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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Supporting a happy, healthy adolescence for young people with Down syndrome and other intellectual disabilities: recommendations for clinicians.
Curr. Opin. Pediatr.
PUBLISHED: 07-11-2014
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To review clinical updates and current healthcare issues for adolescents with Down syndrome and intellectual disabilities, including behavioral, social, and emotional issues, health supervision recommendations, and recommendations for supporting the transition process.
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Proteinase-Activated Receptor 1 (PAR1) regulates leukemic stem cell functions.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2014
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External signals that are mediated by specific receptors determine stem cell fate. The thrombin receptor PAR1 plays an important role in haemostasis, thrombosis and vascular biology, but also in tumor biology and angiogenesis. Its expression and function in hematopoietic stem cells is largely unknown. Here, we analyzed expression and function of PAR1 in primary hematopoietic cells and their leukemic counterparts. AML patients' blast cells expressed much lower levels of PAR1 mRNA and protein than CD34+ progenitor cells. Constitutive Par1-deficiency in adult mice did not affect engraftment or stem cell potential of hematopoietic cells. To model an AML with Par1-deficiency, we retrovirally introduced the oncogene MLL-AF9 in wild type and Par1-/- hematopoietic progenitor cells. Par1-deficiency did not alter initial leukemia development. However, the loss of Par1 enhanced leukemic stem cell function in vitro and in vivo. Re-expression of PAR1 in Par1-/- leukemic stem cells delayed leukemogenesis in vivo. These data indicate that Par1 contributes to leukemic stem cell maintenance.
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Genome-wide analysis of histone H3 acetylation patterns in AML identifies PRDX2 as an epigenetically silenced tumor suppressor gene.
Blood
PUBLISHED: 12-29-2011
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With the use of ChIP on microarray assays in primary leukemia samples, we report that acute myeloid leukemia (AML) blasts exhibit significant alterations in histone H3 acetylation (H3Ac) levels at > 1000 genomic loci compared with CD34(+) progenitor cells. Importantly, core promoter regions tended to have lower H3Ac levels in AML compared with progenitor cells, which suggested that a large number of genes are epigenetically silenced in AML. Intriguingly, we identified peroxiredoxin 2 (PRDX2) as a novel potential tumor suppressor gene in AML. H3Ac was decreased at the PRDX2 gene promoter in AML, which correlated with low mRNA and protein expression. We also observed DNA hypermethylation at the PRDX2 promoter in AML. Low protein expression of the antioxidant PRDX2 gene was clinically associated with poor prognosis in patients with AML. Functionally, PRDX2 acted as inhibitor of myeloid cell growth by reducing levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated in response to cytokines. Forced PRDX2 expression inhibited c-Myc-induced leukemogenesis in vivo on BM transplantation in mice. Taken together, epigenome-wide analyses of H3Ac in AML led to the identification of PRDX2 as an epigenetically silenced growth suppressor, suggesting a possible role of ROS in the malignant phenotype in AML.
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Inhibitor of cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) interacting with cyclin A1 (INCA1) regulates proliferation and is repressed by oncogenic signaling.
J. Biol. Chem.
PUBLISHED: 05-03-2011
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The cell cycle is driven by the kinase activity of cyclin·cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) complexes, which is negatively regulated by CDK inhibitor proteins. Recently, we identified INCA1 as an interaction partner and a substrate of cyclin A1 in complex with CDK2. On a functional level, we identified a novel cyclin-binding site in the INCA1 protein. INCA1 inhibited CDK2 activity and cell proliferation. The inhibitory effects depended on the cyclin-interacting domain. Mitogenic and oncogenic signals suppressed INCA1 expression, whereas it was induced by cell cycle arrest. We established a deletional mouse model that showed increased CDK2 activity in spleen with altered spleen architecture in Inca1(-/-) mice. Inca1(-/-) embryonic fibroblasts showed an increase in the fraction of S-phase cells. Furthermore, blasts from acute lymphoid leukemia and acute myeloid leukemia patients expressed significantly reduced INCA1 levels highlighting its relevance for growth control in vivo. Taken together, this study identifies a novel CDK inhibitor with reduced expression in acute myeloid and lymphoid leukemia. The molecular events that control the cell cycle occur in a sequential process to ensure a tight regulation, which is important for the survival of a cell and includes the detection and repair of genetic damage and the prevention of uncontrolled cell division.
