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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Magnetic sphincter augmentation with the LINX device for gastroesophageal reflux disease after U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval.
Am Surg
PUBLISHED: 09-30-2014
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Magnetic sphincter augmentation (MSA) of the gastroesophageal junction with the LINX Reflux Management System is an alternative to fundoplication for gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) that was approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in March 2012. This is a prospective observational study of all patients who underwent placement of the LINX at two institutions from April 2012 to December 2013 to evaluate our clinical experience with the LINX device after FDA approval. There were no intraoperative complications and only four mild postoperative morbidities: three urinary retentions and one readmission for dehydration. The mean operative time was 60 minutes (range, 31 to 159 minutes) and mean length of stay was 11 hours (range, 5 to 35 hours). GERD health-related quality-of-life scores were available for 83 per cent of patients with a median follow-up of five months (range, 3 to 14 months) and a median score of four (range, 0 to 26). A total of 76.9 per cent of patients were no longer taking proton pump inhibitors. The most common postoperative complaint was dysphagia, which resolved in 79.1 per cent of patients with a median time to resolution of eight weeks. There were eight patients with persistent dysphagia that required balloon dilation with improvement in symptoms. MSA with LINX is a safe and effective alternative to fundoplication for treatment of GERD. The most common postoperative complaint is mild to moderate dysphagia, which usually resolves within 12 weeks.
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Targeting PARP-1 Allosteric Regulation Offers Therapeutic Potential against Cancer.
Cancer Res.
PUBLISHED: 11-04-2013
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PARP-1 is a nuclear protein that has important roles in maintenance of genomic integrity. During genotoxic stress, PARP-1 recruits to sites of DNA damage where PARP-1 domain architecture initiates catalytic activation and subsequent poly(ADP-ribose)-dependent DNA repair. PARP-1 inhibition is a promising new way to selectively target cancers harboring DNA repair deficiencies. However, current inhibitors target other PARPs, raising important questions about long-term off-target effects. Here, we propose a new strategy that targets PARP-1 allosteric regulation as a selective way of inhibiting PARP-1. We found that disruption of PARP-1 domain-domain contacts through mutagenesis held no cellular consequences on recruitment to DNA damage or a model system of transcriptional regulation, but prevented DNA-damage-dependent catalytic activation. Furthermore, PARP-1 mutant overexpression in a pancreatic cancer cell line (MIA PaCa-2) increased sensitivity to platinum-based anticancer agents. These results not only highlight the potential of a synergistic drug combination of allosteric PARP inhibitors with DNA-damaging agents in genomically unstable cancer cells (regardless of homologous recombination status), but also signify important applications of selective PARP-1 inhibition. Finally, the development of a high-throughput PARP-1 assay is described as a tool to promote discovery of novel PARP-1 selective inhibitors. Cancer Res; 1-7. ©2013 AACR.
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Outcomes following laparoscopic transhiatal esophagectomy for esophageal cancer.
Surg Endosc
PUBLISHED: 05-12-2013
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Most published minimally invasive esophagectomy techniques involve a multiple field approach, including laparoscopic and thoracoscopic esophageal mobilization. Laparoscopic transhiatal esophagectomy (LTE) should potentially reduce the complications associated with thoracotomy. This study aims to compare outcomes of LTE with open transhiatal esophagectomy (OTE) and en-bloc esophagectomy (EBE).
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pp32 (ANP32A) expression inhibits pancreatic cancer cell growth and induces gemcitabine resistance by disrupting HuR binding to mRNAs.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 07-26-2010
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The expression of protein phosphatase 32 (PP32, ANP32A) is low in poorly differentiated pancreatic cancers and is linked to the levels of HuR (ELAV1), a predictive marker for gemcitabine response. In pancreatic cancer cells, exogenous overexpression of pp32 inhibited cell growth, supporting its long-recognized role as a tumor suppressor in pancreatic cancer. In chemotherapeutic sensitivity screening assays, cells overexpressing pp32 were selectively resistant to the nucleoside analogs gemcitabine and cytarabine (ARA-C), but were sensitized to 5-fluorouracil; conversely, silencing pp32 in pancreatic cancer cells enhanced gemcitabine sensitivity. The cytoplasmic levels of pp32 increased after cancer cells are treated with certain stressors, including gemcitabine. pp32 overexpression reduced the association of HuR with the mRNA encoding the gemcitabine-metabolizing enzyme deoxycytidine kinase (dCK), causing a significant reduction in dCK protein levels. Similarly, ectopic pp32 expression caused a reduction in HuR binding of mRNAs encoding tumor-promoting proteins (e.g., VEGF and HuR), while silencing pp32 dramatically enhanced the binding of these mRNA targets. Low pp32 nuclear expression correlated with high-grade tumors and the presence of lymph node metastasis, as compared to patients tumors with high nuclear pp32 expression. Although pp32 expression levels did not enhance the predictive power of cytoplasmic HuR status, nuclear pp32 levels and cytoplasmic HuR levels associated significantly in patient samples. Thus, we provide novel evidence that the tumor suppressor function of pp32 can be attributed to its ability to disrupt HuR binding to target mRNAs encoding key proteins for cancer cell survival and drug efficacy.
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Transgastric large-organ extraction: the initial human experience.
Surg Endosc
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In laparoscopy, it often is the case that port sites are enlarged for specimen extraction. This leads to higher risk of trocar site complications, such as infection or incisional hernia. Natural orifice surgery (NOTES) is beneficial for minimizing these complications, and this is emphasized when the extracted specimen is of large volume. We have been using transgastric technique for appendectomy, cholecystectomy, and laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG). Of these transgastric operations, we focus on the one with relatively large-organ extraction: LSG with transoral remnant extraction (TORE). We describe the details and feasibility of this procedure and compare the outcomes to conventional LSG.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.