disease. To identify new loci and refine known loci influencing these lipids, we examined 188,577 individuals using genome-wide and custom genotyping arrays. We identify and annotate 157 loci associated with lipid levels at P < 5 × 10(-8), including 62 loci not previously associated with lipid levels in humans. Using dense genotyping in individuals of European, East Asian, South Asian and African ancestry, we narrow association signals in 12 loci. We find that loci associated with blood lipid levels are often associated with cardiovascular and metabolic traits, including coronary artery disease, type 2 diabetes, blood pressure, waist-hip ratio and body mass index. Our results demonstrate the value of using genetic data from individuals of diverse ancestry and provide insights into the biological mechanisms regulating blood lipids to guide future genetic, biological and therapeutic research.
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Multiethnic meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies in >100 000 subjects identifies 23 fibrinogen-associated Loci but no strong evidence of a causal association between circulating fibrinogen and cardiovascular disease.
Maria Sabater-Lleal, Jie Huang, Daniel Chasman, Silvia Naitza, Abbas Dehghan, Andrew D Johnson, Alexander Teumer, Alex P Reiner, Lasse Folkersen, Saonli Basu, Alicja R Rudnicka, Stella Trompet, Anders Malarstig, Jens Baumert, Joshua C Bis, Xiuqing Guo, Jouke J Hottenga, So-Youn Shin, Lorna M Lopez, Jari Lahti, Toshiko Tanaka, Lisa R Yanek, Tiphaine Oudot-Mellakh, James F Wilson, Pau Navarro, Jennifer E Huffman, Tatijana Zemunik, Susan Redline, Reena Mehra, Drazen Pulanić, Igor Rudan, Alan F Wright, Ivana Kolčić, Ozren Polašek, Sarah H Wild, Harry Campbell, J David Curb, Robert Wallace, Simin Liu, Charles B Eaton, Diane M Becker, Lewis C Becker, Stefania Bandinelli, Katri Räikkönen, Elisabeth Widén, Aarno Palotie, Myriam Fornage, David Green, Myron Gross, Gail Davies, Sarah E Harris, David C Liewald, John M Starr, Frances M K Williams, Peter J Grant, Timothy D Spector, Rona J Strawbridge, Angela Silveira, Bengt Sennblad, Fernando Rivadeneira, André G Uitterlinden, Oscar H Franco, Albert Hofman, Jenny van Dongen, Gonneke Willemsen, Dorret I Boomsma, Jie Yao, Nancy Swords Jenny, Talin Haritunians, Barbara McKnight, Thomas Lumley, Kent D Taylor, Jerome I Rotter, Bruce M Psaty, Annette Peters, Christian Gieger, Thomas Illig, Anne Grotevendt, Georg Homuth, Henry Völzke, Thomas Kocher, Anuj Goel, Maria Grazia Franzosi, Udo Seedorf, Robert Clarke, Maristella Steri, Kirill V Tarasov, Serena Sanna, David Schlessinger, David J Stott, Naveed Sattar, Brendan M Buckley, Ann Rumley, Gordon D Lowe, Wendy L McArdle, Ming-Huei Chen, Geoffrey H Tofler, Jaejoon Song, Eric Boerwinkle, Aaron R Folsom, Lynda M Rose, Anders Franco-Cereceda, Martina Teichert, M Arfan Ikram, Thomas H Mosley, Steve Bevan, Martin Dichgans, Peter M Rothwell, Cathie L M Sudlow, Jemma C Hopewell, John C Chambers, Danish Saleheen, Jaspal S Kooner, John Danesh, Christopher P Nelson, Jeanette Erdmann, Muredach P Reilly, Sekar Kathiresan, Heribert Schunkert, Pierre-Emmanuel Morange, Luigi Ferrucci, Johan G Eriksson, David Jacobs, Ian J Deary, Nicole Soranzo, Jacqueline C M Witteman, Eco J C de Geus, Russell P Tracy, Caroline Hayward, Wolfgang Koenig, Francesco Cucca, J Wouter Jukema, Per Eriksson, Sudha Seshadri, Hugh S Markus, Hugh Watkins, Nilesh J Samani, , Henri Wallaschofski, Nicholas L Smith, David Tregouet, Paul M Ridker, Weihong Tang, David P Strachan, Anders Hamsten, Christopher J O'Donnell.
Circulation
PUBLISHED: 08-22-2013
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Estimates of the heritability of plasma fibrinogen concentration, an established predictor of cardiovascular disease, range from 34% to 50%. Genetic variants so far identified by genome-wide association studies explain only a small proportion (<2%) of its variation.
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Differential Associations of Oral Glucose Tolerance Test-Derived Measures of Insulin Sensitivity and Pancreatic ?-Cell Function With Coronary Artery Calcification and Microalbuminuria in Type 2 Diabetes.
Diabetes Care
PUBLISHED: 08-15-2013
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OBJECTIVE We evaluated relationships of oral glucose tolerance testing (OGTT)-derived measures of insulin sensitivity and pancreatic ?-cell function with indices of diabetes complications in a cross-sectional study of patients with type 2 diabetes who are free of overt cardiovascular or renal disease. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS A subset of participants from the Penn Diabetes Heart Study (n = 672; mean age 59 ± 8 years; 67% male; 60% Caucasian) underwent a standard 2-h, 75-g OGTT. Insulin sensitivity was estimated using the Matsuda Insulin Sensitivity Index (ISI), and ?-cell function was estimated using the Insulinogenic Index. Multivariable modeling was used to analyze associations between quartiles of each index with coronary artery calcification (CAC) and microalbuminuria. RESULTS The Insulinogenic Index and Matsuda ISI had distinct associations with cardiometabolic risk factors. The top quartile of the Matsuda ISI had a negative association with CAC that remained significant after adjusting for traditional cardiovascular risk factors (Tobit ratio -0.78 [95% CI -1.51 to -0.05]; P = 0.035), but the Insulinogenic Index was not associated with CAC. Conversely, the highest quartile of the Insulinogenic Index, but not the Matsuda ISI, was associated with lower odds of microalbuminuria (OR 0.52 [95% CI 0.30-0.91]; P = 0.022); however, this association was attenuated in models that included duration of diabetes. CONCLUSIONS Lower ?-cell function is associated with microalbuminuria, a microvascular complication, while impaired insulin sensitivity is associated with higher CAC, a predictor of macrovascular complications. Despite these pathophysiological insights, the Matsuda ISI and Insulinogenic Index are unlikely to be translated into clinical use in type 2 diabetes beyond established clinical variables, such as obesity or duration of diabetes.
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Genetics of coronary artery calcification among African Americans, a meta-analysis.
BMC Med. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 07-18-2013
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Coronary heart disease (CHD) is the major cause of death in the United States. Coronary artery calcification (CAC) scores are independent predictors of CHD. African Americans (AA) have higher rates of CHD but are less well-studied in genomic studies. We assembled the largest AA data resource currently available with measured CAC to identify associated genetic variants.
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Omega-3 PUFA supplementation and the response to evoked endotoxemia in healthy volunteers.
Mol Nutr Food Res
PUBLISHED: 05-21-2013
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Fish oil-derived n-3 PUFA may improve cardiometabolic health through modulation of innate immunity. However, findings in clinical studies are conflicting. We hypothesized that n-3 PUFA supplementation would dose-dependently reduce the systemic inflammatory response to experimental endotoxemia in healthy humans.
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Identification of seven loci affecting mean telomere length and their association with disease.
