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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Treatment use in a prospective naturalistic cohort of children and adolescents with catatonia.
Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry
PUBLISHED: 08-27-2014
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We aimed to (1) describe the treatment used in a large sample of young inpatients with catatonia, (2) determine which factors were associated with improvement and (3) benzodiazepine (BZD) efficacy. From 1993 to 2011, 66 patients between the ages of 9 and 19 years were consecutively hospitalized for a catatonic syndrome. We prospectively collected sociodemographic, clinical and treatment data. In total, 51 (77 %) patients underwent a BZD trial. BZDs were effective in 33 (65 %) patients, who were associated with significantly fewer severe adverse events (p = 0.013) and resulted in fewer referrals for electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) (p = 0.037). Other treatments included ECT (N = 12, 18 %); antipsychotic medications, mostly in combination; and treatment of an underlying medical condition, when possible. For 10 patients, four different trials were needed to achieve clinical improvement. When all treatments were combined, there was a better clinical response in acute-onset catatonia (p = 0.032). In contrast, the response was lower in boys (p = 0.044) and when posturing (p = 0.04) and mannerisms (p = 0.008) were present as catatonic symptoms. The treatment response was independent of the underlying psychiatric or systemic medical condition. As in adults, BZDs should be the first-line symptomatic treatment for catatonia in young patients, and ECT should be a second option. Additionally, the absence of an association between the response to treatment and the underlying psychiatric condition suggests that catatonia should be considered as a syndrome.
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French version of the Brief Infant-Toddler Social and Emotional Assessment questionnaire-BITSEA.
J Pediatr Psychol
PUBLISHED: 04-08-2014
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The aim of the present study was to examine the psychometric properties of the French version of the Brief Infant-Toddler Social and Emotional Assessment (BITSEA).
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Diagnostic transition towards schizophrenia in adolescents with severe bipolar disorder type I: An 8-year follow-up study.
Schizophr. Res.
PUBLISHED: 04-02-2014
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The diagnosis of bipolar disorder-I (BD-I) is currently well-established. However, more studies exploring diagnostic stability and psychosocial adaptation during follow-up in adulthood are needed.
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Does epilepsy in multiplex autism pedigrees define a different subgroup in terms of clinical characteristics and genetic risk?
Mol Autism
PUBLISHED: 04-03-2013
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Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and epilepsy frequently occur together. Prevalence rates are variable, and have been attributed to age, gender, comorbidity, subtype of pervasive developmental disorder (PDD) and risk factors. Recent studies have suggested disparate clinical and genetic settings depending on simplex or multiplex autism. The aim of this study was to assess: 1) the prevalence of epilepsy in multiplex autism and its association with genetic and non-genetic risk factors of major effect, intellectual disability and gender; and 2) whether autism and epilepsy cosegregate within multiplex autism families.
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Infants engagement and emotion as predictors of autism or intellectual disability in West syndrome.
Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry
PUBLISHED: 01-09-2013
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West syndrome (WS) is a rare epileptic encephalopathy with early onset and a high risk of autistic outcome. The PréAut grid assesses this risk following WS onset by taking into account synchrony and emotion in interactions and by evaluating the babys active desire to engage in pleasant interactions (especially the infants early active behaviors that encourage being gazed at or kissed by the mother or to share joy with her). We followed a sample of 25 WS patients prospectively from disease onset and assessed whether the PréAut grid before 9 months, and the checklist for autism in toddlers (CHAT) at 18 and 24 months predicted autism or intellectual disability (ID) outcomes at 4 years. We found that the PréAut grid at 9 months (sensitivity = 0.83; specificity = 1) had similar prediction parameters as the CHAT at 18 months (sensitivity = 0.90; specificity = 0.83) and 24 months (sensitivity = 0.92; specificity = 1). WS patients with a positive PréAut screening at 9 months had a risk of having autism or ID at 4 years, which is 38 times that of children with a negative PréAut grid [OR = 38.6 (95 % CI 2.2-2961); p = 0.006]. We conclude that the PréAut grid could be a useful tool for the early detection of autism or ID risk in the context of WS. Further research is needed to assess the PréAut grid in other contexts (e.g. infants at high-risk for non-syndromic autism).
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Is pervasive developmental disorder not otherwise specified less stable than autistic disorder? A meta-analysis.
J Autism Dev Disord
PUBLISHED: 07-22-2011
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We reviewed the stability of the diagnosis of pervasive developmental disorder not otherwise specified (PDD-NOS). A Medline search found eight studies reiterating a diagnostic assessment for PDD-NOS. The pooled group included 322 autistic disorder (AD) and 122 PDD-NOS cases. We used percentage of individuals with same diagnose at Times 1 and 2 as response criterion. The pooled Relative Risk was 1.95 (p < 0.001) showing that AD diagnostic stability was higher than PDD-NOS. When diagnosed before 36 months PDD-NOS bore a 3-year stability rate of 35%. Examining the developmental trajectories showed that PDD-NOS corresponded to a group of heterogeneous pathological conditions including prodromic forms of later AD, remitted or less severe forms of AD, and developmental delays in interaction and communication.
