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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Mutation and mutation rates at Y chromosome specific Short Tandem Repeat Polymorphisms (STRs): a reappraisal.
Forensic Sci Int Genet
PUBLISHED: 02-18-2014
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Mutation is a topic of intense research and raises important problems in forensics. Since the markers of choice in current forensic genetics analyses are microsatellites or Short Tandem Repeat Polymorphisms (STRs), mutation is sufficiently common to cause difficulties in evaluating DNA evidence in a significant proportion of cases but at the same time rare enough to turn the estimation of the corresponding probability of occurrence into a hard task. We address these issues using the simplest model of transmission: the Y chromosome specific STRs. Within this model, and under an explicit set of definitions and involved assumptions, we developed the theoretical framework required for the study of allelic transitions in gametogenesis, identifying the required parameters and associated probabilities and finally we discuss the estimation of these parameters and their application in forensics. We conclude that (i) for forensic casework the relevant parameter for incorporation in a likelihood ratio is biallelic specific (i.e. the mutation rate estimate corresponds to the probability of the specific allelic transition observed) and (ii) for these estimates as well as in order to provide data for testing mutation models the absolute frequency of mutated and non-mutated transmissions per allele, along with the description of the observed mutations should be reported.
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A general approach to power calculation for relationship testing.
Forensic Sci Int Genet
PUBLISHED: 04-02-2013
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This paper is motivated by power considerations in connection with relationship testing. Given the true relationship between a set of individuals, a claimed relationship between the same individuals, and a set of genetic markers, we compute the power of exclusion, i.e., the probability that the genotypes will be incompatible with the claimed relationship. If exclusion is impossible, as will be the case if it is required for instance to distinguish between sibs and half sibs, we rather obtain the distribution of the likelihood ratio. The problem we are addressing can also be seen as a standard way of measuring the ability of a battery of tests to resolve claimed family relationships. In particular, simple exclusion probabilities are regularly calculated worldwide as a part of designing forensic marker sets. Our approach to these problems is guided by a natural way of calculating exclusion probabilities on a computer. We present a user friendly implementation for this as part of the R package paramlink, originally designed by one of the authors (MDV) for pedigree manipulations and likelihood computations. By doing so we are able to handle problems more challenging than we have seen in the literature. Specifically, we deal with complex pedigrees with arbitrary inbreeding and conditioning. We present examples for autosomal as well as X-linked markers and some formulae to validate the results. The examples indicate a wide range of applications. Details are presented for an immigration case where previously reported calculations are extended to account for possible inbreeding and known genotypes. The supplementary material includes a tutorial on how to perform these calculations in paramlink.
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Leukotoxicity of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans in generalized aggressive periodontitis in Brazilians and their family members.
J Appl Oral Sci
PUBLISHED: 03-23-2013
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The purpose of this study was to examine the leukotoxin promoter types of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans clones in subjects with generalized aggressive periodontitis (GAgP) and in their family members (FM).
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Paternity exclusion power: comparative behaviour of autosomal and X-chromosomal markers in standard and deficient cases with inbreeding.
Forensic Sci Int Genet
PUBLISHED: 01-09-2013
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In paternity testing the informativeness of genetic markers is traditionally measured through the probability of finding, in randomly chosen individuals, inconsistencies with parent to child Mendelian rules of transmission. This statistic, called power of exclusion (PE), paternal exclusion chance or probability, can be defined for duos (mother not typed) or trios (random false fathers are matched against mother/child pairs) and performed both for autosomal and X-chromosomal markers (restricted to paternity testing involving daughters). PE is an a priori statistic, in the sense of not depending on the individuals genetic data of a case, being dependent however on the estimates of genetic markers allele (or haplotype) frequencies. We have studied the behaviour of this statistic in situations where the randomness assumption is not met, because either (a) the alleged - and false - father is related to the true one, or (b) there is a non-negligible level of background relatedness in the population. For the first case, we derived general (autosomal and X-chromosomal) PE formulas for duos and trios for any genealogy linking alleged father and child, highlighting that the PE of each marker only depends on a single kinship parameter associated with their pedigree. In this case we also estimate a lower bound for the number of extra markers needed to be analysed to achieve the same global power as for unrelated individuals. In the second situation, we demonstrate that for realistic values of the coancestry coefficient the decrease in PE due to population inbreeding is very moderate even when duos are analysed. In this work, beyond the aforementioned issues, we also discuss the suitability of assuming the pedigree father-daughter for calculating the X-PE, since X-markers are not the tool of choice in laboratorial routine when the alleged father is available for testing. Indeed, X-markers are particularly useful in situations where the alleged father is not available for testing but experts are able to type the mother or a daughter of his. Such increase of power is due to the paternal genealogies: half- and full-sisters, and grandmother-granddaughter, having a non-null X-PE even when only duos are analysed in contrast to what happens for autosomes. Algebraic expressions for these cases are also presented.