Veryan Codd, Christopher P Nelson, Eva Albrecht, Massimo Mangino, Joris Deelen, Jessica L Buxton, Jouke Jan Hottenga, Krista Fischer, Tonu Esko, Ida Surakka, Linda Broer, Dale R Nyholt, Irene Mateo Leach, Perttu Salo, Sara Hägg, Mary K Matthews, Jutta Palmen, Giuseppe D Norata, Paul F O'Reilly, Danish Saleheen, Najaf Amin, Anthony J Balmforth, Marian Beekman, Rudolf A de Boer, Stefan Böhringer, Peter S Braund, Paul R Burton, Anton J M de Craen, Matthew Denniff, Yanbin Dong, Konstantinos Douroudis, Elena Dubinina, Johan G Eriksson, Katia Garlaschelli, Dehuang Guo, Anna-Liisa Hartikainen, Anjali K Henders, Jeanine J Houwing-Duistermaat, Laura Kananen, Lennart C Karssen, Johannes Kettunen, Norman Klopp, Vasiliki Lagou, Elisabeth M van Leeuwen, Pamela A Madden, Reedik Mägi, Patrik K E Magnusson, Satu Mannisto, Mark I McCarthy, Sarah E Medland, Evelin Mihailov, Grant W Montgomery, Ben A Oostra, Aarno Palotie, Annette Peters, Helen Pollard, Anneli Pouta, Inga Prokopenko, Samuli Ripatti, Veikko Salomaa, H Eka D Suchiman, Ana M Valdes, Niek Verweij, Ana Viñuela, Xiaoling Wang, H-Erich Wichmann, Elisabeth Widén, Gonneke Willemsen, Margaret J Wright, Kai Xia, Xiangjun Xiao, Dirk J van Veldhuisen, Alberico L Catapano, Martin D Tobin, Alistair S Hall, Alexandra I F Blakemore, Wiek H van Gilst, Haidong Zhu, Cardiogram Consortium, Jeanette Erdmann, Muredach P Reilly, Sekar Kathiresan, Heribert Schunkert, Philippa J Talmud, Nancy L Pedersen, Markus Perola, Willem Ouwehand, Jaakko Kaprio, Nicholas G Martin, Cornelia M van Duijn, Iiris Hovatta, Christian Gieger, Andres Metspalu, Dorret I Boomsma, Marjo-Riitta Järvelin, P Eline Slagboom, John R Thompson, Tim D Spector, Pim van der Harst, Nilesh J Samani.
Nat. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 03-29-2013
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Interindividual variation in mean leukocyte telomere length (LTL) is associated with cancer and several age-associated diseases. We report here a genome-wide meta-analysis of 37,684 individuals with replication of selected variants in an additional 10,739 individuals. We identified seven loci, including five new loci, associated with mean LTL (P < 5 × 10(-8)). Five of the loci contain candidate genes (TERC, TERT, NAF1, OBFC1 and RTEL1) that are known to be involved in telomere biology. Lead SNPs at two loci (TERC and TERT) associate with several cancers and other diseases, including idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Moreover, a genetic risk score analysis combining lead variants at all 7 loci in 22,233 coronary artery disease cases and 64,762 controls showed an association of the alleles associated with shorter LTL with increased risk of coronary artery disease (21% (95% confidence interval, 5-35%) per standard deviation in LTL, P = 0.014). Our findings support a causal role of telomere-length variation in some age-related diseases.
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Measurement of waist circumference predicts coronary atherosclerosis beyond plasma adipokines.
Obesity (Silver Spring)
PUBLISHED: 03-19-2013
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The association of plasma adipokines beyond waist circumference (WC) with coronary artery calcification (CAC), a measure of subclinical atherosclerosis, is unknown.
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Genetic predisposition to higher blood pressure increases coronary artery disease risk.
Hypertension
PUBLISHED: 03-11-2013
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Hypertension is a risk factor for coronary artery disease. Recent genome-wide association studies have identified 30 genetic variants associated with higher blood pressure at genome-wide significance (P<5 × 10(-8)). If elevated blood pressure is a causative factor for coronary artery disease, these variants should also increase coronary artery disease risk. Analyzing genome-wide association data from 22 233 coronary artery disease cases and 64 762 controls, we observed in the Coronary ARtery DIsease Genome-Wide Replication And Meta-Analysis (CARDIoGRAM) consortium that 88% of these blood pressure-associated polymorphisms were likewise positively associated with coronary artery disease, that is, they had an odds ratio >1 for coronary artery disease, a proportion much higher than expected by chance (P=4 × 10(-5)). The average relative coronary artery disease risk increase per each of the multiple blood pressure-raising alleles observed in the consortium was 3.0% for systolic blood pressure-associated polymorphisms (95% confidence interval, 1.8%-4.3%) and 2.9% for diastolic blood pressure-associated polymorphisms (95% confidence interval, 1.7%-4.1%). In substudies, individuals carrying most systolic blood pressure- and diastolic blood pressure-related risk alleles (top quintile of a genetic risk score distribution) had 70% (95% confidence interval, 50%-94%) and 59% (95% confidence interval, 40%-81%) higher odds of having coronary artery disease, respectively, as compared with individuals in the bottom quintile. In conclusion, most blood pressure-associated polymorphisms also confer an increased risk for coronary artery disease. These findings are consistent with a causal relationship of increasing blood pressure to coronary artery disease. Genetic variants primarily affecting blood pressure contribute to the genetic basis of coronary artery disease.
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Common variants associated with plasma triglycerides and risk for coronary artery disease.
Ron Do, Cristen J Willer, Ellen M Schmidt, Sebanti Sengupta, Chi Gao, Gina M Peloso, Stefan Gustafsson, Stavroula Kanoni, Andrea Ganna, Jin Chen, Martin L Buchkovich, Samia Mora, Jacques S Beckmann, Jennifer L Bragg-Gresham, Hsing-Yi Chang, Ayse Demirkan, Heleen M den Hertog, Louise A Donnelly, Georg B Ehret, Tonu Esko, Mary F Feitosa, Teresa Ferreira, Krista Fischer, Pierre Fontanillas, Ross M Fraser, Daniel F Freitag, Deepti Gurdasani, Kauko Heikkilä, Elina Hyppönen, Aaron Isaacs, Anne U Jackson, Asa Johansson, Toby Johnson, Marika Kaakinen, Johannes Kettunen, Marcus E Kleber, Xiaohui Li, Jian'an Luan, Leo-Pekka Lyytikäinen, Patrik K E Magnusson, Massimo Mangino, Evelin Mihailov, May E Montasser, Martina Müller-Nurasyid, Ilja M Nolte, Jeffrey R O'Connell, Cameron D Palmer, Markus Perola, Ann-Kristin Petersen, Serena Sanna, Richa Saxena, Susan K Service, Sonia Shah, Dmitry Shungin, Carlo Sidore, Ci Song, Rona J Strawbridge, Ida Surakka, Toshiko Tanaka, Tanya M Teslovich, Gudmar Thorleifsson, Evita G van den Herik, Benjamin F Voight, Kelly A Volcik, Lindsay L Waite, Andrew Wong, Ying Wu, Weihua Zhang, Devin Absher, Gershim Asiki, Inês Barroso, Latonya F Been, Jennifer L Bolton, Lori L Bonnycastle, Paolo Brambilla, Mary S Burnett, Giancarlo Cesana, Maria Dimitriou, Alex S F Doney, Angela Döring, Paul Elliott, Stephen E Epstein, Gudmundur Ingi Eyjolfsson, Bruna Gigante, Mark O Goodarzi, Harald Grallert, Martha L Gravito, Christopher J Groves, Göran Hallmans, Anna-Liisa Hartikainen, Caroline Hayward, Dena Hernandez, Andrew A Hicks, Hilma Holm, Yi-Jen Hung, Thomas Illig, Michelle R Jones, Pontiano Kaleebu, John J P Kastelein, Kay-Tee Khaw, Eric Kim, Norman Klopp, Pirjo Komulainen, Meena Kumari, Claudia Langenberg, Terho Lehtimäki, Shih-Yi Lin, Jaana Lindström, Ruth J F Loos, François Mach, Wendy L McArdle, Christa Meisinger, Braxton D Mitchell, Gabrielle Müller, Ramaiah Nagaraja, Narisu Narisu, Tuomo V M Nieminen, Rebecca N Nsubuga, Isleifur Olafsson, Ken K Ong, Aarno Palotie, Theodore Papamarkou, Cristina Pomilla, Anneli Pouta, Daniel J Rader, Muredach P Reilly, Paul M Ridker, Fernando Rivadeneira, Igor Rudan, Aimo Ruokonen, Nilesh Samani, Hubert Scharnagl, Janet Seeley, Kaisa Silander, Alena Stančáková, Kathleen Stirrups, Amy J Swift, Laurence Tiret, André G Uitterlinden, L Joost van Pelt, Sailaja Vedantam, Nicholas Wainwright, Cisca Wijmenga, Sarah H Wild, Gonneke Willemsen, Tom Wilsgaard, James F Wilson, Elizabeth H Young, Jing Hua Zhao, Linda S Adair, Dominique Arveiler, Themistocles L Assimes, Stefania Bandinelli, Franklyn Bennett, Murielle Bochud, Bernhard O Boehm, Dorret I Boomsma, Ingrid B Borecki, Stefan R Bornstein, Pascal Bovet, Michel Burnier, Harry Campbell, Aravinda Chakravarti, John C Chambers, Yii-Der Ida Chen, Francis S Collins, Richard S Cooper, John Danesh, George Dedoussis, Ulf de Faire, Alan B Feranil, Jean Ferrières, Luigi Ferrucci, Nelson B Freimer, Christian Gieger, Leif C Groop, Vilmundur Gudnason, Ulf Gyllensten, Anders Hamsten, Tamara B Harris, Aroon Hingorani, Joel N Hirschhorn, Albert Hofman, G Kees Hovingh, Chao Agnes Hsiung, Steve E Humphries, Steven C Hunt, Kristian Hveem, Carlos Iribarren, Marjo-Riitta Järvelin, Antti Jula, Mika Kähönen, Jaakko Kaprio, Antero Kesäniemi, Mika Kivimäki, Jaspal S Kooner, Peter J Koudstaal, Ronald M Krauss, Diana Kuh, Johanna Kuusisto, Kirsten O Kyvik, Markku Laakso, Timo A Lakka, Lars Lind, Cecilia M Lindgren, Nicholas G Martin, Winfried März, Mark I McCarthy, Colin A McKenzie, Pierre Meneton, Andres Metspalu, Leena Moilanen, Andrew D Morris, Patricia B Munroe, Inger Njølstad, Nancy L Pedersen, Chris Power, Peter P Pramstaller, Jackie F Price, Bruce M Psaty, Thomas Quertermous, Rainer Rauramaa, Danish Saleheen, Veikko Salomaa, Dharambir K Sanghera, Jouko Saramies, Peter E H Schwarz, Wayne H-H Sheu, Alan R Shuldiner, Agneta Siegbahn, Tim D Spector, Kari Stefansson, David P Strachan, Bamidele O Tayo, Elena Tremoli, Jaakko Tuomilehto, Matti Uusitupa, Cornelia M van Duijn, Peter Vollenweider, Lars Wallentin, Nicholas J Wareham, John B Whitfield, Bruce H R Wolffenbuttel, David Altshuler, José M Ordovás, Eric Boerwinkle, Colin N A Palmer, Unnur Thorsteinsdottir, Daniel I Chasman, Jerome I Rotter, Paul W Franks, Samuli Ripatti, L Adrienne Cupples, Manjinder S Sandhu, Stephen S Rich, Michael Boehnke, Panos Deloukas, Karen L Mohlke, Erik Ingelsson, Gonçalo R Abecasis, Mark J Daly, Benjamin M Neale, Sekar Kathiresan.
