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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
The role of homeostatic regulation between tumor suppressor DAB2IP and oncogenic Skp2 in prostate cancer growth.
Oncotarget
PUBLISHED: 08-14-2014
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Altered DAB2IP gene expression often detected in prostate cancer (PCa) is due to epigenetic silencing. In this study, we unveil a new mechanism leading to the loss of DAB2IP protein; an oncogenic S-phase kinase-associated protein-2 (Skp2) as E3 ubiquitin ligase plays a key regulator in DAB2IP degradation. In order to unveil the role of Skp2 in the turnover of DAB2IP protein, both prostate cell lines and prostate cancer specimens with a variety of molecular and cell biologic techniques were employed. We demonstrated that DAB2IP is regulated by Skp2-mediated proteasome degradation in the prostate cell lines. Further analyses identified the N-terminal DAB2IP containing the ubiquitination site. Immunohistochemical study exhibited an inverse correlation between DAB2IP and Skp2 protein expression in the prostate cancer tissue microarray. In contrast, DAB2IP can suppressSkp2 protein expression is mediated through Akt signaling. The reciprocal regulation between DAB2IP and Skp2 can impact on the growth of PCa cells. This reciprocal regulation between DAB2IP and Skp2 protein represents a unique homeostatic balance between tumor suppressor and oncoprotein in normal prostate epithelia, which is apparently altered in cancer cells. The outcome of this study has identified new potential targets for developing new therapeutic strategy for PCa.
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Mechanisms of androgen receptor activation in castration-resistant prostate cancer.
Endocrinology
PUBLISHED: 09-03-2013
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Systemic treatment of advanced prostate cancer is initiated with androgen deprivation therapy by gonadal testosterone depletion. Response durations are variable and tumors nearly always become resistant as castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), which is driven, at least in part, by a continued dependence on the androgen receptor (AR). The proposed mechanisms that underlie AR function in this clinical setting are quite varied. These include intratumoral synthesis of androgens from inactive precursors, increased AR expression, AR activation through tyrosine kinase-dependent signaling, alterations in steroid receptor coactivators, and expression of a truncated AR with constitutive activity. Various pharmacologic interventions have clinically validated some of these mechanisms, such as those that require the AR ligand-binding domain. Clinical studies have failed to validate other mechanisms, and additional mechanisms have yet to be tested in patients with CRPC. Here, we review the mechanisms that elicit AR activity in CRPC, with a particular focus on recent developments.
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A gain-of-function mutation in DHT synthesis in castration-resistant prostate cancer.
Cell
PUBLISHED: 05-10-2013
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Growth of prostate cancer cells is dependent upon androgen stimulation of the androgen receptor (AR). Dihydrotestosterone (DHT), the most potent androgen, is usually synthesized in the prostate from testosterone secreted by the testis. Following chemical or surgical castration, prostate cancers usually shrink owing to testosterone deprivation. However, tumors often recur, forming castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Here, we show that CRPC sometimes expresses a gain-of-stability mutation that leads to a gain-of-function in 3?-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (3?HSD1), which catalyzes the initial rate-limiting step in conversion of the adrenal-derived steroid dehydroepiandrosterone to DHT. The mutation (N367T) does not affect catalytic function, but it renders the enzyme resistant to ubiquitination and degradation, leading to profound accumulation. Whereas dehydroepiandrosterone conversion to DHT is usually very limited, expression of 367T accelerates this conversion and provides the DHT necessary to activate the AR. We suggest that 3?HSD1 is a valid target for the treatment of CRPC.
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Molecular dynamics simulation of the motion of colloidal nanoparticles in a solute concentration gradient and a comparison to the continuum limit.
Phys. Rev. Lett.
PUBLISHED: 04-22-2013
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Chemical-mechanical transduction mechanisms which can actuate the movement of colloids through liquids are highly sought after as engines to propel miniaturized micro- and nanobots. One mechanism involves harnessing the long-range van der Waals attractive forces between the colloid and solute molecules dissolved in the liquid around the particle. If a concentration gradient of this solute is applied across the particle, then the imbalance in the van der Waals attraction drives the particle towards the higher concentration of solute. We present a molecular dynamics simulation using Lennard-Jones interactions between molecules of the solvent, solute, and colloid cluster which include short-range repulsive and long-range attractive potentials. The simulations demonstrate that a solute gradient can propel nanosized colloids, and that the velocity decreases with the colloid size. The solute-colloid short-range repulsive interactions are observed to be restricted to a region of specifically adsorbed solutes on the particle surface which are symmetrically adsorbed and do not contribute to the motion. The size of this region provides a cutoff for a continuum level description of the motion, and with this cutoff, continuum calculations are in excellent agreement with the molecular dynamics simulation results, completing a description of the propulsion from the nano- to the microscale.