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A general method to assess the utility of the X-chromosomal markers in kinship testing.
Forensic Sci Int Genet
PUBLISHED: 03-25-2011
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In studies involving pedigree reconstruction and kinship estimation, it is acknowledged that some pedigrees have the same algebraic expressions for the joint genotypic probabilities and are, therefore, indistinguishable when considering only genetic information, no matter what the mode of transmission considered. Indeed, although standard forensic practice considers solely unlinked autosomal markers, the existence of pedigrees with the referred theoretical property (that are then said to belong to the same kinship class) is possible when considering any kind of genetic transmission. The research on genetic relatedness has always been linked to the root concept of identity-by-descent (IBD). However, although the basic theoretical core for autosomal transmission has been long formalised, a general method allowing the decision if two pedigrees linking two non-inbred individuals are distinguishable using unlinked autosomal markers along with the respective IBD partitions (and consequently the algebraic expressions for the joint genotypic probabilities) was only recently published. In this work X-chromosomal transmission will be at stake, considering that the analytical framework for X-chromosomal markers has been recently established and the importance of X-chromosome markers for these questions has been steadily growing, particularly in forensics, as a tool both to complement the information given by autosomes in complex kinship testing cases and to differentiate pedigrees belonging to the same autosomal kinship class. Therefore, here it will be presented a formal and mathematically well supported framework where a general counting rule is given, allowing a secure and expeditious decision on the usefulness of typing (unlinked) X-chromosomal markers on pairwise kinship testing involving two non-inbred individuals. Moreover the counting rule now presented allows the derivation of algebraic expressions for the joint genotypic probabilities associated with any pedigree.
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Identification of species by multiplex analysis of variable-length sequences.
Nucleic Acids Res.
PUBLISHED: 10-04-2010
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The quest for a universal and efficient method of identifying species has been a longstanding challenge in biology. Here, we show that accurate identification of species in all domains of life can be accomplished by multiplex analysis of variable-length sequences containing multiple insertion/deletion variants. The new method, called SPInDel, is able to discriminate 93.3% of eukaryotic species from 18 taxonomic groups. We also demonstrate that the identification of prokaryotic and viral species with numeric profiles of fragment lengths is generally straightforward. A computational platform is presented to facilitate the planning of projects and includes a large data set with nearly 1800 numeric profiles for species in all domains of life (1556 for eukaryotes, 105 for prokaryotes and 130 for viruses). Finally, a SPInDel profiling kit for discrimination of 10 mammalian species was successfully validated on highly processed food products with species mixtures and proved to be easily adaptable to multiple screening procedures routinely used in molecular biology laboratories. These results suggest that SPInDel is a reliable and cost-effective method for broad-spectrum species identification that is appropriate for use in suboptimal samples and is amenable to different high-throughput genotyping platforms without the need for DNA sequencing.
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General derivation of the sets of pedigrees with the same kinship coefficients.
Hum. Hered.
PUBLISHED: 04-06-2010
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Quantification of kinships between two individuals using unlinked autosomal markers rests upon the identity-by-descent (IBD) probabilities among their four alleles at a locus because they determine the algebraic expressions of the joint genotypic probabilities. Nevertheless, some pedigrees share the same IBD probabilities and are therefore indistinguishable using those markers. Examples of these pedigrees were previously described, such as the case of half-siblings, grandparent-grandchild and avuncular, but a general analysis has not been attempted. The aim of this study is to present a systematic and mathematically supported framework where considering unlinked autosomal markers complete sets of indistinguishable pedigrees linking two non-inbred individuals are generally derived. In our work, complete sets of pedigrees with the same IBD partitions are formally established and mathematically treated, considering kinships linking any pair of non-inbred individuals, whether they are related just maternally or paternally, or both. Moreover, general expressions for IBD partitions, and consequently for joint genotypic probabilities, are derived considering a simple counting rule based on two atom pedigrees: parent-child and full-siblings. Besides the theoretical formalization of the problem, the developed framework has potential applications in forensics as well as in breeding strategies design and in conservation studies.