Nat. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 02-20-2013
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Triglycerides are transported in plasma by specific triglyceride-rich lipoproteins; in epidemiological studies, increased triglyceride levels correlate with higher risk for coronary artery disease (CAD). However, it is unclear whether this association reflects causal processes. We used 185 common variants recently mapped for plasma lipids (P < 5 × 10(-8) for each) to examine the role of triglycerides in risk for CAD. First, we highlight loci associated with both low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and triglyceride levels, and we show that the direction and magnitude of the associations with both traits are factors in determining CAD risk. Second, we consider loci with only a strong association with triglycerides and show that these loci are also associated with CAD. Finally, in a model accounting for effects on LDL-C and/or high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) levels, the strength of a polymorphisms effect on triglyceride levels is correlated with the magnitude of its effect on CAD risk. These results suggest that triglyceride-rich lipoproteins causally influence risk for CAD.
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Mixed modeling of meta-analysis P-values (MixMAP) suggests multiple novel gene loci for low density lipoprotein cholesterol.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 02-06-2013
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Informing missing heritability for complex disease will likely require leveraging information across multiple SNPs within a gene region simultaneously to characterize gene and locus-level contributions to disease phenotypes. To this aim, we introduce a novel strategy, termed Mixed modeling of Meta-Analysis P-values (MixMAP), that draws on a principled statistical modeling framework and the vast array of summary data now available from genetic association studies, to test formally for locus level association. The primary inputs to this approach are: (a) single SNP level p-values for tests of association; and (b) the mapping of SNPs to genomic regions. The output of MixMAP is comprised of locus level estimates and tests of association. In application of MixMAP to summary data from the Global Lipids Gene Consortium, we suggest twelve new loci (PKN, FN1, UGT1A1, PPARG, DMDGH, PPARD, CDK6, VPS13B, GAD2, GAB2, APOH and NPC1) for low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), a causal risk factor for cardiovascular disease and we also demonstrate the potential utility of MixMAP in small data settings. Overall, MixMAP offers novel and complementary information as compared to SNP-based analysis approaches and is straightforward to implement with existing open-source statistical software tools.
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Fibroblast growth factor 23 is not associated with and does not induce arterial calcification.
Kidney Int.
PUBLISHED: 02-06-2013
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Elevated fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) is associated with cardiovascular disease in patients with chronic kidney disease. As a potential mediating mechanism, FGF23 induces left ventricular hypertrophy; however, its role in arterial calcification is less clear. In order to study this, we quantified coronary artery and thoracic aorta calcium by computed tomography in 1501 patients from the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) study within a median of 376 days (interquartile range 331-420 days) of baseline. Baseline plasma FGF23 was not associated with the prevalence or severity of coronary artery calcium after multivariable adjustment. In contrast, higher serum phosphate levels were associated with prevalence and severity of coronary artery calcium, even after adjustment for FGF23. Neither FGF23 nor serum phosphate were consistently associated with thoracic aorta calcium. We could not detect mRNA expression of FGF23 or its coreceptor, klotho, in human or mouse vascular smooth muscle cells, or normal or calcified mouse aorta. Whereas elevated phosphate concentrations induced calcification in vitro, FGF23 had no effect on phosphate uptake or phosphate-induced calcification regardless of phosphate concentration or even in the presence of soluble klotho. Thus, in contrast to serum phosphate, FGF23 is not associated with arterial calcification and does not promote calcification experimentally. Hence, phosphate and FGF23 promote cardiovascular disease through distinct mechanisms.
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Non-compressible arterial disease and the risk of coronary calcification in type-2 diabetes.
Atherosclerosis
PUBLISHED: 01-28-2013
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Ankle-brachial index (ABI) screening is recommended for the detection of asymptomatic peripheral arterial disease (PAD) in at-risk populations, including diabetics. A low ABI identifies obstructive lower extremity vascular disease and predicts CVD events and increased mortality. A high ABI represents non-compressible arterial disease (NCAD), and is also associated with increased mortality and vascular events. Our objective is to investigate whether low and high ABI have distinct patterns of association with cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors and subclinical atherosclerosis in individuals with type-II diabetes mellitus.
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Race and gender variation in response to evoked inflammation.
J Transl Med
PUBLISHED: 01-13-2013
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Race- and gender-variation in innate immunity may contribute to demographic differences in inflammatory and cardiometabolic disease; yet their influence on dynamic responses during inflammatory stress is poorly understood. Our objective was to examine race and gender influence on the response to experimental endotoxemia.
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Semiparametric odds ratio model for case-control and matched case-control designs.
Stat Med
PUBLISHED: 01-11-2013
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We propose a semiparametric odds ratio model that extends Umbach and Weinbergs approach to exploiting gene-environment association model for efficiency gains in case-control designs to both discrete and continuous data. We directly model the gene-environment association in the control population to avoid estimating the intercept in the disease risk model, which is inherently difficult because of the scarcity of information on the parameter with the sampling designs. We propose a novel permutation-based approach to eliminate the high-dimensional nuisance parameters in the matched case-control design. The proposed approach reduces to the conditional logistic regression when the model for the gene-environment association is unrestricted. Simulation studies demonstrate good performance of the proposed approach. We apply the proposed approach to a study of gene-environment interaction on coronary artery disease.
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Loci influencing blood pressure identified using a cardiovascular gene-centric array.
