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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Dynamics of nucleoid structure regulated by mitochondrial fission contributes to cristae reformation and release of cytochrome c.
Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A.
PUBLISHED: 07-02-2013
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Mammalian cells typically contain thousands of copies of mitochondrial DNA assembled into hundreds of nucleoids. Here we analyzed the dynamic features of nucleoids in terms of mitochondrial membrane dynamics involving balanced fusion and fission. In mitochondrial fission GTPase dynamin-related protein (Drp1)-deficient cells, nucleoids were enlarged by their clustering within hyperfused mitochondria. In normal cells, mitochondrial fission often occurred adjacent to nucleoids, since localization of Mff and Drp1 is dependent on the nucleoids. Thus, mitochondrial fission adjacent to nucleoids should prevent their clustering by maintaining small and fragmented nucleoids. The enhanced clustering of nucleoids resulted in the formation of highly stacked cristae structures in enlarged bulb-like mitochondria (mito-bulbs). Enclosure of proapoptotic factor cytochrome c, but not of Smac/DIABLO, into the highly stacked cristae suppressed its release from mitochondria under apoptotic stimuli. In the absence of nucleoids, Drp1 deficiency failed to form mito-bulbs and to protect against apoptosis. Thus, mitochondrial dynamics by fission and fusion play a critical role in controlling mitochondrial nucleoid structures, contributing to cristae reformation and the proapoptotic status of mitochondria.
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Acquisition of LURE-binding activity at the pollen tube tip of Torenia fournieri.
Mol Plant
PUBLISHED: 03-12-2013
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Pollen tube guidance is controlled by multiple complex interactions with the female tissues. Here, we show that pollen tubes of Torenia fournieri are regulated by a stylar tissue in a length-dependent manner to receive and respond to attractant LURE peptides secreted from synergid cells. We developed an immunostaining method to visualize LURE peptides bound at the plasma membrane of the tip region of the pollen tube. Using this method, we found that LURE peptides bound specifically to pollen tubes growing through a cut style. The peptides also bound to pollen tubes growing through a shorter style, which were not competent to respond to these peptides. These observations suggested a possibility that acquisition of the LURE peptide reception ability and acquisition of full competency are separable processes. RNA-Seq suggested that the transcription profile of pollen tubes was affected by both the length of the style and the cultivation period, consistently with physiological changes in binding activity and LURE response ability. The database generated from de novo RNA-Seq of Torenia pollen tubes was shown to be useful to identify pollen tube proteins by mass spectrometry. Our studies provide insight and an effective platform for protein identification to understand pollen tube guidance.
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Identification and characterization of TcCRP1, a pollen tube attractant from Torenia concolor.
Ann. Bot.
PUBLISHED: 05-05-2011
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During sexual reproduction in higher angiosperms, the pollen tubes are directed to the ovules in the pistil to deliver sperm cells. This pollen tube attraction is highly species specific, and a group of small secreted proteins, TfCRPs, are necessary for this process in Torenia fournieri.
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Novel sterol glucosyltransferase in the animal tissue and cultured cells: evidence that glucosylceramide as glucose donor.
Biochim. Biophys. Acta
PUBLISHED: 02-09-2011
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Cholesteryl glucoside (CG), a membrane glycolipid, regulates heat shock response. CG is rapidly induced by heat shock before the activation of heat shock transcription factor 1 (HSF1) and production of heat shock protein 70 (HSP70), and the addition of CG in turn induces HSF1 activation and HSP70 production in human fibroblasts; thus, a reasonable correlation is that CG functions as a crucial lipid mediator in stress responses in the animal. In this study, we focused on a CG-synthesizing enzyme, animal sterol glucosyltransferase, which has not yet been identified. In this study, we describe a novel type of animal sterol glucosyltransferase in hog stomach and human fibroblasts (TIG-3) detected by a sensitive assay with a fluorescence-labeled substrate. The cationic requirement, inhibitor resistance, and substrate specificity of animal sterol glucosyltransferase were studied. Interestingly, animal sterol glucosyltransferase did not use uridine diphosphate glucose (UDP-glucose) as an immediate glucose donor, as has been shown in plants and fungi. Among the glycolipids tested in vitro, glucosylceramide (GlcCer) was the most effective substrate for CG formation in animal tissues and cultured cells. Using chemically synthesized [U-((13))C]Glc-?-Cer as a glucose donor, we confirmed by mass spectrometry that [U-((13))C]CG was synthesized in hog stomach homogenate. These results suggest that animal sterol glucosyltransferase transfers glucose moiety from GlcCer to cholesterol. Additionally, using GM-95, a mutant B16 melanoma cell line that does not express ceramide glucosyltransferase, we showed that GlcCer is an essential substrate for animal sterol glucosyltransferase in the cell.
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Live-cell imaging reveals the dynamics of two sperm cells during double fertilization in Arabidopsis thaliana.
Curr. Biol.
PUBLISHED: 02-04-2011
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Flowering plants have evolved a unique reproductive process called double fertilization, whereby two dimorphic female gametes are fertilized by two immotile sperm cells conveyed by the pollen tube. The two sperm cells are arranged in tandem with a leading pollen tube nucleus to form the male germ unit and are placed under the same genetic controls. Genes controlling double fertilization have been identified, but whether each sperm cell is able to fertilize either female gamete is still unclear. The dynamics of individual sperm cells after their release in the female tissue remain largely unknown. In this study, we photolabeled individual isomorphic sperm cells before their release and analyzed their fate during double fertilization in Arabidopsis thaliana. We found that sperm delivery was composed of three steps. Sperm cells were projected together to the boundary between the two female gametes. After a long period of immobility, each sperm cell fused with either female gamete in no particular order, and no preference was observed for either female gamete. Our results suggest that the two sperm cells at the front and back of the male germ unit are functionally equivalent and suggest unexpected cell-cell communications required for sperm cells to coordinate double fertilization of the two female gametes.