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Minireview: Androgen metabolism in castration-resistant prostate cancer.
Mol. Endocrinol.
PUBLISHED: 04-16-2013
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The decades-old terminology of androgen independence has been replaced in recent years with castration-resistant prostate cancer. Biological and clinical evidence have together conspired to support the use of this revised terminology by demonstrating that in the vast majority of cases tumors are neither truly depleted of androgens, nor are they free of the requirement for androgens to sustain growth and progression. Abiraterone acetate, an androgen synthesis inhibitor, and enzalutamide, a potent androgen receptor antagonist, both exploit the continued requirement for androgens. A central question, given the therapeutic gains enabled by further suppression of the androgen axis with these newer agents, is whether there may be additional clinical benefit gained by moving the goal posts of androgen suppression even further. The answer lies in part with the mechanisms utilized by tumors that enable resistance to these therapies. The aims of this review were to give a broad outline of steroidogenesis in prostate cancer and to highlight recent developments in understanding resistance to hormonal therapies.
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Molecular pathways: Inhibiting steroid biosynthesis in prostate cancer.
Clin. Cancer Res.
PUBLISHED: 03-07-2013
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A significant proportion of castration-resistant prostate cancers (CRPC) remains driven by ligand activation of the androgen receptor. Although the testes are the primary source of testosterone, testosterone can also be produced from peripheral conversion of adrenal sex hormone precursors DHEA and androstenedione in the prostate and other tissues. CYP17A1 catalyzes two essential reactions in the production of DHEA and androstenedione: the hydroxylation (hydroxylase activity) and the subsequent cleavage of the C17-20 side chain (lyase activity). Potent and selective inhibition of CYP17A1 by abiraterone depletes residual nongonadal androgens and is an effective treatment for CRPC. Elucidation of the mechanisms that underlie resistance to abiraterone will inform the development of novel therapeutic strategies post-abiraterone. Preclinical evidence that androgen biosynthesis in prostate cancer cells does not necessarily follow a single dominant pathway, and residual androgens or alternative ligands (including administered glucocorticoids) can reactivate androgen receptor signaling, supports cotargeting of more than one enzyme involved in steroidogenesis and combining a CYP17A1 inhibitor with an antiandrogen. Furthermore, given the drawbacks of 17?-hydroxylase inhibition, there is considerable interest in developing new CYP17A1 inhibitors that more specifically inhibit lyase activity and are therefore less likely to require glucocorticoid coadministration.
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SOD mimetics: a novel class of androgen receptor inhibitors that suppresses castration-resistant growth of prostate cancer.
Mol. Cancer Ther.
PUBLISHED: 12-15-2011
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Advanced prostate cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths among American men. The androgen receptor (AR) is vital for prostate cancer progression, even in the face of castrate levels of serum testosterone following androgen ablation therapy, a mainstay therapy for advanced prostate cancer. Downregulation of superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2), a major intracellular antioxidant enzyme, occurs progressively during prostate cancer progression to advanced states and is known to promote AR activity in prostate cancer. Therefore, this study investigated the effects of SOD mimetics on AR expression and function in AR-dependent LNCaP, CWR22Rv1, and LAPC-4AD prostate cancer cells. Treatment with Tempol (4-hydroxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-N-oxyl), a SOD mimetic, not only lowered cellular superoxide levels but also concomitantly attenuated AR transcriptional activity and AR target gene expression in a dose- and time-dependent manner, in the presence and absence of dihydrotestosterone, the major endogenous AR agonist. Inhibition of AR by Tempol was mediated, in large part, by its ability to decrease AR protein via increased degradation, in the absence of any inhibitory effects on other nuclear receptors. Inhibitory effects of Tempol on AR were also reproducible with other SOD mimetics, MnTBAP and MnTMPyP. Importantly, effects of Tempol on AR function were accompanied by significant in vitro and in vivo reduction in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) survival and growth. Collectively, this study has shown for the first time that SOD mimetics, by virtue of their ability to suppress AR function, may be beneficial in treating the currently incurable CRPC, in which SOD2 expression is highly suppressed.
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Dihydrotestosterone synthesis bypasses testosterone to drive castration-resistant prostate cancer.
Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A.