Santhi K Ganesh, Vinicius Tragante, Wei Guo, Yiran Guo, Matthew B Lanktree, Erin N Smith, Toby Johnson, Berta Almoguera Castillo, John Barnard, Jens Baumert, Yen-Pei Christy Chang, Clara C Elbers, Martin Farrall, Mary E Fischer, Nora Franceschini, Tom R Gaunt, Johannes M I H Gho, Christian Gieger, Yan Gong, Aaron Isaacs, Marcus E Kleber, Irene Mateo Leach, Caitrin W McDonough, Matthijs F L Meijs, Olle Mellander, Cliona M Molony, Ilja M Nolte, Sandosh Padmanabhan, Tom S Price, Ramakrishnan Rajagopalan, Jonathan Shaffer, Sonia Shah, Haiqing Shen, Nicole Soranzo, Peter J van der Most, Erik P A van Iperen, Jessica van Setten, Jessic A Van Setten, Judith M Vonk, Li Zhang, Amber L Beitelshees, Gerald S Berenson, Deepak L Bhatt, Jolanda M A Boer, Eric Boerwinkle, Ben Burkley, Amber Burt, Aravinda Chakravarti, Wei Chen, Rhonda M Cooper-DeHoff, Sean P Curtis, Albert Dreisbach, David Duggan, Georg B Ehret, Richard R Fabsitz, Myriam Fornage, Ervin Fox, Clement E Furlong, Ron T Gansevoort, Marten H Hofker, G Kees Hovingh, Susan A Kirkland, Kandice Kottke-Marchant, Abdullah Kutlar, Andrea Z LaCroix, Taimour Y Langaee, Yun R Li, Honghuang Lin, Kiang Liu, Steffi Maiwald, Rainer Malik, , Gurunathan Murugesan, Christopher Newton-Cheh, Jeffery R O'Connell, N Charlotte Onland-Moret, Willem H Ouwehand, Walter Palmas, Brenda W Penninx, Carl J Pepine, Mary Pettinger, Joseph F Polak, Vasan S Ramachandran, Jane Ranchalis, Susan Redline, Paul M Ridker, Lynda M Rose, Hubert Scharnag, Nicholas J Schork, Daichi Shimbo, Alan R Shuldiner, Sathanur R Srinivasan, Ronald P Stolk, Herman A Taylor, Barbara Thorand, Mieke D Trip, Cornelia M van Duijn, W Monique Verschuren, Cisca Wijmenga, Bernhard R Winkelmann, Sharon Wyatt, J Hunter Young, Bernhard O Boehm, Mark J Caulfield, Daniel I Chasman, Karina W Davidson, Pieter A Doevendans, Garret A FitzGerald, John G Gums, Hakon Hakonarson, Hans L Hillege, Thomas Illig, Gail P Jarvik, Julie A Johnson, John J P Kastelein, Wolfgang Koenig, Winfried März, Braxton D Mitchell, Sarah S Murray, Albertine J Oldehinkel, Daniel J Rader, Muredach P Reilly, Alex P Reiner, Eric E Schadt, Roy L Silverstein, Harold Snieder, Alice V Stanton, André G Uitterlinden, Pim van der Harst, Yvonne T van der Schouw, Nilesh J Samani, Andrew D Johnson, Patricia B Munroe, Paul I W de Bakker, Xiaofeng Zhu, Daniel Levy, Brendan J Keating, Folkert W Asselbergs.
Hum. Mol. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 01-08-2013
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Blood pressure (BP) is a heritable determinant of risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD). To investigate genetic associations with systolic BP (SBP), diastolic BP (DBP), mean arterial pressure (MAP) and pulse pressure (PP), we genotyped ?50 000 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that capture variation in ?2100 candidate genes for cardiovascular phenotypes in 61 619 individuals of European ancestry from cohort studies in the USA and Europe. We identified novel associations between rs347591 and SBP (chromosome 3p25.3, in an intron of HRH1) and between rs2169137 and DBP (chromosome1q32.1 in an intron of MDM4) and between rs2014408 and SBP (chromosome 11p15 in an intron of SOX6), previously reported to be associated with MAP. We also confirmed 10 previously known loci associated with SBP, DBP, MAP or PP (ADRB1, ATP2B1, SH2B3/ATXN2, CSK, CYP17A1, FURIN, HFE, LSP1, MTHFR, SOX6) at array-wide significance (P < 2.4 × 10(-6)). We then replicated these associations in an independent set of 65 886 individuals of European ancestry. The findings from expression QTL (eQTL) analysis showed associations of SNPs in the MDM4 region with MDM4 expression. We did not find any evidence of association of the two novel SNPs in MDM4 and HRH1 with sequelae of high BP including coronary artery disease (CAD), left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) or stroke. In summary, we identified two novel loci associated with BP and confirmed multiple previously reported associations. Our findings extend our understanding of genes involved in BP regulation, some of which may eventually provide new targets for therapeutic intervention.
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Evaluating the impact of sequencing depth on transcriptome profiling in human adipose.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2013
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Recent advances in RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) have enabled the discovery of novel transcriptomic variations that are not possible with traditional microarray-based methods. Tissue and cell specific transcriptome changes during pathophysiological stress in disease cases versus controls and in response to therapies are of particular interest to investigators studying cardiometabolic diseases. Thus, knowledge on the relationships between sequencing depth and detection of transcriptomic variation is needed for designing RNA-Seq experiments and for interpreting results of analyses. Using deeply sequenced Illumina HiSeq 2000 101 bp paired-end RNA-Seq data derived from adipose of a healthy individual before and after systemic administration of endotoxin (LPS), we investigated the sequencing depths needed for studies of gene expression and alternative splicing (AS). In order to detect expressed genes and AS events, we found that ?100 to 150 million (M) filtered reads were needed. However, the requirement on sequencing depth for the detection of LPS modulated differential expression (DE) and differential alternative splicing (DAS) was much higher. To detect 80% of events, ?300 M filtered reads were needed for DE analysis whereas at least 400 M filtered reads were necessary for detecting DAS. Although the majority of expressed genes and AS events can be detected with modest sequencing depths (?100 M filtered reads), the estimated gene expression levels and exon/intron inclusion levels were less accurate. We report the first study that evaluates the relationship between RNA-Seq depth and the ability to detect DE and DAS in human adipose. Our results suggest that a much higher sequencing depth is needed to reliably identify DAS events than for DE genes.
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Ridge regression for longitudinal biomarker data.
Int J Biostat
PUBLISHED: 09-27-2011
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Technological advances facilitating the acquisition of large arrays of biomarker data have led to new opportunities to understand and characterize disease progression over time. This creates an analytical challenge, however, due to the large numbers of potentially informative markers, the high degrees of correlation among them, and the time-dependent trajectories of association. We propose a mixed ridge estimator, which integrates ridge regression into the mixed effects modeling framework in order to account for both the correlation induced by repeatedly measuring an outcome on each individual over time, as well as the potentially high degree of correlation among possible predictor variables. An expectation-maximization algorithm is described to account for unknown variance and covariance parameters. Model performance is demonstrated through a simulation study and an application of the mixed ridge approach to data arising from a study of cardiometabolic biomarker responses to evoked inflammation induced by experimental low-dose endotoxemia.
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Genome-wide association study for serum urate concentrations and gout among African Americans identifies genomic risk loci and a novel URAT1 loss-of-function allele.
Hum. Mol. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 07-18-2011
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Serum urate concentrations are highly heritable and elevated serum urate is a key risk factor for gout. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of serum urate in African American (AA) populations are lacking. We conducted a meta-analysis of GWAS of serum urate levels and gout among 5820 AA and a large candidate gene study among 6890 AA and 21 708 participants of European ancestry (EA) within the Candidate Gene Association Resource Consortium. Findings were tested for replication among 1996 independent AA individuals, and evaluated for their association among 28 283 EA participants of the CHARGE Consortium. Functional studies were conducted using (14)C-urate transport assays in mammalian Chinese hamster ovary cells. In the discovery GWAS of serum urate, three loci achieved genome-wide significance (P< 5.0 × 10(-8)): a novel locus near SGK1/SLC2A12 on chromosome 6 (rs9321453, P= 1.0 × 10(-9)), and two loci previously identified in EA participants, SLC2A9 (P= 3.8 × 10(-32)) and SLC22A12 (P= 2.1 × 10(-10)). A novel rare non-synonymous variant of large effect size in SLC22A12, rs12800450 (minor allele frequency 0.01, G65W), was identified and replicated (beta -1.19 mg/dl, P= 2.7 × 10(-16)). (14)C-urate transport assays showed reduced urate transport for the G65W URAT1 mutant. Finally, in analyses of 11 loci previously associated with serum urate in EA individuals, 10 of 11 lead single-nucleotide polymorphisms showed direction-consistent association with urate among AA. In summary, we identified and replicated one novel locus in association with serum urate levels and experimentally characterize the novel G65W variant in URAT1 as a functional allele. Our data support the importance of multi-ethnic GWAS in the identification of novel risk loci as well as functional variants.
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C-reactive protein modifies the association of plasma leptin with coronary calcium in asymptomatic overweight individuals.
