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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Breastfeeding and wheeze prevalence in pre-schoolers and pre-adolescents: the Genesis and Healthy Growth studies.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol
PUBLISHED: 10-22-2013
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To date, extensive research has been undertaken on a potential link of breastfeeding (BF) to wheezing illnesses. Nevertheless, an association remains to be established, partly due to age-dependent discrepancies and different definitions of exposures/outcomes across studies. We thus investigated the relation of diverse infantile feeding patterns with wheeze/asthma prevalence in two cohorts of children of different ages (preschool and preadolescent).
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Pediatric Allergic Rhinitis and Asthma: Can the March be Halted?
Paediatr Drugs
PUBLISHED: 08-20-2013
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The strong epidemiologic and pathophysiologic link between allergic rhinitis (AR) and asthma has led to the concept of united airways disease or respiratory allergy, implying that allergy, in its widest sense, underlies this clinical syndrome. Progression from AR to asthma is frequent and part of the atopic march. Since pediatric immune responses are more adaptable and therefore may be more amenable to treatment, interventions at early childhood are characterized by a higher chance to affect the natural history of respiratory allergy. Although current treatments are quite effective in alleviating respiratory allergy symptoms, it has proven much more difficult to confirm any influence on the progression of the disease. Much more promising is the field of specific allergen immunotherapy, where current evidence, although not yet of ideal robustness, points towards a disease-modifying effect. In addition, newer or emerging, possibly more effective or more targeted interventions are promising in the preventive sense.
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A molecular diagnostic algorithm to guide pollen immunotherapy in southern Europe: towards component-resolved management of allergic diseases.
Int. Arch. Allergy Immunol.
PUBLISHED: 02-20-2013
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Correct identification of the culprit allergen is an essential part of diagnosis and treatment in immunoglobulin E (IgE)-mediated allergic diseases. In recent years, molecular biology has made important advances facilitating such identification and overcoming some of the drawbacks of natural allergen extracts, which consist of mixtures of various proteins that may be allergenic or not, specific for the allergen source or widely distributed (panallergens). New technologies offer the opportunity for a more accurate component-resolved diagnosis, of benefit especially to polysensitized allergic patients. The basic elements of molecular diagnostics with potential relevance to immunotherapy prescription are reviewed here, with a focus on Southern European sensitization patterns to pollen allergens. We propose a basic algorithm regarding component-resolved diagnostic work-up for pollen allergen-specific immunotherapy candidates in Southern Europe; this and similar algorithms can form the basis of improved patient management, conceptually a Component-Resolved Allergy Management.
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Risk of allergic reactions to wine, in milk, egg and fish-allergic patients.
Clin Transl Allergy
PUBLISHED: 06-07-2011
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European legislators and wine producers still debate on the requirement for labeling of wines fined with potentially allergenic food proteins (casein, egg white or fish-derived isinglass). We investigated whether wines fined with known concentrations of these proteins have the potential to provoke clinical allergic reactions in relevant patients.
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A 5-year venom immunotherapy protocol with 50 ?g maintenance dose: safety and efficacy in school children.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol
PUBLISHED: 01-16-2011
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Venom immunotherapy (VIT) has been shown to be an effective and safe treatment for preventing sting-induced anaphylaxis in patients with systemic reactions to hymenoptera stings. A remaining problem is the relative effectiveness and safety of different immunotherapy protocols used with respect to maintenance dose, injection interval, and duration.
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Association of passive exposure of pregnant women to environmental tobacco smoke with asthma symptoms in children.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol
PUBLISHED: 08-14-2009
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Environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) is a significant risk factor for the presence and increased severity of asthma- and allergy-related symptoms in children. Smoking during pregnancy has detrimental effects on asthma-associated outcomes in childhood. Whether passive exposure of pregnant women to ETS may also lead to asthma in their offspring, is not known. The aim of this study was to investigate the association of passive exposure of pregnant women to ETS and asthma- and/or allergy-related symptoms in Preschool children. Cross-sectional data were collected with questionnaires from 2374 Preschool children, recruited from public and private nurseries and day-care centers. Parental smoking was significantly associated with wheezing symptoms in their children. Mothers active smoking during pregnancy significantly increased the risk for occurrence of asthma symptoms and/or medically diagnosed asthma in Preschool children in a dose-dependent manner. Passive exposure to ETS, mainly during the third trimester of pregnancy, was significantly associated with asthma- and allergy-related symptoms after adjusting for several confounders in a multivariate analysis (current wheeze: OR = 1.42, 95% CI = 1.06-1.91, pruritic rash ever: OR= 1.45, 95% CI = 1.01-2.08). Passive exposure of pregnant women to ETS during the third trimester is positively associated with asthma- and allergy-related symptoms in their Preschool age children. Public health policies should be oriented not only towards smoking cessation, but also reinforce elimination of ETS exposure of pregnant women.
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Research needs in allergy: an EAACI position paper, in collaboration with EFA.