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DNA packaging proteins Glom and Glom2 coordinately organize the mitochondrial nucleoid of Physarum polycephalum.
Mitochondrion
PUBLISHED: 02-03-2011
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Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is generally packaged into the mitochondrial nucleoid (mt-nucleoid) by a high-mobility group (HMG) protein. Glom is an mtDNA-packaging HMG protein in Physarum polycephalum. Here we identified a new mtDNA-packaging protein, Glom2, which had a region homologous with yeast Mgm101. Glom2 could bind to an entire mtDNA and worked synergistically with Glom for condensation of mtDNA in vitro. Down-regulation of Glom2 enhanced the alteration of mt-nucleoid morphology and the loss of mtDNA induced by down-regulation of Glom, and impaired mRNA accumulation of some mtDNA-encoded genes. These data suggest that Glom2 may organize the mt-nucleoid coordinately with Glom.
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Chemical visualization of an attractant peptide, LURE.
Plant Cell Physiol.
PUBLISHED: 12-11-2010
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The pollen tube attractant peptide LUREs of Torenia fournieri are diffusible peptides that attract pollen tubes in vitro. Here, we report a method enabling the direct visualization of a LURE peptide without inhibiting its attraction activity by conjugating it with the Alexa Fluor 488 fluorescent dye. After purifying and refolding the recombinant LURE2 with a polyhistidine tag, its amino groups were targeted for conjugation with the Alexa Fluor dye. Labeling of LURE2 was confirmed by its fluorescence and mass spectrometry. In our in vitro assay using gelatin beads, Alexa Fluor 488-labeled LURE2 appeared to have the same activity as unlabeled LURE2. Using the labeled LURE2, the relationship between the spatiotemporal change of distribution and activity of LURE2 was examined. LURE2 attracted pollen tubes when embedded in gelatin beads, but hardly at all when in agarose beads. Direct visualization suggested that the significant difference between these conditions was the retention of LURE2 in the gelatin bead, which might delay diffusion of LURE2 from the bead. Direct visualization of LURE peptide may open the way to studying the spatiotemporal dynamics of LURE in pollen tube attraction.
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MOV10 as a novel telomerase-associated protein.
Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun.
PUBLISHED: 07-15-2009
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A novel telomerase-associated protein was isolated from porcine testis. The 115-kDa protein, purified with telomerase activity, was molecular cloned using human cDNA library, and identified as MOV10. The expression levels of both MOV10 mRNA and MOV10 protein in cancer cells were 2-3 times higher than that of the normal cells, and MOV10 mRNA was highly expressed in human testis and ovary. The anti-MOV10 antibody precipitated the telomerase activity from cancer cell extracts, and inhibited the telomerase activity in vitro. Sf9-expressed MOV10 protein bound to G-rich strand of both single- and double-stranded telomere-sequenced DNA, but not to single C-rich strand. ChIP assay showed the binding of MOV10 to telomere region in vivo. These data suggest that MOV10 is involved in the progression of telomerase-catalyzing reaction via the interaction of telomerase protein and telomere DNA.
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The Plasmodium HU homolog, which binds the plastid DNA sequence-independent manner, is essential for the parasites survival.
FEBS Lett.
PUBLISHED: 02-27-2009
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The nuclear genome of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum encodes a homolog of the bacterial HU protein (PfHU). In this study, we characterised PfHUs physiological function. PfHU, which is targeted exclusively to the parasites plastid, bound its natural target--the plastid DNA--sequence-independently and complemented lack of HU in Escherichia coli. The HU gene could not be knocked-out from the genome of Plasmodium berghei, implying that HU is important for the parasites survival. As the human cell lacks the HU homolog, PfHU is a potential target for drugs to control malaria.
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Defensin-like polypeptide LUREs are pollen tube attractants secreted from synergid cells.
Nature
PUBLISHED: 02-10-2009
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For more than 140 years, pollen tube guidance in flowering plants has been thought to be mediated by chemoattractants derived from target ovules. However, there has been no convincing evidence of any particular molecule being the true attractant that actually controls the navigation of pollen tubes towards ovules. Emerging data indicate that two synergid cells on the side of the egg cell emit a diffusible, species-specific signal to attract the pollen tube at the last step of pollen tube guidance. Here we report that secreted, cysteine-rich polypeptides (CRPs) in a subgroup of defensin-like proteins are attractants derived from the synergid cells. We isolated synergid cells of Torenia fournieri, a unique plant with a protruding embryo sac, to identify transcripts encoding secreted proteins as candidate molecules for the chemoattractant(s). We found two CRPs, abundantly and predominantly expressed in the synergid cell, which are secreted to the surface of the egg apparatus. Moreover, they showed activity in vitro to attract competent pollen tubes of their own species and were named as LUREs. Injection of morpholino antisense oligomers against the LUREs impaired pollen tube attraction, supporting the finding that LUREs are the attractants derived from the synergid cells of T. fournieri.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

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We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

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In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.