Obesity (Silver Spring)
PUBLISHED: 07-07-2011
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Evidence suggests putative interactions of leptin and C-reactive protein (CRP) in the pathogenesis of adiposity-related atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (CVD). Therefore, we investigated whether CRP levels modify the relationship of leptin levels with coronary artery calcium (CAC). We examined 1,460 asymptomatic individuals from two community-based cross-sectional studies coordinated at a single, university-based research center. We focused on subjects who were overweight or obese (BMI ?25) given greater biologic plausibility in this setting. In multivariable CAC models, we analyzed the interaction of log-transformed plasma leptin levels with higher CRP levels as defined by three cut-points: two clinically based (2 mg/l, 3 mg/l) and one dataset specific (sex-specific upper quartile). The association of plasma leptin with CAC was modified by higher CRP regardless of cut-point (interaction term P values all <0.01 in fully adjusted models). Leptin levels were associated with CAC in those with high, but not low CRP levels (e.g., tobit ratio for a 1 unit increase in ln(leptin) (95% CI): 2.18 (1.29-3.66) if CRP level ?3 mg/l; N = 461 vs. 0.94 (0.67-1.31) if CRP levels <3 mg/l; N = 999) in fully adjusted models. No interaction with CRP was present in control analyses with adiponectin, BMI and waist circumference. In conclusion, in asymptomatic overweight and obese adults, increased leptin levels were independently associated with increased CAC in the presence of high, but not low CRP levels, supporting a leptin-CRP interface in atherosclerosis risk.
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RANTES/CCL5 and risk for coronary events: results from the MONICA/KORA Augsburg case-cohort, Athero-Express and CARDIoGRAM studies.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 06-07-2011
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The chemokine RANTES (regulated on activation, normal T-cell expressed and secreted)/CCL5 is involved in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease in mice, whereas less is known in humans. We hypothesised that its relevance for atherosclerosis should be reflected by associations between CCL5 gene variants, RANTES serum concentrations and protein levels in atherosclerotic plaques and risk for coronary events.
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Prospective study of insulin-like growth factor-I, insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 3, genetic variants in the IGF1 and IGFBP3 genes and risk of coronary artery disease.
Int J Mol Epidemiol Genet
PUBLISHED: 06-02-2011
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Although experimental studies have suggested that insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) and its binding protein IGFBP-3 might have a role in the aetiology of coronary artery disease (CAD), the relevance of circulating IGFs and their binding proteins in the development of CAD in human populations is unclear. We conducted a nested case-control study, with a mean follow-up of six years, within the EPIC-Norfolk cohort to assess the association between circulating levels of IGF-I and IGFBP-3 and risk of CAD in up to 1,013 cases and 2,055 controls matched for age, sex and study enrolment date. After adjustment for cardiovascular risk factors, we found no association between circulating levels of IGF-I or IGFBP-3 and risk of CAD (odds ratio: 0.98 (95% Cl 0.90-1.06) per 1 SD increase in circulating IGF-I; odds ratio: 1.02 (95% Cl 0.94-1.12) for IGFBP-3). We examined associations between tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms (tSNPs) at the IGF1 and IGFBP3 loci and circulating IGF-I and IGFBP-3 levels in up to 1,133 cases and 2,223 controls and identified three tSNPs (rs1520220, rs3730204, rs2132571) that showed independent association with either circulating IGF-I or IGFBP-3 levels. In an assessment of 31 SNPs spanning the IGF1 or IGFBP3 loci, none were associated with risk of CAD in a meta-analysis that included EPIC-Norfolk and eight additional studies comprising up to 9,319 cases and 19,964 controls. Our results indicate that IGF-I and IGFBP-3 are unlikely to be importantly involved in the aetiology of CAD in human populations.
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A genome-wide association study identifies LIPA as a susceptibility gene for coronary artery disease.
Philipp S Wild, Tanja Zeller, Arne Schillert, Silke Szymczak, Christoph R Sinning, Arne Deiseroth, Renate B Schnabel, Edith Lubos, Till Keller, Medea S Eleftheriadis, Christoph Bickel, Hans J Rupprecht, Sandra Wilde, Heidi Rossmann, Patrick Diemert, L Adrienne Cupples, Claire Perret, Jeanette Erdmann, Klaus Stark, Marcus E Kleber, Stephen E Epstein, Benjamin F Voight, Kari Kuulasmaa, Mingyao Li, Arne S Schäfer, Norman Klopp, Peter S Braund, Hendrik B Sager, Serkalem Demissie, Carole Proust, Inke R König, Heinz-Erich Wichmann, Wibke Reinhard, Michael M Hoffmann, Jarmo Virtamo, Mary Susan Burnett, David Siscovick, Per Gunnar Wiklund, Liming Qu, Nour Eddine El Mokthari, John R Thompson, Annette Peters, Albert V Smith, Emmanuelle Yon, Jens Baumert, Christian Hengstenberg, Winfried März, Philippe Amouyel, Joseph Devaney, Stephen M Schwartz, Olli Saarela, Nehal N Mehta, Diana Rubin, Kaisa Silander, Alistair S Hall, Jean Ferrières, Tamara B Harris, Olle Melander, Frank Kee, Hakon Hakonarson, Juergen Schrezenmeir, Vilmundur Gudnason, Roberto Elosua, Dominique Arveiler, Alun Evans, Daniel J Rader, Thomas Illig, Stefan Schreiber, Joshua C Bis, David Altshuler, Maryam Kavousi, Jaqueline C M Witteman, André G Uitterlinden, Albert Hofman, Aaron R Folsom, Maja Barbalic, Eric Boerwinkle, Sekar Kathiresan, Muredach P Reilly, Christopher J O'Donnell, Nilesh J Samani, Heribert Schunkert, Francois Cambien, Karl J Lackner, Laurence Tiret, Veikko Salomaa, Thomas Münzel, Andreas Ziegler, Stefan Blankenberg.
Circ Cardiovasc Genet
PUBLISHED: 05-23-2011
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eQTL analyses are important to improve the understanding of genetic association results. We performed a genome-wide association and global gene expression study to identify functionally relevant variants affecting the risk of coronary artery disease (CAD).
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A second independent locus within DMRT1 is associated with testicular germ cell tumor susceptibility.
Hum. Mol. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 05-06-2011
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Susceptibility to testicular germ cell tumors (TGCT) has a significant heritable component, and genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have identified association with variants in several genes, including KITLG, SPRY4, BAK1, TERT, DMRT1 and ATF7IP. In our GWAS, we genotyped 349 TGCT cases and 919 controls and replicated top hits in an independent set of 439 cases and 960 controls in an attempt to find novel TGCT susceptibility loci. We identified a second marker (rs7040024) in the doublesex and mab-3-related transcription factor 1 (DMRT1) gene that is independent of the previously described risk allele (rs755383) at this locus. In combined analysis that mutually conditions on both DMRT1 single nucleotide polymorphism markers, TGCT cases had elevated odds of carriage of the rs7040024 major A allele [per-allele odds ratio (OR) = 1.48, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.23, 1.78; P = 2.52 × 10(-5)] compared with controls, while the association with rs755383 persisted (per allele OR = 1.26, 95% CI 1.08, 1.47, P = 0.0036). In similar analyses, the association of rs7040024 among men with seminomatous tumors did not differ from that among men with non-seminomatous tumors. In combination with KITLG, the strongest TGCT susceptibility locus found to date, men with TGCT had greatly elevated odds (OR = 14.1, 95% CI 5.12, 38.6; P = 2.98 × 10(-7)) of being double homozygotes for the risk (major) alleles at DMRT (rs7040024) and KITLG (rs4474514) when compared with men without TGCT. Our findings continue to corroborate that genes influencing male germ cell development and differentiation have emerged as the major players in inherited TGCT susceptibility.
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Pathway-Wide Association Study Implicates Multiple Sterol Transport and Metabolism Genes in HDL Cholesterol Regulation.
Front Genet
PUBLISHED: 05-05-2011
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Pathway-based association methods have been proposed to be an effective approach in identifying disease genes, when single-marker association tests do not have sufficient power. The analysis of quantitative traits may be benefited from these approaches, by sampling from two extreme tails of the distribution. Here we tested a pathway association approach on a small genome-wide association study (GWAS) on 653 subjects with extremely high high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) levels and 784 subjects with low HDL-C levels. We identified 102 genes in the sterol transport and metabolism pathways that collectively associate with HDL-C levels, and replicated these association signals in an independent GWAS. Interestingly, the pathways include 18 genes implicated in previous GWAS on lipid traits, suggesting that genuine HDL-C genes are highly enriched in these pathways. Additionally, multiple biologically relevant loci in the pathways were not detected by previous GWAS, including genes implicated in previous candidate gene association studies (such as LEPR, APOA2, HDLBP, SOAT2), genes that cause Mendelian forms of lipid disorders (such as DHCR24), and genes expressing dyslipidemia phenotypes in knockout mice (such as SOAT1, PON1). Our study suggests that sampling from two extreme tails of a quantitative trait and examining genetic pathways may yield biological insights from smaller samples than are generally required using single-marker analysis in large-scale GWAS. Our results also implicate that functionally related genes work together to regulate complex quantitative traits, and that future large-scale studies may benefit from pathway-association approaches to identify novel pathways regulating HDL-C levels.
