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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Effects of Ultraprotective Ventilation, Extracorporeal Carbon Dioxide Removal, and Spontaneous Breathing on Lung Morphofunction and Inflammation in Experimental Severe Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome.
Anesthesiology
PUBLISHED: 11-06-2014
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To investigate the role of ultraprotective mechanical ventilation (UP-MV) and extracorporeal carbon dioxide removal with and without spontaneous breathing (SB) to improve respiratory function and lung protection in experimental severe acute respiratory distress syndrome.
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Higher levels of spontaneous breathing reduce lung injury in experimental moderate acute respiratory distress syndrome*.
Crit. Care Med.
PUBLISHED: 08-28-2014
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To assess the effects of different levels of spontaneous breathing during biphasic positive airway pressure/airway pressure release ventilation on lung function and injury in an experimental model of moderate acute respiratory distress syndrome.
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Low-frequency heart rate variability is related to the breath-to-breath variability in the respiratory pattern.
Psychophysiology
PUBLISHED: 01-16-2014
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Changes in heart rate variability (HRV) at "respiratory" frequencies (0.15-0.5?Hz) may result from changes in respiration rather than autonomic control. We now investigate if the differences in HRV power in the low-frequency (LF) band (0.05-0.15?Hz, HRV(LF)) can also be predicted by respiration variability, quantified by the fraction of tidal volume power in the LF (V(LF,n)). Three experimental protocols were considered: paced breathing, mental effort tasks, and a repeated attentional task. Significant intra- and interindividual correlations were found between changes in HRV(LF) and V(LF,n) despite all subjects having a respiratory frequency above the LF band. Respiratory parameters (respiratory period, tidal volume, and V(LF,n)) could predict up to 79% of HRV(LF) differences in some cases. This suggests that respiratory variability is another mechanism of HRV(LF) generation, which should be always monitored, assessed, and considered in the interpretation of HRV changes.
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Higher levels of spontaneous breathing induce lung recruitment and reduce global stress/strain in experimental lung injury.
Anesthesiology
PUBLISHED: 01-11-2014
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Spontaneous breathing (SB) in the early phase of the acute respiratory distress syndrome is controversial. Biphasic positive airway pressure/airway pressure release ventilation (BIPAP/APRV) is commonly used, but the level of SB necessary to maximize potential beneficial effects is unknown.
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Liquid- and air-filled catheters without balloon as an alternative to the air-filled balloon catheter for measurement of esophageal pressure.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2014
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Measuring esophageal pressure (Pes) using an air-filled balloon catheter (BC) is the common approach to estimate pleural pressure and related parameters. However, Pes is not routinely measured in mechanically ventilated patients, partly due to technical and practical limitations and difficulties. This study aimed at comparing the conventional BC with two alternative methods for Pes measurement, liquid-filled and air-filled catheters without balloon (LFC and AFC), during mechanical ventilation with and without spontaneous breathing activity. Seven female juvenile pigs (32-42 kg) were anesthetized, orotracheally intubated, and a bundle of an AFC, LFC, and BC was inserted in the esophagus. Controlled and assisted mechanical ventilation were applied with positive end-expiratory pressures of 5 and 15 cmH2O, and driving pressures of 10 and 20 cmH2O, in supine and lateral decubitus.
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Effects of intravascular volume replacement on lung and kidney function and damage in nonseptic experimental lung injury.
Anesthesiology
PUBLISHED: 07-09-2013
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Intravascular volume replacement is often required in the presence of increased pulmonary capillary leakage, for example in patients with volutrauma with major hemorrhage. In the present study, the effects of Ringers acetate (RA), gelatin-polysuccinate (GEL), and a modern hydroxyethyl starch (HES, 6% 130/0.42) on lung and kidney function and damage were compared in a two-hit model of acute lung injury. The authors hypothesized that GEL and HES, compared to RA: (1) reduced lung histological damage, (2) impaired kidney morphology and function.
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Mechanical ventilation during anaesthesia: challenges and opportunities for investigating the respiration-related cardiovascular oscillations.
Biomed Tech (Berl)
PUBLISHED: 07-06-2011
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The vast majority of the available literature regarding cardiovascular oscillations refers to spontaneously breathing subjects. Only a few studies investigated cardiovascular oscillations, and especially respiration-related ones (RCVO), during intermittent positive pressure mechanical ventilation (IPPV) under anaesthesia. Only a handful considered assisted IPPV, in which spontaneous breathing activity is supported, rather than replaced as in controlled IPPV. In this paper, we review the current understanding of RCVO physiology during IPPV, from literature retrieved through PubMed website. In particular, we describe how during controlled IPPV under anaesthesia respiratory sinus arrhythmia appears to be generated by non-neural mechano-electric feedback in the heart (indirectly influenced by tonic sympathetic regulation of vascular tone and heart contractility) and not by phasic vagal modulation of central origin and/or baroreflex mechanisms. Furthermore, assisted IPPV differs from controlled IPPV in terms of RCVO, reintroducing significant central respiratory vagal modulation of respiratory sinus arrhythmia. This evidence indicates against applying to IPPV interpretative paradigms of RCVO derived from spontaneously breathing subjects, and against considering together IPPV and spontaneously breathing subjects for RCVO-based risk assessment. Finally, we highlight the opportunities that IPPV offers for future investigations of RCVO genesis and interactions, and we indicate several possibilities for clinical applications of RCVO during IPPV.