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The inhibitor of growth protein 5 (ING5) depends on INCA1 as a co-factor for its antiproliferative effects.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 04-29-2011
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The proteins of the Inhibitor of Growth (ING) family are involved in multiple cellular functions such as cell cycle regulation, apoptosis, and chromatin remodeling. For ING5, its actual role in growth suppression and the necessary partners are not known. In a yeast-two-hybrid approach with human bone marrow derived cDNA, we identified ING5 as well as several other proteins as interaction partners of Inhibitor of cyclin A1 (INCA1) that we previously characterized as a novel interaction partner of cyclin A1/CDK2. ING5 expression in leukemic AML blasts was severely reduced compared to normal bone marrow. In line, ING5 inhibited bone marrow colony formation upon retroviral transduction. However, Inca1(-/-) bone marrow colony formation was not suppressed by ING5. In murine embryonic fibroblast (MEF) cells from Inca1(+/+) and Inca1(-/-) mice, overexpression of ING5 suppressed cell proliferation only in the presence of INCA1, while ING5 had no effect in Inca1(-/-) MEFs. ING5 overexpression induced a delay in S-phase progression, which required INCA1. Finally, ING5 overexpression enhanced Fas-induced apoptosis in Inca1(+/+) MEFs, while Inca1(-/-) MEFs were protected from Fas antibody-induced apoptosis. Taken together, these results indicate that ING5 is a growth suppressor with suppressed expression in AML whose functions depend on its interaction with INCA1.
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AML1/ETO induces self-renewal in hematopoietic progenitor cells via the Groucho-related amino-terminal AES protein.
Blood
PUBLISHED: 01-18-2011
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The most frequent translocation t(8;21) in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) generates the chimeric AML1/ETO protein, which blocks differentiation and induces self-renewal in hematopoietic progenitor cells. The underlying mechanisms mediating AML1/ETO-induced self-renewal are largely unknown. Using expression microarray analysis, we identified the Groucho-related amino-terminal enhancer of split (AES) as a consistently up-regulated AML1/ETO target. Elevated levels of AES mRNA and protein were confirmed in AML1/ETO-expressing leukemia cells, as well as in other AML specimens. High expression of AES mRNA or protein was associated with improved survival of AML patients, even in the absence of t(8;21). On a functional level, knockdown of AES by RNAi in AML1/ETO-expressing cell lines inhibited colony formation. Similarly, self-renewal induced by AML1/ETO in primary murine progenitors was inhibited when AES was decreased or absent. High levels of AES expression enhanced formation of immature colonies, serial replating capacity of primary cells, and colony formation in colony-forming unit-spleen assays. These findings establish AES as a novel AML1/ETO-induced target gene that plays an important role in the self-renewal phenotype of t(8;21)-positive AML.
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Increased HDAC1 deposition at hematopoietic promoters in AML and its association with patient survival.
Leuk. Res.
PUBLISHED: 07-12-2010
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Epigenetic changes play a crucial role in leukemogenesis. HDACs are frequently recruited to target gene promoters by balanced translocation derived oncogenic fusion proteins. As important epigenetic effector mechanisms, histone deacetylases (HDAC) have emerged as potential therapeutic targets. However, the patterns of HDAC1 localization and the role of HDACs in leukemia pathogenesis remain to be elucidated. Using ChIP-Chip analyses we analyzed HDAC1 deposition patterns at more than 10,000 gene promoters in a large cohort of leukemia patients and CD34+ controls. HDAC1 binding was significantly increased in AML blasts compared to CD34+ progenitor cells at 130 gene promoters whereas decreased binding was observed at 66 gene promoters. Distinct HDAC1 binding patterns occurred in AML subtypes with balanced translocations t(15;17), t(8;21) and inv(16). In addition, a more generalized signature was established, that revealed an AML specific pattern of HDAC1 distribution. Many of the HDAC1-binding altered promoters regulate genes involved in hematopoiesis, transcriptional regulation and signal transduction. HDAC1 binding patterns were associated with patients event free survival. This is the first study to determine HDAC1 modification patterns in a large number of AML and ALL specimens. Our findings suggest that dyslocalization of HDAC1 is a common feature in AML. Importantly, HDAC1 modifications possess prognostic power for patient survival. Our findings suggest that altered HDAC1 localization is an explanation for the observed benefit of HDAC inhibitors in AML therapy.
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Pim2 cooperates with PML-RARalpha to induce acute myeloid leukemia in a bone marrow transplantation model.
Blood
PUBLISHED: 03-09-2010
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Although the potential role of Pim2 as a cooperative oncogene has been well described in lymphoma, its role in leukemia has remained largely unexplored. Here we show that high expression of Pim2 is observed in patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). To further characterize the cooperative role of Pim2 with promyelocytic leukemia/retinoic acid receptor alpha (PML/RARalpha), we used a well-established PML-RARalpha (PRalpha) mouse model. Pim2 coexpression in PRalpha-positive hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) induces leukemia in recipient mice after a short latency. Pim2-PRalpha cells were able to repopulate mice in serial transplantations and to induce disease in all recipients. Neither Pim2 nor PRalpha alone was sufficient to induce leukemia upon transplantation in this model. The disease induced by Pim2 overexpression in PRalpha cells contained a slightly higher fraction of immature myeloid cells, compared with the previously described APL disease induced by PRalpha. However, it also clearly resembled an APL-like phenotype and showed signs of differentiation upon all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) treatment in vitro. These results support the hypothesis that Pim2, which is also a known target of Flt3-ITD (another gene that cooperates with PML-RARalpha), cooperates with PRalpha to induce APL-like disease.