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Fractalkine is a novel human adipochemokine associated with type 2 diabetes.
Diabetes
PUBLISHED: 04-29-2011
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Leukocyte infiltration of adipose is a critical determinant of obesity-related metabolic diseases. Fractalkine (CX3CL1) and its receptor (CX3CR1) comprise a chemokine system involved in leukocyte recruitment and adhesion in atherosclerosis, but its role in adipose inflammation and type 2 diabetes is unknown.
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Relationship of estimated GFR and coronary artery calcification in the CRIC (Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort) Study.
Am. J. Kidney Dis.
PUBLISHED: 04-26-2011
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Coronary artery calcification (CAC) is associated with increased mortality risk in the general population. Although individuals with chronic kidney disease (CKD) are at markedly increased mortality risk, the incidence, prevalence, and prognosis of CAC in CKD are not well understood.
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Gender differences in the association of C-reactive protein with coronary artery calcium in type-2 diabetes.
Clin. Endocrinol. (Oxf)
PUBLISHED: 04-01-2011
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Plasma C-reactive protein (CRP) is associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD), but effects may vary by gender and degree of CVD risk. Whether CRP has value as a CVD risk marker in type-2 diabetes (T2DM) is unclear. We examined whether CRP has gender differences in association with coronary artery calcium (CAC) in diabetic and nondiabetic samples without clinical CVD.
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The novel atherosclerosis locus at 10q11 regulates plasma CXCL12 levels.
Eur. Heart J.
PUBLISHED: 03-17-2011
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Two single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), rs1746048 and rs501120, from genome wide association studies of coronary artery disease (CAD) map to chromosome 10q11 ?80 kb downstream of chemokine CXCL12. Therefore, we examined the relationship between these two SNPs and plasma CXCL12 levels.
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CUBN is a gene locus for albuminuria.
Carsten A Böger, Ming-Huei Chen, Adrienne Tin, Matthias Olden, Anna Köttgen, Ian H de Boer, Christian Fuchsberger, Conall M O'Seaghdha, Cristian Pattaro, Alexander Teumer, Ching-Ti Liu, Nicole L Glazer, Man Li, Jeffrey R O'Connell, Toshiko Tanaka, Carmen A Peralta, Zoltan Kutalik, Jian'an Luan, Jing Hua Zhao, Shih-Jen Hwang, Ermeg Akylbekova, Holly Kramer, Pim van der Harst, Albert V Smith, Kurt Lohman, Mariza de Andrade, Caroline Hayward, Barbara Kollerits, Anke Tönjes, Thor Aspelund, Erik Ingelsson, Gudny Eiriksdottir, Lenore J Launer, Tamara B Harris, Alan R Shuldiner, Braxton D Mitchell, Dan E Arking, Nora Franceschini, Eric Boerwinkle, Josephine Egan, Dena Hernandez, Muredach Reilly, Raymond R Townsend, Thomas Lumley, David S Siscovick, Bruce M Psaty, Bryan Kestenbaum, Talin Haritunians, Sven Bergmann, Peter Vollenweider, Gérard Waeber, Vincent Mooser, Dawn Waterworth, Andrew D Johnson, Jose C Florez, James B Meigs, Xiaoning Lu, Stephen T Turner, Elizabeth J Atkinson, Tennille S Leak, Knut Aasarød, Frank Skorpen, Ann-Christine Syvänen, Thomas Illig, Jens Baumert, Wolfgang Koenig, Bernhard K Krämer, Olivier Devuyst, Josyf C Mychaleckyj, Cosetta Minelli, Stephan J L Bakker, Lyudmyla Kedenko, Bernhard Paulweber, Stefan Coassin, Karlhans Endlich, Heyo K Kroemer, Reiner Biffar, Sylvia Stracke, Henry Völzke, Michael Stumvoll, Reedik Mägi, Harry Campbell, Veronique Vitart, Nicholas D Hastie, Vilmundur Gudnason, Sharon L R Kardia, Yongmei Liu, Ozren Polašek, Gary Curhan, Florian Kronenberg, Inga Prokopenko, Igor Rudan, Johan Arnlöv, Stein Hallan, Gerjan Navis, , Afshin Parsa, Luigi Ferrucci, Josef Coresh, Michael G Shlipak, Shelley B Bull, Nicholas J Paterson, H-Erich Wichmann, Nicholas J Wareham, Ruth J F Loos, Jerome I Rotter, Peter P Pramstaller, L Adrienne Cupples, Jacques S Beckmann, Qiong Yang, Iris M Heid, Rainer Rettig, Albert W Dreisbach, Murielle Bochud, Caroline S Fox, W H L Kao.
J. Am. Soc. Nephrol.
PUBLISHED: 03-01-2011
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Identification of genetic risk factors for albuminuria may alter strategies for early prevention of CKD progression, particularly among patients with diabetes. Little is known about the influence of common genetic variants on albuminuria in both general and diabetic populations. We performed a meta-analysis of data from 63,153 individuals of European ancestry with genotype information from genome-wide association studies (CKDGen Consortium) and from a large candidate gene study (CARe Consortium) to identify susceptibility loci for the quantitative trait urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio (UACR) and the clinical diagnosis microalbuminuria. We identified an association between a missense variant (I2984V) in the CUBN gene, which encodes cubilin, and both UACR (P = 1.1 × 10(-11)) and microalbuminuria (P = 0.001). We observed similar associations among 6981 African Americans in the CARe Consortium. The associations between this variant and both UACR and microalbuminuria were significant in individuals of European ancestry regardless of diabetes status. Finally, this variant associated with a 41% increased risk for the development of persistent microalbuminuria during 20 years of follow-up among 1304 participants with type 1 diabetes in the prospective DCCT/EDIC Study. In summary, we identified a missense CUBN variant that associates with levels of albuminuria in both the general population and in individuals with diabetes.
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Large-scale association analysis identifies 13 new susceptibility loci for coronary artery disease.
Heribert Schunkert, Inke R König, Sekar Kathiresan, Muredach P Reilly, Themistocles L Assimes, Hilma Holm, Michael Preuss, Alexandre F R Stewart, Maja Barbalic, Christian Gieger, Devin Absher, Zouhair Aherrahrou, Hooman Allayee, David Altshuler, Sonia S Anand, Karl Andersen, Jeffrey L Anderson, Diego Ardissino, Stephen G Ball, Anthony J Balmforth, Timothy A Barnes, Diane M Becker, Lewis C Becker, Klaus Berger, Joshua C Bis, S Matthijs Boekholdt, Eric Boerwinkle, Peter S Braund, Morris J Brown, Mary Susan Burnett, Ian Buysschaert, , John F Carlquist, Li Chen, Sven Cichon, Veryan Codd, Robert W Davies, George Dedoussis, Abbas Dehghan, Serkalem Demissie, Joseph M Devaney, Patrick Diemert, Ron Do, Angela Doering, Sandra Eifert, Nour Eddine El Mokhtari, Stephen G Ellis, Roberto Elosua, James C Engert, Stephen E Epstein, Ulf de Faire, Marcus Fischer, Aaron R Folsom, Jennifer Freyer, Bruna Gigante, Domenico Girelli, Solveig Gretarsdottir, Vilmundur Gudnason, Jeffrey R Gulcher, Eran Halperin, Naomi Hammond, Stanley L Hazen, Albert Hofman, Benjamin D Horne, Thomas Illig, Carlos Iribarren, Gregory T Jones, J Wouter Jukema, Michael A Kaiser, Lee M Kaplan, John J P Kastelein, Kay-Tee Khaw, Joshua W Knowles, Genovefa Kolovou, Augustine Kong, Reijo Laaksonen, Diether Lambrechts, Karin Leander, Guillaume Lettre, Mingyao Li, Wolfgang Lieb, Christina Loley, Andrew J Lotery, Pier M Mannucci, Seraya Maouche, Nicola Martinelli, Pascal P McKeown, Christa Meisinger, Thomas Meitinger, Olle Melander, Pier Angelica Merlini, Vincent Mooser, Thomas Morgan, Thomas W Mühleisen, Joseph B Muhlestein, Thomas Münzel, Kiran Musunuru, Janja Nahrstaedt, Christopher P Nelson, Markus M Nöthen, Oliviero Olivieri, Riyaz S Patel, Chris C Patterson, Annette Peters, Flora Peyvandi, Liming Qu, Arshed A Quyyumi, Daniel J Rader, Loukianos S Rallidis, Catherine Rice, Frits R Rosendaal, Diana Rubin, Veikko Salomaa, M Lourdes Sampietro, Manj S Sandhu, Eric Schadt, Arne Schäfer, Arne Schillert, Stefan Schreiber, Jürgen Schrezenmeir, Stephen M Schwartz, David S Siscovick, Mohan Sivananthan, Suthesh Sivapalaratnam, Albert Smith, Tamara B Smith, Jaapjan D Snoep, Nicole Soranzo, John A Spertus, Klaus Stark, Kathy Stirrups, Monika Stoll, W H Wilson Tang, Stephanie Tennstedt, Gudmundur Thorgeirsson, Gudmar Thorleifsson, Maciej Tomaszewski, André G Uitterlinden, Andre M van Rij, Benjamin F Voight, Nick J Wareham, George A Wells, H-Erich Wichmann, Philipp S Wild, Christina Willenborg, Jaqueline C M Witteman, Benjamin J Wright, Shu Ye, Tanja Zeller, Andreas Ziegler, Francois Cambien, Alison H Goodall, L Adrienne Cupples, Thomas Quertermous, Winfried März, Christian Hengstenberg, Stefan Blankenberg, Willem H Ouwehand, Alistair S Hall, Panos Deloukas, John R Thompson, Kari Stefansson, Robert Roberts, Unnur Thorsteinsdottir, Christopher J O'Donnell, Ruth McPherson, Jeanette Erdmann, Nilesh J Samani.