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Distribution of regional lung aeration and perfusion during conventional and noisy pressure support ventilation in experimental lung injury.
J. Appl. Physiol.
PUBLISHED: 01-26-2011
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In acute lung injury (ALI), pressure support ventilation (PSV) may improve oxygenation compared with pressure-controlled ventilation (PCV), and benefit from random variation of pressure support (noisy PSV). We investigated the effects of PCV, PSV, and noisy PSV on gas exchange as well as the distribution of lung aeration and perfusion in 12 pigs with ALI induced by saline lung lavage in supine position. After injury, animals were mechanically ventilated with PCV, PSV, and noisy PSV for 1 h/mode in random sequence. The driving pressure was set to a mean tidal volume of 6 ml/kg and positive end-expiratory pressure to 8 cmH?O in all modes. Functional variables were measured, and the distribution of lung aeration was determined by static and dynamic computed tomography (CT), whereas the distribution of pulmonary blood flow (PBF) was determined by intravenously administered fluorescent microspheres. PSV and noisy PSV improved oxygenation and reduced venous admixture compared with PCV. Mechanical ventilation with PSV and noisy PSV did not decrease nonaerated areas but led to a redistribution of PBF from dorsal to ventral lung regions and reduced tidal reaeration and hyperinflation compared with PCV. Noisy PSV further improved oxygenation and redistributed PBF from caudal to cranial lung regions compared with conventional PSV. We conclude that assisted ventilation with PSV and noisy PSV improves oxygenation compared with PCV through redistribution of PBF from dependent to nondependent zones without lung recruitment. Random variation of pressure support further redistributes PBF and improves oxygenation compared with conventional PSV.
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Pressure support improves oxygenation and lung protection compared to pressure-controlled ventilation and is further improved by random variation of pressure support.
Crit. Care Med.
PUBLISHED: 01-26-2011
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To explore whether 1) conventional pressure support ventilation improves lung function and attenuates the pulmonary inflammatory response compared to pressure-controlled ventilation and 2) random variation of pressure support levels (noisy pressure support ventilation) adds further beneficial effects to pressure support ventilation.
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A novel adaptive control system for noisy pressure-controlled ventilation: a numerical simulation and bench test study.
Intensive Care Med
PUBLISHED: 04-24-2009
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There is growing interest in the use of both variable and pressure-controlled ventilation (PCV). The combination of these approaches as "noisy PCV" requires adaptation of the mechanical ventilator to the respiratory system mechanics. Thus, we developed and evaluated a new control system based on the least-mean-squares adaptive approach, which automatically and continuously adjusts the driving pressure during PCV to achieve the desired variability pattern of tidal volume (V (T)).
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Comparative effects of proportional assist and variable pressure support ventilation on lung function and damage in experimental lung injury.
Crit. Care Med.
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To investigate the effects of proportional assist ventilation, variable pressure support, and conventional pressure support ventilation on lung function and damage in experimental acute lung injury.
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Effects of assisted and variable mechanical ventilation on cardiorespiratory interactions in anesthetized pigs.
Physiol Meas
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The physiological importance of respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) and cardioventilatory coupling (CVC) has not yet been fully elucidated, but these phenomena might contribute to improve ventilation/perfusion matching, with beneficial effects on gas exchange. Furthermore, decreased RSA amplitude has been suggested as an indicator of impaired autonomic control and poor clinical outcome, also during positive-pressure mechanical ventilation (MV). However, it is currently unknown how different modes of MV, including variable tidal volumes (V(T)), affect RSA and CVC during anesthesia. We compared the effects of pressure controlled (PCV) versus pressure assisted (PSV) ventilation, and of random variable versus constant V(T), on RSA and CVC in eight anesthetized pigs. At comparable depth of anesthesia, global hemodynamics, and ventilation, RSA amplitude increased from 20 ms in PCV to 50 ms in PSV (p < 0.05). CVC was detected (using proportional Shannon entropy of the interval between each inspiration onset and the previous R-peak in ECG) in two animals in PCV and seven animals in PSV. Variable V(T) did not significantly influence these phenomena. Furthermore, heart period and systolic arterial pressure oscillations were in phase during PCV but in counter-phase during PSV. At the same depth of anesthesia in pigs, PSV increases RSA amplitude and CVC compared to PCV. Our data suggest that the central respiratory drive, but not the baroreflex or the mechano-electric feedback in the heart, is the main mechanism behind the RSA increase. Hence, differences in RSA and CVC between mechanically ventilated patients might reflect the difference in ventilation mode rather than autonomic impairment. Also, since gas exchange did not increase from PCV to PSV, it is questionable whether RSA has any significance in improving ventilation/perfusion matching during MV.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.