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X-chromosome markers in kinship testing: a generalisation of the IBD approach identifying situations where their contribution is crucial.
Forensic Sci Int Genet
PUBLISHED: 01-15-2010
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The standard practice of forensic kinship evaluation uses unlinked autosomal markers. However, X-chromosome markers have recently gained recognition as a powerful tool to complement the information provided by autosomes, particularly in complex cases. In this paper, the X-chromosome mode of transmission is addressed in the theoretical identity-by-descent framework. Formulas for the joint genotypic probabilities considering various pedigrees relating two inbred and/or non-inbred individuals are derived. Finally, the importance of X-chromosome markers is highlighted by the fact that, in addition to complementing the autosomal information, X-chromosome transmission allows differential weighting of certain hypotheses regarding pedigrees belonging to the same autosomal class, i.e., pedigrees that are indistinguishable by the use of unlinked autosomal markers. Illustrative examples of common kinship testing are shown.
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The Karimojong from Uganda: genetic characterization using an X-STR decaplex system.
Forensic Sci Int Genet
PUBLISHED: 08-04-2009
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The Karimojong, an African group from the Karamoja region of Northeast Uganda, were genetically analysed using a decaplex system for X chromosome short tandem repeats (X-STRs). A total of 255 individuals (117 males and 138 females) were genotyped for the following loci: DXS8378, DXS9898, DXS7133, GATA31E08, GATA172D05, DXS7423, DXS6809, DXS7132, DXS9902 and DXS6789. Allele frequencies and parameters for forensic evaluation were calculated for each STR. No association was found between any pairs of loci studied. DXS6789 was the most polymorphic marker in this sample, followed by DXS6809, with gene diversities of 84.79% and 83.94%, respectively. The less discriminating locus observed was DXS7133, with a gene diversity of 39.79%. High overall values of power of discrimination were obtained for female (1 in 1.8 x 10(10)) and male samples (1 in 1.6 x 10(6)), as well as high power of exclusion in father/mother/daughter trios (99.9997%), in father daughter duos (99.9862%) and in half sisters with same father (99.0331%). These results confirm the potential of this 10-plex in parentage testing and in human identification.
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Antibacterial and antiparasitic effects of Bothrops marajoensis venom and its fractions: Phospholipase A2 and L-amino acid oxidase.
Toxicon
PUBLISHED: 06-08-2009
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Some proteins present in snake venom possess enzymatic activities, such as phospholipase A(2) and l-amino acid oxidase. In this study, we verify the action of the Bothrops marajoensis venom (BmarTV), PLA(2) (BmarPLA(2)) and LAAO (BmarLAAO) on strains of bacteria, yeast, and Leishmania sp. The BmarTV was isolated by Protein Pack 5PW, and several fractions were obtained. Reverse phase HPLC showed that BmarPLA(2) was isolated from the venom, and N-terminal amino acid sequencing of sPLA(2) showed high amino acid identity with other lysine K49 sPLA(2)s isolated from Bothrops snakes. The BmarLAAO was purified to high molecular homogeneity and its N-terminal amino acid sequence demonstrated a high degree of amino acid conservation with others LAAOs. BmarLAAO was able to inhibit the growth of P. aeruginosa, C. albicans and S. aureus in a dose-dependent manner. The inhibitory effect was more significant on S. aureus, with a MIC=50 microg/mL and MLC=200 microg/mL. However, the BmarTV and BmarPLA(2) did not demonstrate inhibitory capacity. BmarLAAO was able to inhibit the growth of promastigote forms of L. chagasi and L. amazonensis, with an IC(50)=2.55 microg/mL and 2.86 microg/mL for L. amazonensis and L. chagasi, respectively. BmarTV also provided significant inhibition of parasitic growth, with an IC(50) of 86.56 microg/mL for L. amazonensis and 79.02 microg/mL for L. chagasi. BmarPLA(2) did not promote any inhibition of the growth of these parasites. The BmarLAAO and BmarTV presented low toxicity at the concentrations studied. In conclusion, whole venom as well as the l-amino acid oxidase from Bothrops marajoensis was able to inhibit the growth of several microorganisms, including S. aureus, Candida albicans, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Leishmania sp.
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Comparative evaluation of alternative batteries of genetic markers to complement autosomal STRs in kinship investigations: autosomal indels vs. X-chromosome STRs.