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BCR-ABL enhances differentiation of long-term repopulating hematopoietic stem cells.
Blood
PUBLISHED: 01-06-2010
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In a previously developed inducible transgenic mouse model of chronic myeloid leukemia, we now demonstrate that the disease is transplantable using BCR-ABL(+) Lin(-)Sca-1(+)c-kit(+) (LSK) cells. Interestingly, the phenotype is more severe when unfractionated bone marrow cells are transplanted, yet neither progenitor cells (Lin(-)Sca-1(-)c-kit(+)), nor mature granulocytes (CD11b(+)Gr-1(+)), nor potential stem cell niche cells (CD45(-)Ter119(-)) are able to transmit the disease or alter the phenotype. The phenotype is largely independent of BCR-ABL priming before transplantation. However, prolonged BCR-ABL expression abrogates the potential of LSK cells to induce full-blown disease in secondary recipients and increases the fraction of multipotent progenitor cells at the expense of long-term hematopoietic stem cells (LT-HSCs) in the bone marrow. BCR-ABL alters the expression of genes involved in proliferation, survival, and hematopoietic development, probably contributing to the reduced LT-HSC frequency within BCR-ABL(+) LSK cells. Reversion of BCR-ABL, or treatment with imatinib, eradicates mature cells, whereas leukemic stem cells persist, giving rise to relapsed chronic myeloid leukemia on reinduction of BCR-ABL, or imatinib withdrawal. Our results suggest that BCR-ABL induces differentiation of LT-HSCs and decreases their self-renewal capacity.
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Relevance of glycine and cysteine residues as well as N- and C-terminals for the activity of protein histidine phosphatase.
Biochim. Biophys. Acta
PUBLISHED: 05-14-2009
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There is increasing evidence that reversible phosphorylation of histidine residues regulates numerous important cellular processes. The first protein histidine phosphatase (PHP) from vertebrates was discovered just recently. Here, we report on amino acids and domains essential for activity of PHP. Point mutations of conserved residues and deletions of the N- and C-termini of PHP were analyzed using [(32)P-his]ATP-citrate lyase as a substrate. Individual or joint replacement of all cysteine residues by alanine did not affect PHP activity. Deletion of 9 N-terminal amino acids resulted in inactive PHP. Furthermore, only 4 C-terminal residues could be deleted without losing PHP activity. Single or multiple mutations of the glycine-rich domain (Gly(75), Gly(77)) of a putative nucleotide binding site of PHP (GxGxxG/S) caused inactivation of PHP. Wildtype PHP could be labeled with [alpha-(32)P]ATP. Such radiolabeling was not detectable for catalytically inactive PHP-G75A and PHP-G77A. These data suggest further studies on the interaction between PHP and ATP.
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Cyclin A1 regulates WT1 expression in acute myeloid leukemia cells.
Int. J. Oncol.
PUBLISHED: 02-25-2009
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Cyclin A1 is a cell cycle protein that is expressed in testes, brain and CD34-positive hematopoietic progenitor cells. Cyclin A1 is overexpressed in a variety of myeloid leukemic cell lines and in myeloid leukemic blasts. Transgenic cyclin A1 overexpressing mice develop acute myeloid leukemia with low frequency. In this study, we looked for putative target genes of cyclin A1 in hematopoietic cells. Microarray analysis of U937 myeloid cells overexpressing cyclin A1 versus conrol cells detected 35 differential expressed genes, 21 induced and 14 repressed ones upon cyclin A1 overexpression. Among the differentially expressed genes WT1 was chosen for further analysis. Repression of WT1 expression was confirmed on the mRNA and protein level. In addition, WT1 expression was higher in bone marrow, liver and ovary of cyclin A1-/- mice. Isoform analysis showed a profound change of the WT1 isoform ratio in U937 cyclin A1-overexpressing versus control cells. Functional analysis revealed an inhibition of colony growth when WT1 isoforms were transfected into U937 cells, which was not affected by the overexpression of cyclin A1. In addition, overexpression of the WT1-/+ isoform induced a G1 cell cycle arrest which was abrogated upon cotransfection with cyclin A1. This study identified WT1 as a repressed target of cyclin A1 and suggests that the suppression of WT1 in cyclin A1-overexpressing leukemias might play a role in the growth and suppression of apoptosis in these leukemic cells.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

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We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

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In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.