Nat. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 02-10-2011
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We performed a meta-analysis of 14 genome-wide association studies of coronary artery disease (CAD) comprising 22,233 individuals with CAD (cases) and 64,762 controls of European descent followed by genotyping of top association signals in 56,682 additional individuals. This analysis identified 13 loci newly associated with CAD at P < 5 × 10?? and confirmed the association of 10 of 12 previously reported CAD loci. The 13 new loci showed risk allele frequencies ranging from 0.13 to 0.91 and were associated with a 6% to 17% increase in the risk of CAD per allele. Notably, only three of the new loci showed significant association with traditional CAD risk factors and the majority lie in gene regions not previously implicated in the pathogenesis of CAD. Finally, five of the new CAD risk loci appear to have pleiotropic effects, showing strong association with various other human diseases or traits.
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Emerging diagnostic and therapeutic molecular imaging applications in vascular disease.
Vasc Med
PUBLISHED: 02-10-2011
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Assessment of vascular disease has evolved from mere indirect and direct measurements of luminal stenosis to sophisticated imaging methods to depict millimeter structural changes of the vasculature. In the near future, the emergence of multimodal molecular imaging strategies may enable robust therapeutic and diagnostic (theragnostic) approaches to vascular diseases that comprehensively consider structural, functional, biological and genomic characteristics of the disease in individualized risk assessment, early diagnosis and delivery of targeted interventions.This review presents a summary of recent preclinical and clinical developments in molecular imaging and theragnostic applications covering diverse atherosclerosis events such as endothelial activation, macrophage inflammatory activity, plaque neovascularization and arterial thrombosis. The main focus is on molecular targets designed for imaging platforms commonly used in clinical medicine including magnetic resonance, computed tomography and positron emission tomography. A special emphasis is given to vascular ultrasound applications, considering the important role this imaging platform plays in the clinical and research practice of the vascular medicine specialty.
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Dense genotyping of candidate gene loci identifies variants associated with high-density lipoprotein cholesterol.
Circ Cardiovasc Genet
PUBLISHED: 02-08-2011
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Plasma levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) are known to be heritable, but only a fraction of the heritability is explained. We used a high-density genotyping array containing single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from HDL-C candidate genes selected on known biology of HDL-C metabolism, mouse genetic studies, and human genetic association studies. SNP selection was based on tagging SNPs and included low-frequency nonsynonymous SNPs.
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Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies from the CHARGE consortium identifies common variants associated with carotid intima media thickness and plaque.
Joshua C Bis, Maryam Kavousi, Nora Franceschini, Aaron Isaacs, Gonçalo R Abecasis, Ulf Schminke, Wendy S Post, Albert V Smith, L Adrienne Cupples, Hugh S Markus, Reinhold Schmidt, Jennifer E Huffman, Terho Lehtimäki, Jens Baumert, Thomas Münzel, Susan R Heckbert, Abbas Dehghan, Kari North, Ben Oostra, Steve Bevan, Eva-Maria Stoegerer, Caroline Hayward, Olli Raitakari, Christa Meisinger, Arne Schillert, Serena Sanna, Henry Völzke, Yu-Ching Cheng, Bolli Thorsson, Caroline S Fox, Kenneth Rice, Fernando Rivadeneira, Vijay Nambi, Eran Halperin, Katja E Petrovic, Leena Peltonen, H Erich Wichmann, Renate B Schnabel, Marcus Dörr, Afshin Parsa, Thor Aspelund, Serkalem Demissie, Sekar Kathiresan, Muredach P Reilly, Kent Taylor, André Uitterlinden, David J Couper, Matthias Sitzer, Mika Kähönen, Thomas Illig, Philipp S Wild, Marco Orrù, Jan Lüdemann, Alan R Shuldiner, Gudny Eiriksdottir, Charles C White, Jerome I Rotter, Albert Hofman, Jochen Seissler, Tanja Zeller, Gianluca Usala, Florian Ernst, Lenore J Launer, Ralph B D'Agostino, Daniel H O'Leary, Christie Ballantyne, Joachim Thiery, Andreas Ziegler, Edward G Lakatta, Ravi Kumar Chilukoti, Tamara B Harris, Philip A Wolf, Bruce M Psaty, Joseph F Polak, Xia Li, Wolfgang Rathmann, Manuela Uda, Eric Boerwinkle, Norman Klopp, Helena Schmidt, James F Wilson, Jorma Viikari, Wolfgang Koenig, Stefan Blankenberg, Anne B Newman, Jacqueline Witteman, Gerardo Heiss, Cornelia van Duijn, Angelo Scuteri, Georg Homuth, Braxton D Mitchell, Vilmundur Gudnason, Christopher J O'Donnell, .
Nat. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 02-02-2011
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Carotid intima media thickness (cIMT) and plaque determined by ultrasonography are established measures of subclinical atherosclerosis that each predicts future cardiovascular disease events. We conducted a meta-analysis of genome-wide association data in 31,211 participants of European ancestry from nine large studies in the setting of the Cohorts for Heart and Aging Research in Genomic Epidemiology (CHARGE) Consortium. We then sought additional evidence to support our findings among 11,273 individuals using data from seven additional studies. In the combined meta-analysis, we identified three genomic regions associated with common carotid intima media thickness and two different regions associated with the presence of carotid plaque (P < 5 × 10(-8)). The associated SNPs mapped in or near genes related to cellular signaling, lipid metabolism and blood pressure homeostasis, and two of the regions were associated with coronary artery disease (P < 0.006) in the Coronary Artery Disease Genome-Wide Replication and Meta-Analysis (CARDIoGRAM) consortium. Our findings may provide new insight into pathways leading to subclinical atherosclerosis and subsequent cardiovascular events.
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Genetic association for renal traits among participants of African ancestry reveals new loci for renal function.
PLoS Genet.
PUBLISHED: 01-31-2011
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Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is an increasing global public health concern, particularly among populations of African ancestry. We performed an interrogation of known renal loci, genome-wide association (GWA), and IBC candidate-gene SNP association analyses in African Americans from the CARe Renal Consortium. In up to 8,110 participants, we performed meta-analyses of GWA and IBC array data for estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), CKD (eGFR <60 mL/min/1.73 m(2)), urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio (UACR), and microalbuminuria (UACR >30 mg/g) and interrogated the 250 kb flanking region around 24 SNPs previously identified in European Ancestry renal GWAS analyses. Findings were replicated in up to 4,358 African Americans. To assess function, individually identified genes were knocked down in zebrafish embryos by morpholino antisense oligonucleotides. Expression of kidney-specific genes was assessed by in situ hybridization, and glomerular filtration was evaluated by dextran clearance. Overall, 23 of 24 previously identified SNPs had direction-consistent associations with eGFR in African Americans, 2 of which achieved nominal significance (UMOD, PIP5K1B). Interrogation of the flanking regions uncovered 24 new index SNPs in African Americans, 12 of which were replicated (UMOD, ANXA9, GCKR, TFDP2, DAB2, VEGFA, ATXN2, GATM, SLC22A2, TMEM60, SLC6A13, and BCAS3). In addition, we identified 3 suggestive loci at DOK6 (p-value?=?5.3×10(-7)) and FNDC1 (p-value?=?3.0×10(-7)) for UACR, and KCNQ1 with eGFR (p?=?3.6×10(-6)). Morpholino knockdown of kcnq1 in the zebrafish resulted in abnormal kidney development and filtration capacity. We identified several SNPs in association with eGFR in African Ancestry individuals, as well as 3 suggestive loci for UACR and eGFR. Functional genetic studies support a role for kcnq1 in glomerular development in zebrafish.