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Children and adolescents with severe mental illness need vitamin D supplementation regardless of disease or treatment.
J Child Adolesc Psychopharmacol
PUBLISHED: 04-12-2011
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To protect against osteoporosis, keeping the vitamin D blood level (25[OH]D; VDBL) above 30?ng/mL is recommended. It is established that regular intake of vitamin D, calcium intake, and physical exercise contribute to maximizing bone mineral mass during childhood and adolescence. Recent articles suggest that patients with schizophrenia treated with antipsychotics have low VDBL and may have a higher risk of hip fractures in their later years than the general population.
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Lorazepam, fluoxetine and packing therapy in an adolescent with pervasive developmental disorder and catatonia.
J. Physiol. Paris
PUBLISHED: 10-01-2010
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Packing therapy is an adjunct symptomatic treatment used for autism and/or catatonia. Here, we report the case of a 15-year-old boy with pervasive developmental disorder who developed catatonia. At admission, catatonic symptoms were severe and the patient required a feeding tube. Lorazepam up to 15 mg/day moderately improved the catatonic symptoms. On day 36 we added fluoxetine and on day 62 we added packing therapy (twice per week, 10 sessions). After three packing sessions, the patient showed a significant clinical improvement (P<0.001). At discharge (day 96), he was able to return to his special education program. Although we do not consider packing as a psychodynamic treatment, this case challenges the concept of embodied self that has opened new perspectives on a dialogue between psychoanalysis and neuroscience. Indeed, better body representation following packing sessions, as shown in patients drawing, paralleled clinical improvement, and supports the concept of embodied self. This concept may serve as a link between psychoanalysis and attachment theory, developmental psychology with the early description of "sense of self", and cognitive neurosciences that more and more support the concept of embodied cognition. Further clinical studies are necessary to clarify the efficacy and underlying mechanism of packing treatment and to understand how patients experience may illustrate the concept of embodied self.
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Psychodynamic-oriented psychological assessment predicts evolution to schizophrenia at 8-year follow-up in adolescents hospitalized for a manic/mixed episode: interest of an overall subjective rating.
J. Physiol. Paris
PUBLISHED: 09-08-2010
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Little is known concerning the prognostic significance of manic/mixed episodes in adolescents. In particular, whether the use of psychodynamic-oriented projective psychological testing predicts evolution to schizophrenia at follow-up has not been established. Eighty subjects, aged 12-20years old, consecutively hospitalized for a manic or mixed episode between 1994 and 2003 were recruited. All patients were contacted in 2005-2006 for a follow-up assessment. For the subgroup of adolescents (N=40) who had psychodynamic-oriented psychological testing (Rorschach and TAT), two scores regarding psychosocial risk and schizophrenia risk were computed using the clinical global impression (CGI) assessment based on an overall subjective rating given by a panel of expert psychologists who reviewed all protocols. At follow-up (average 8years), 25 (62.5%) patients, 16 females and nine males, were assessed: 14 still had a diagnosis of bipolar disorder; eight changed to schizo-affective disorder and three to schizophrenia. Inter-rater reliability of both CGI-risk scores (psychosocial risk and schizophrenia risk) showed good clinical consensus with intraclass correlation and Kappa scores ranging from 0.53 to 0.75. Univariate analysis showed that CGI-psychosocial risk score (p=0.017), type of index episode (p=0.049) and CGI-schizophrenia risk score (p=0.09) were associated with transition to schizophrenia spectrum disorder at follow-up. Age, sex, socioeconomic status, duration of stay and the presence of psychotic features at index episode were not associated with the transition. We conclude that the CGI assessment appears to be valid to score risk of poor outcome using psychodynamic-oriented psychological testing and that these scores may predict, in part, the transition to schizophrenia in adolescents with a history of manic/mixed episode.
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Depression during pregnancy: is the developmental impact earlier in boys? A prospective case-control study.
J Clin Psychiatry
PUBLISHED: 04-21-2010
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Animal studies have shown sex differences in the impact of prenatal maternal stress on the offspring. The aim of this prospective case-control study was to assess the effect of prenatal depression on newborn and 1-year-old infant characteristics as related to gender, controlling for confounding variables.
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Predictors of placebo response in randomized controlled trials of psychotropic drugs for children and adolescents with internalizing disorders.
J Child Adolesc Psychopharmacol
PUBLISHED: 02-20-2010
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The aim of this study was to assess predictors of placebo response in all available short-term, placebo-controlled trials of psychotropic drugs for children and adolescents with internalizing disorders, major depressive disorder (MDD), obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD,) and anxiety disorders (ANX) exclusive of OCD and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD).
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Electroconvulsive therapy in adolescents with intellectual disability and severe self-injurious behavior and aggression: a retrospective study.
Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry
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Efficacious intervention for severe, treatment-refractory self-injurious behavior and aggression (SIB/AGG) in children and adolescents with intellectual disability and concomitant psychiatric disorders remains a complex and urgent issue. The aim of this study is to assess the efficacy of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) on severe and treatment-resistant SIB/AGG in young people with intellectual disability and current psychiatric disorder. We reviewed the charts of all patients (N = 4) who received ECT in the context of SIB/AGG with resistance to behavioral interventions, milieu therapy and pharmacotherapy from 2007 to 2011. We scored the daily rate of SIB/AGG per patient for each hospital day. Inter rater reliability was good (intraclass correlations = 0.91). We used a mixed generalized linear model to assess whether the following explanatory variables (time, ECT) influenced the course of SIB/AGG over time, the dependant variable. The sample included two girls and two boys. The mean age at admission was 13.8 years old [range 12-14]. The patients had on average 19 ECT sessions [range 16-26] and one patient received maintenance ECT. There was no effect of time before and after ECT start. ECT was associated with a significant decrease in SIB/AGG scores (p < 0.001): mean aggression score post-ECT was half the pre-ECT value. ECT appears beneficial in severe, treatment-resistant SHBA in adolescents with intellectual disability.
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Psychiatric and cognitive phenotype of childhood myotonic dystrophy type 1.
Dev Med Child Neurol
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To investigate the psychiatric and cognitive phenotype in young individuals with the childhood form of myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1).
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Adverse effects of second-generation antipsychotics in children and adolescents: a Bayesian meta-analysis.
J Clin Psychopharmacol
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In adults, second-generation antipsychotics (SGAs) have a low frequency of extrapyramidal syndrome (EPS) and a moderate frequency of metabolic adverse effects. Here we aimed to assess short-term adverse effects of SGAs in children and adolescents. We searched for relevant studies in MEDLINE and EMBASE (1996-2010), Food and Drug Administration and European Medicines Agency clinical trial registries, and reference lists of review articles. We found 41 were short-term (3-12 weeks) controlled studies that evaluated SGA adverse effects in youths. Using Bayesian meta-analysis, we analyzed odds ratios (ORs) or mean average effects. Numbers of arms (subjects) in the 41 trials were aripiprazole, 10 (n = 671); olanzapine, 14 (n = 413); quetiapine, 10 (n = 446); risperidone, 25 (n = 1040); ziprasidone, 4 (n = 228); clozapine, 5 (n = 79); and placebo/untreated, 23 (n = 1138), totaling 93 arms (4015 patients). Clozapine was assessed only for weight gain and somnolence. Compared with placebo, significant treatment-related increases were observed for weight gain with olanzapine (mean ± SD = 3.99 ± 0.42 kg; 95% credible interval, 3.17-4.84 kg), clozapine (2.38 ± 1.13 kg; 95% credible interval, 0.19-4.62 kg), risperidone (2.02 ± 0.32 kg; 95% credible interval, 1.39-2.66 kg), quetiapine (1.74 ± 0.38 kg; 95% credible interval, 0.99-2.5 kg), and aripiprazole (0.89 ± 0.32 kg; 95% credible interval, 0.26-1.51 kg); glucose levels with risperidone (3.7 ± 1.36 mg/dL; 95% credible interval, 1.08-6.42 mg/dL) and olanzapine (2.09 ± 1.08 mg/dL; 95% credible interval, 0.13-4.32 mg/dL); cholesterol levels with quetiapine (10.77 ± 2.14 mg/dL; 95% credible interval, 6.6-14.95 mg/dL) and olanzapine (4.46 ± 1.65 mg/dL; 95% credible interval, 1.24-7.73 mg/dL); triglyceride levels with olanzapine (20.18 ± 5.26 mg/dL; 95% credible interval, 9.85-30.53 mg/dL) and quetiapine (19.5 ± 3.92 mg/dL; 95% credible interval, 11.84-27.17 mg/dL); hyperprolactinemia with risperidone (OR, 38.63; 95% credible interval, 8.62-125.6), olanzapine (OR, 15.6; 95% credible interval, 4.39-41.1), and ziprasidone (OR, 9.35; 95% credible interval, 1.24-37.03); and EPS with ziprasidone (OR, 20.56; 95% credible interval, 3.53-68.94), olanzapine (OR, 6.36; 95% credible interval, 2.43-13.84), aripiprazole (OR, 3.79; 95% credible interval, 2.17-6.17), and risperidone (OR, 3.71; 95% credible interval, 2.18-6.02). All SGAs increased the risk of somnolence/sedation. We conclude that short-term metabolic effects and EPS are frequent in children treated with SGAs. Second-generation antipsychotics have distinct profiles of secondary effects, which should be considered in making treatment decisions.
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Medical and developmental risk factors of catatonia in children and adolescents: a prospective case-control study.
Schizophr. Res.
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Rare diseases have been associated with more and more genetic and non genetic causes and risk factors. But this has not been systematically assessed in catatonia, one of the psychiatric syndromes, that is most frequently associated with medical condition.
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Prenatal ultrasound screening: false positive soft markers may alter maternal representations and mother-infant interaction.
PLoS ONE
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In up to 5% of pregnancies, ultrasound screening detects a "soft marker" (SM) that places the foetus at risk for a severe abnormality. In most cases, prenatal diagnostic work-up rules out a severe defect. We aimed to study the effects of false positive SM on maternal emotional status, maternal representations of the infant, and mother-infant interaction.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.