Int. J. Legal Med.
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Kinship investigations such as paternity are currently solved using sets of (commercially available) highly polymorphic autosomal short tandem repeats (STRs), which lead to powerful likelihood ratios (LR). Still, some difficult cases arise whenever the kinship is much more remote or if the alternative hypotheses are not correctly formulated due to the lack of information (for e.g. there is an unknown relationship between the alleged and the true fathers). In these situations, beyond the routinely used marker set, laboratories usually enlarge the number and/or the type of markers analysed. Among these, autosomal indels and X-chromosome STRs have gained popularity. The aim of this study was to compare the results obtained after complementing an initial set of autosomal STRs with indels or with X-chromosome-specific STRs in simulated paternity cases where the alleged father is a close relative of the real one. Results show that in paternity cases where a low number of incompatibilities are observed, the best strategy is to increase the number of autosomal STRs under analysis. Nevertheless, if these are not available, our study globally shows that in father-daughter duos, a set of 12 X-STRs is more advantageous than 38 highly diverse autosomal biallelic markers. Additionally, the usefulness of X-STRs was also evaluated in cases where only a close relative of the alleged parent (father or mother) is available for testing. For those situations where these markers have the power to exclude, strong LR values are obtained. In the remaining cases, LRs are usually weak and sometimes the results are more likely under the wrong kinship hypothesis.
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Assessing paternities with inconclusive STR results: The suitability of bi-allelic markers.
Forensic Sci Int Genet
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In paternity testing the genetic profiles of the individuals are used to compare the relative likelihoods of the alleged father and the child being related as father/offspring against, usually, being unrelated. In the great majority of the cases, analyses with the widely used sets of short tandem repeat markers (STRs) provide powerful statistical evidence favouring one of the alternative hypotheses. Nevertheless, there are situations where the final statistical result is ambiguous, mostly because the alleged father shows incompatible genotypes at a few loci along with a very high paternity index in the remaining systems. In these cases, the possibility that the alleged father is actually a close relative of the real one (son, father or brother) can reasonably be raised. In such cases, when the statistical evidence obtained is considered as insufficient, the common practice is to extend the set of analysed markers. In this context, many authors have suggested that bi-allelic markers, such as single nucleotide (SNP) or insertion/deletion (Indel) polymorphisms, are markers of choice, as they are incomparably less prone to mutation than STRs. In this work we address the soundness of this claim and the consequences of this strategy, analyzing the a priori odds both for (a) expected number of Mendelian incompatibilities, and (b) expected values for the final likelihood ratios. Moreover, one hundred real pairs of second degree relatives, typed for two sets of markers: 15 STRs plus 38 Indels, were used to simulate paternity testing. Our data show that, for the number of markers commonly considered, the results from an extended battery of SNPs or Indels should be interpreted with caution when relatives are possibly involved.
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Straightforward inference of ancestry and admixture proportions through ancestry-informative insertion deletion multiplexing.
PLoS ONE
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Ancestry-informative markers (AIMs) show high allele frequency divergence between different ancestral or geographically distant populations. These genetic markers are especially useful in inferring the likely ancestral origin of an individual or estimating the apportionment of ancestry components in admixed individuals or populations. The study of AIMs is of great interest in clinical genetics research, particularly to detect and correct for population substructure effects in case-control association studies, but also in population and forensic genetics studies. This work presents a set of 46 ancestry-informative insertion deletion polymorphisms selected to efficiently measure population admixture proportions of four different origins (African, European, East Asian and Native American). All markers are analyzed in short fragments (under 230 basepairs) through a single PCR followed by capillary electrophoresis (CE) allowing a very simple one tube PCR-to-CE approach. HGDP-CEPH diversity panel samples from the four groups, together with Oceanians, were genotyped to evaluate the efficiency of the assay in clustering populations from different continental origins and to establish reference databases. In addition, other populations from diverse geographic origins were tested using the HGDP-CEPH samples as reference data. The results revealed that the AIM-INDEL set developed is highly efficient at inferring the ancestry of individuals and provides good estimates of ancestry proportions at the population level. In conclusion, we have optimized the multiplexed genotyping of 46 AIM-INDELs in a simple and informative assay, enabling a more straightforward alternative to the commonly available AIM-SNP typing methods dependent on complex, multi-step protocols or implementation of large-scale genotyping technologies.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

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We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

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In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.