Nikolaos G Papadopoulos, Ioana Agache, Sevim Bavbek, Beatrice M Bilo, Fulvio Braido, Victòria Cardona, Adnan Custovic, Jan Demonchy, Pascal Demoly, Philippe Eigenmann, Jacques Gayraud, Clive Grattan, Enrico Heffler, Peter W Hellings, Marek Jutel, Edward Knol, Jan Lötvall, Antonella Muraro, Lars K Poulsen, Graham Roberts, Peter Schmid-Grendelmeier, Chrysanthi Skevaki, Massimo Triggiani, Ronald Vanree, Thomas Werfel, Breda Flood, Susanna Palkonen, Roberta Savli, Pia Allegri, Isabella Annesi-Maesano, Francesco Annunziato, Dario Antolin-Amerigo, Christian Apfelbacher, Miguel Blanca, Ewa Bogacka, Patrizia Bonadonna, Matteo Bonini, Onur Boyman, Knut Brockow, Peter Burney, Jeroen Buters, Indre Butiene, Moises Calderon, Lars Olaf Cardell, Jean-Christoph Caubet, Sevcan Celenk, Ewa Cichocka-Jarosz, Cemal Cingi, Mariana Couto, Nicolette Dejong, Stefano Del Giacco, Nikolaos Douladiris, Filippo Fassio, Jean-Luc Fauquert, Javier Fernández, Montserrat Fernandez Rivas, Marta Ferrer, Carsten Flohr, James Gardner, Jon Genuneit, Philippe Gevaert, Anna Groblewska, Eckard Hamelmann, Hans Jürgen Hoffmann, Karin Hoffmann-Sommergruber, Lilit Hovhannisyan, Valérie Hox, Frode L Jahnsen, Omer Kalayci, Ayse Füsun Kalpaklioglu, Jörg Kleine-Tebbe, George Konstantinou, Marcin Kurowski, Susanne Lau, Roger Lauener, Antti Lauerma, Kirsty Logan, Antoine Magnan, Joanna Makowska, Heidi Makrinioti, Paraskevi Mangina, Felicia Manole, Adriano Mari, Angel Mazon, Clare Mills, Ervinç Mingomataj, Bodo Niggemann, Gunnar Nilsson, Markus Ollert, Liam O'Mahony, Serena O'Neil, Gianni Pala, Alberto Papi, Gianni Passalacqua, Michael Perkin, Oliver Pfaar, Constantinos Pitsios, Santiago Quirce, Ulrike Raap, Monika Raulf-Heimsoth, Claudio Rhyner, Paula Robson-Ansley, Rodrigo Rodrigues Alves, Zeljka Roje, Carmen Rondón, Odilija Rudzeviciene, Franziska Rueff, Maia Rukhadze, Gabriele Rumi, Cansin Sackesen, Alexandra F Santos, Annalisa Santucci, Christian Scharf, Carsten Schmidt-Weber, Benno Schnyder, Jürgen Schwarze, Gianenrico Senna, Svetlana Sergejeva, Sven Seys, Andrea Siracusa, Isabel Skypala, Milena Sokolowska, François Spertini, Radoslaw Spiewak, Aline Sprikkelman, Gunter Sturm, Ines Swoboda, Ingrid Terreehorst, Elina Toskala, Claudia Traidl-Hoffmann, Carina Venter, Berber Vlieg-Boerstra, Paul Whitacker, Margitta Worm, Paraskevi Xepapadaki, Cezmi A Akdis.
Clin Transl Allergy
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In less than half a century, allergy, originally perceived as a rare disease, has become a major public health threat, today affecting the lives of more than 60 million people in Europe, and probably close to one billion worldwide, thereby heavily impacting the budgets of public health systems. More disturbingly, its prevalence and impact are on the rise, a development that has been associated with environmental and lifestyle changes accompanying the continuous process of urbanization and globalization. Therefore, there is an urgent need to prioritize and concert research efforts in the field of allergy, in order to achieve sustainable results on prevention, diagnosis and treatment of this most prevalent chronic disease of the 21st century.The European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (EAACI) is the leading professional organization in the field of allergy, promoting excellence in clinical care, education, training and basic and translational research, all with the ultimate goal of improving the health of allergic patients. The European Federation of Allergy and Airways Diseases Patients Associations (EFA) is a non-profit network of allergy, asthma and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disorder (COPD) patients organizations. In support of their missions, the present EAACI Position Paper, in collaboration with EFA, highlights the most important research needs in the field of allergy to serve as key recommendations for future research funding at the national and European levels.Although allergies may involve almost every organ of the body and an array of diverse external factors act as triggers, there are several common themes that need to be prioritized in research efforts. As in many other chronic diseases, effective prevention, curative treatment and accurate, rapid diagnosis represent major unmet needs. Detailed phenotyping/endotyping stands out as widely required in order to arrange or re-categorize clinical syndromes into more coherent, uniform and treatment-responsive groups. Research efforts to unveil the basic pathophysiologic pathways and mechanisms, thus leading to the comprehension and resolution of the pathophysiologic complexity of allergies will allow for the design of novel patient-oriented diagnostic and treatment protocols. Several allergic diseases require well-controlled epidemiological description and surveillance, using disease registries, pharmacoeconomic evaluation, as well as large biobanks. Additionally, there is a need for extensive studies to bring promising new biotechnological innovations, such as biological agents, vaccines of modified allergen molecules and engineered components for allergy diagnosis, closer to clinical practice. Finally, particular attention should be paid to the difficult-to-manage, precarious and costly severe disease forms and/or exacerbations. Nonetheless, currently arising treatments, mainly in the fields of immunotherapy and biologicals, hold great promise for targeted and causal management of allergic conditions. Active involvement of all stakeholders, including Patient Organizations and policy makers are necessary to achieve the aims emphasized herein.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.