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Usefulness of insulin resistance estimation and the metabolic syndrome in predicting coronary atherosclerosis in type 2 diabetes mellitus.
Am. J. Cardiol.
PUBLISHED: 01-25-2011
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Metabolic syndrome (MS) definitions predict cardiovascular events beyond traditional risk factors in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) as well as subjects without DM. It has been shown that apolipoprotein B (apoB) and non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol are associated with coronary artery calcification in DM. However, the relative value of MS, apoB lipoproteins, and estimates of insulin resistance is unknown in predicting atherosclerosis in DM. Cross-sectional analyses of white subjects in 2 community-based studies were performed (n = 611 patients with DM, n = 803 subjects without DM) using multivariate analysis of traditional risk factors and then adding MS, apoB, and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR). Incremental value was tested using likelihood ratio testing. Beyond traditional risk, HOMA-IR (tobit regression ratio 1.86, p = 0.002), apoB (tobit regression ratio 1.55, p = 0.001), and MS (tobit regression ratio 2.37, p = 0.007) were independently associated with coronary artery calcification in DM. In nested models, HOMA-IR added value to apoB (tobit regression ratio 1.72, p = 0.008), MS (tobit regression ratio 1.72, p = 0.011), and apoB and MS (tobit regression ratio 1.64, p = 0.021). ApoB showed a similar pattern when added to HOMA-IR (tobit regression ratio 1.51, p = 0.004), MS (tobit regression ratio 1.46, p = 0.005), and HOMA-IR and MS (tobit regression ratio 1.48, p = 0.006). MS added to apoB (tobit regression ratio 1.99, p = 0.032) but not HOMA-IR (tobit regression ratio 1.54, p = 0.221) or apoB and HOMA-IR (tobit regression ratio 1.32, p = 0.434). In conclusion, insulin resistance estimates add value to MS and apoB in predicting coronary artery calcification scores in DM and warrant further evaluation in clinic for identification of patients with DM at higher risk for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease.
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Comparison of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol to apolipoprotein A-I and A-II to predict coronary calcium and the effect of insulin resistance.
Am. J. Cardiol.
PUBLISHED: 01-25-2011
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High-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol and its apolipoproteins each capture unique lipid and cardiometabolic information important to risk quantification. It was hypothesized that metabolic factors, including insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes, would confound the association of HDL cholesterol with coronary artery calcification (CAC) and that apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) and/or apolipoprotein A-II (apoA-II) would add to HDL cholesterol in predicting CAC. Two community-based cross-sectional studies of white subjects were analyzed: the Penn Diabetes Heart Study (PDHS; n = 611 subjects with type 2 diabetes, 71.4% men) and the Study of Inherited Risk of Coronary Atherosclerosis (SIRCA; n = 803 subjects without diabetes, 52.8% men) using multivariable analysis of apoA-I, apoA-II, and HDL cholesterol stratified by diabetes status. HDL cholesterol was inversely associated with CAC after adjusting for age and gender in whites with type 2 diabetes (tobit ratio for a 1-SD increase in HDL cholesterol 0.58, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.44 to 0.77, p <0.001) as well as those without diabetes (tobit ratio 0.72, 95% CI 0.59 to 0.88, p = 0.001). In contrast, apoA-I was a weaker predictor in subjects with (tobit ratio 0.64, 95% CI 0.45 to 0.90, p = 0.010) and without (tobit ratio 0.79, 95% CI 0.66 to 0.94, p = 0.010) diabetes, while apoA-II had no association with CAC. Control for metabolic variables, including triglycerides, waist circumference, and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance, attenuated these relations, particularly in subjects without diabetes. In likelihood ratio test analyses, HDL cholesterol added to apoA-I, apoA-II, and atherogenic apolipoprotein B lipoproteins but improved CAC prediction over metabolic factors only in subjects with diabetes. In conclusion, HDL cholesterol outperformed apoA-I and apoA-II in CAC prediction, but its association with CAC was attenuated by measures of insulin resistance.
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Loss-of-function DNA sequence variant in the CLCNKA chloride channel implicates the cardio-renal axis in interindividual heart failure risk variation.
Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A.
PUBLISHED: 01-19-2011
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Common heart failure has a strong undefined heritable component. Two recent independent cardiovascular SNP array studies identified a common SNP at 1p36 in intron 2 of the HSPB7 gene as being associated with heart failure. HSPB7 resequencing identified other risk alleles but no functional gene variants. Here, we further show no effect of the HSPB7 SNP on cardiac HSPB7 mRNA levels or splicing, suggesting that the SNP marks the position of a functional variant in another gene. Accordingly, we used massively parallel platforms to resequence all coding exons of the adjacent CLCNKA gene, which encodes the K(a) renal chloride channel (ClC-K(a)). Of 51 exonic CLCNKA variants identified, one SNP (rs10927887, encoding Arg83Gly) was common, in linkage disequilibrium with the heart failure risk SNP in HSPB7, and associated with heart failure in two independent Caucasian referral populations (n = 2,606 and 1,168; combined P = 2.25 × 10(-6)). Individual genotyping of rs10927887 in the two study populations and a third independent heart failure cohort (combined n = 5,489) revealed an additive allele effect on heart failure risk that is independent of age, sex, and prior hypertension (odds ratio = 1.27 per allele copy; P = 8.3 × 10(-7)). Functional characterization of recombinant wild-type Arg83 and variant Gly83 ClC-K(a) chloride channel currents revealed ? 50% loss-of-function of the variant channel. These findings identify a common, functionally significant genetic risk factor for Caucasian heart failure. The variant CLCNKA risk allele, telegraphed by linked variants in the adjacent HSPB7 gene, uncovers a previously overlooked genetic mechanism affecting the cardio-renal axis.
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Metabolic syndrome, components, and cardiovascular disease prevalence in chronic kidney disease: findings from the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) Study.
Am. J. Nephrol.
PUBLISHED: 01-14-2011
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Metabolic syndrome may increase the risk for incident cardiovascular disease (CVD) and all-cause mortality in the general population. It is unclear whether, and to what degree, metabolic syndrome is associated with CVD in chronic kidney disease (CKD). We determined metabolic syndrome prevalence among individuals with a broad spectrum of kidney dysfunction, examining the role of the individual elements of metabolic syndrome and their relationship to prevalent CVD.
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Genome-wide association study of coronary heart disease and its risk factors in 8,090 African Americans: the NHLBI CARe Project.
PLoS Genet.
PUBLISHED: 01-07-2011
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Coronary heart disease (CHD) is the leading cause of mortality in African Americans. To identify common genetic polymorphisms associated with CHD and its risk factors (LDL- and HDL-cholesterol (LDL-C and HDL-C), hypertension, smoking, and type-2 diabetes) in individuals of African ancestry, we performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) in 8,090 African Americans from five population-based cohorts. We replicated 17 loci previously associated with CHD or its risk factors in Caucasians. For five of these regions (CHD: CDKN2A/CDKN2B; HDL-C: FADS1-3, PLTP, LPL, and ABCA1), we could leverage the distinct linkage disequilibrium (LD) patterns in African Americans to identify DNA polymorphisms more strongly associated with the phenotypes than the previously reported index SNPs found in Caucasian populations. We also developed a new approach for association testing in admixed populations that uses allelic and local ancestry variation. Using this method, we discovered several loci that would have been missed using the basic allelic and global ancestry information only. Our conclusions suggest that no major loci uniquely explain the high prevalence of CHD in African Americans. Our project has developed resources and methods that address both admixture- and SNP-association to maximize power for genetic discovery in even larger African-American consortia.
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Design of the Coronary ARtery DIsease Genome-Wide Replication And Meta-Analysis (CARDIoGRAM) Study: A Genome-wide association meta-analysis involving more than 22 000 cases and 60 000 controls.
Circ Cardiovasc Genet
PUBLISHED: 10-05-2010
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Recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of myocardial infarction (MI) and other forms of coronary artery disease (CAD) have led to the discovery of at least 13 genetic loci. In addition to the effect size, power to detect associations is largely driven by sample size. Therefore, to maximize the chance of finding novel susceptibility loci for CAD and MI, the Coronary ARtery DIsease Genome-wide Replication And Meta-analysis (CARDIoGRAM) consortium was formed.
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JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

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In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.