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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Chemical composition and in vitro cytotoxic effects of the essential oil from Nectandra leucantha leaves.
Pharm Biol
PUBLISHED: 10-24-2014
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Abstract Context: Nectandra (Lauraceae) species have been used in folk medicine as an antidiarrheal, analgesic, antifungal, etc., and have many pharmacological proprieties. Objective: Investigation of the chemical composition and cytotoxicity of essential oil from Nectandra leucantha Nees & Mart. leaves. This is the first study involving N. leucantha reported in the literature. Material and methods: The essential oil of N. leucantha leaves was obtained by hydrodistillation. Its chemical composition was determined using a combination of GC/FID, GC/MS, and determination of Kovats index (KI). In vitro cytotoxic activity was evaluated against six cancer cell lines - murine melanoma (B16F10-Nex2), human glioblastome (U-87), human cervical carcinoma (HeLa), human colon carcinoma (HCT), human breast adenocarcinoma (MCF7), and human cervical tumor (Siha) as well as against one non-tumorigenic cell line - human foreskin fibroblast (HFF). Results: Thirty-three compounds were identified primarily sesquiterpenes (81.41%), the main compounds being bicyclogermacrene (28.44%), germacrene A (7.34%), spathulenol (5.82%), and globulol (5.25%). Furthermore, monoterpenes were also found in the analyzed oil (12.84%), predominantly ?- and ?-pinenes (6.59 and 4.57%, respectively). The crude essential oil displayed significant cytotoxic activity against B16F10-Nex2 (IC50 33?±?1??g/mL) and U87 (IC50 75.95?±?0.03??g/mL) and HeLa (IC50 60?±?12??g/mL) cell lines. The main identified compound, bicyclogermacrene, displayed IC50 ranging from 3.1?±?0.2 to 21?±?6??g/mL. Discussion and conclusion: The results indicate that the crude oils from leaves of N. leucantha displayed cytotoxic activity being bicyclogermacrene, the main compound identified in the crude oil responsible, at least in part, for this potential.
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Mastoparan induces apoptosis in B16F10-Nex2 melanoma cells via the intrinsic mitochondrial pathway and displays antitumor activity in vivo.
Peptides
PUBLISHED: 08-04-2014
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Mastoparan is an ?-helical and amphipathic tetradecapeptide obtained from the venom of the wasp Vespula lewissi. This peptide exhibits a wide variety of biological effects, including antimicrobial activity, increased histamine release from mast cells, induction of a potent mitochondrial permeability transition and tumor cell cytotoxicity. Here, the effects of mastoparan in malignant melanoma were studied using the murine model of B16F10-Nex2 cells. In vitro, mastoparan caused melanoma cell death by the mitochondrial apoptosis pathway, as evidenced by the Annexin V-FITC/PI assay, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (??m), generation of reactive oxygen species, DNA degradation and cell death signaling. Most importantly, mastoparan reduced the growth of subcutaneous melanoma in syngeneic mice and increased their survival. The present results show that mastoparan induced caspase-dependent apoptosis in melanoma cells through the intrinsic mitochondrial pathway protecting the mice against tumor development.
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A subtraction tolerization method of immunization allowed for Wilms' tumor protein-1 (WT1) identification in melanoma and discovery of an antitumor peptide sequence.
J. Immunol. Methods
PUBLISHED: 07-28-2014
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On searching for melanoma transcription factors in a project focusing on internal antitumor peptide sequences from transcription factors, we found that a highly immunogenic component emerged upon using a subtraction tolerization method of immunization. While several conventional immunization procedures using whole melanoma cells induced a plethora of low affinity antibodies of various specificities, the subtraction tolerization method efficiently elicited mono-specific antibodies that recognized Wilms' tumor protein 1 (WT1), which is known as an important marker in melanoma prognosis and treatment. For the tolerization step, pre-immunization of Balb/c mice with a membrane-rich preparation of glioblastoma U87 cells was used. The subsequent immunizations with SK-MEL-28 melanoma cells elicited antibodies strongly reacting with 50 and 55kDa proteins, identified as WT1. Remarkably, this was the only component strongly reactive with these antibodies in a melanoma cell lysate. WT1 was then chosen as a target for selecting internally bioactive peptides. A hydrophilic Trojan peptide containing most of the zinc finger-2 domain of WT1 was synthesized and shown to inhibit SK-MEL-28 melanoma growth in vitro. The peptide WT1-pTj was also protective in vivo in a metastatic melanoma model and peptide-stimulated syngeneic dendritic cells reproduced the anti-melanoma effect of the unprotected peptide. Identification of antitumor peptides derived from major transcription factors represents a new tool to be explored in cancer research aiming at new therapeutic drugs.
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A novel cell-penetrating peptide derived from WT1 enhances p53 activity, induces cell senescence and displays antimelanoma activity in xeno- and syngeneic systems.
FEBS Open Bio
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2014
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The Wilms tumor protein 1 (WT1) transcription factor has been associated in malignant melanoma with cell survival and metastasis, thus emerging as a candidate for targeted therapy. A lysine-arginine rich peptide, WT1-pTj, derived from the ZF domain of WT1 was evaluated as an antitumor agent against A2058 human melanoma cells and B16F10-Nex2 syngeneic murine melanoma. Peptide WT1-pTj quickly penetrated human melanoma cells and induced senescence, recognized by increased SA-?-galactosidase activity, enhanced transcriptional activity of p53, and induction of the cell cycle inhibitors p21 and p27. Moreover, the peptide bound to p53 and competed with WT1 protein for binding to p53. WT1-pTj treatment led to sustained cell growth suppression, abrogation of clonogenicity and G2/M cell cycle arrest. Notably, in vivo studies showed that WT1-pTj inhibited both the metastases and subcutaneous growth of murine melanoma in syngeneic mice, and prolonged the survival of nude mice challenged with human melanoma cells. The 27-amino acid cell-penetrating WT1-derived peptide, depends on C(3) and H(16) for effective antimelanoma activity, inhibits proliferation of WT1-expressing human tumor cell lines, and may have an effective role in the treatment of WT1-expressing malignancies.
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Jacaranone induces apoptosis in melanoma cells via ROS-mediated downregulation of Akt and p38 MAPK activation and displays antitumor activity in vivo.
PLoS ONE
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Malignant melanoma is a deadly type of metastatic skin cancer with increased incidence over the past 30 years. Despite the advanced knowledge on the biology, immunobiology and molecular genetics of melanoma, the alternatives of treatment are limited with poor prognosis. On clinical trials, natural products and among them redox-active quinones have been tested in the attempt to control the growth of cancer cells. Recently, we isolated jacaranone from Pentacalia desiderabilis, a benzoquinone derivative that showed a broad antitumor activity and protective anti-melanoma effect in a syngeneic model. The purified substance is active at micromolar concentrations, is not hemolytic, and is not toxic in naïve mice.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

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We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

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In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.