PUBLISHED: 07-27-2011
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In the majority of cases, advanced prostate cancer responds initially to androgen deprivation therapy by depletion of gonadal testosterone. The response is usually transient, and metastatic tumors almost invariably eventually progress as castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). The development of CRPC is dependent upon the intratumoral generation of the potent androgen, dihydrotestosterone (DHT), from adrenal precursor steroids. Progression to CRPC is accompanied by increased expression of steroid-5?-reductase isoenzyme-1 (SRD5A1) over SRD5A2, which is otherwise the dominant isoenzyme expressed in the prostate. DHT synthesis in CRPC is widely assumed to require 5?-reduction of testosterone as the obligate precursor, and the increased expression of SRD5A1 is thought to reflect its role in converting testosterone to DHT. Here, we show that the dominant route of DHT synthesis in CRPC bypasses testosterone, and instead requires 5?-reduction of androstenedione by SRD5A1 to 5?-androstanedione, which is then converted to DHT. This alternative pathway is operational and dominant in both human CRPC cell lines and fresh tissue obtained from human tumor metastases. Moreover, CRPC growth in mouse xenograft models is dependent upon this pathway, as well as expression of SRD5A1. These findings reframe the fundamental metabolic pathway that drives CRPC progression, and shed light on the development of new therapeutic strategies.
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SLCO2B1 and SLCO1B3 may determine time to progression for patients receiving androgen deprivation therapy for prostate cancer.
J. Clin. Oncol.
PUBLISHED: 05-23-2011
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Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT), an important treatment for advanced prostate cancer, is highly variable in its effectiveness. We hypothesized that genetic variants of androgen transporter genes, SLCO2B1 and SLCO1B3, may determine time to progression on ADT.
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"Getting from here to there"--mechanisms and limitations to the activation of the androgen receptor in castration-resistant prostate cancer.
J. Investig. Med.
PUBLISHED: 10-30-2010
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Despite the clinical regression that typifies the initial response of advanced prostate cancer to gonadal testosterone depletion, tumors eventually progress. However, evidence supports the concept that signaling via the androgen receptor (AR) is important in progression to castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC).Steroid hormones are synthesized from cholesterol in a series of tightly regulated steps involving the cleavage of carbon-carbon bonds, the introduction of functional groups derived from activated molecular oxygen, and the oxidation and reduction of carbon-carbon and carbon-oxygen bonds. In the adrenal cortex and gonads, steroidogenesis is tightly regulated, very efficient, and highly directional. In contrast, steroid metabolism in peripheral tissues is characterized by competing enzymes and pathways, low efficiency, and great variability. Many steps are mechanistically and functionally irreversible, but some are not, and the repertoire of specific enzymes, intracellular redox state, and access to hormone precursors all contribute to steroid flux and accumulation.The investigation of steroid metabolizing enzymes in CRPC often assumes that the pathways and the patterns of metabolism mirror those defined in the adrenals and the gonads and validated by human deficiency syndromes. Unfortunately, several potential pathways using different enzymes might contribute substantially to androgen synthesis in CRPC. Finally, a number of mechanisms have been reported by which the AR is activated independent of ligand. Recent observations have suggested that AR forms with constitutive activity occur in CRPC, stimulating transcription without a requirement for ligand. This overview outlines a broad view of how the mechanisms by which the AR may be activated, whether by alternate pathways of androgen synthesis or the production of alternate forms of the AR, with an emphasis on what aspects must be accounted for when using model systems to explore the biology of human prostate cancer.
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Survivin is not induced by novel taxanes.
Mol. Pharm.
PUBLISHED: 10-07-2010
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Taxanes are a critical component of chemotherapy for breast, prostate, lung and other cancers. Initial or acquired tumor resistance to taxanes is therefore one of the most important issues in oncology. Survivin is a prosurvival gene whose expression is a poor prognostic feature. Survivin is induced acutely upon exposure to taxanes and coordinates resistance to taxane-mediated cell death, although the exact mechanism of taxane-mediated survivin induction is not clear. Here, we describe the synthesis of a series of novel taxanes, with modifications on the 7- or 10-position of the taxane backbone, as well as the side chain. We found that the novel taxanes with modifications at the 10-position have robust tubulin binding and tubulin polymerization activity. Gene expression profiling and quantitative PCR of cells treated with the 10-position conjugates reveals that the effect of treatment with a subset of these novel taxanes lacks a gene expression signature, including survivin induction, which is characteristically induced with paclitaxel treatment. Furthermore, we show that this gene expression signature is not due to differences in G2/M arrest. Cell sensitivity studies suggest that the inability to induce survivin is associated with increased drug cytotoxicity and apoptosis. This work suggests that taxanes that effectively bind tubulin need not invariably induce survivin as a mechanism of drug resistance.
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3beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase is a possible pharmacological target in the treatment of castration-resistant prostate cancer.
Endocrinology
PUBLISHED: 06-09-2010
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Prostate cancer usually responds to androgen deprivation therapy, although the response in metastatic disease is almost always transient and tumors eventually progress as castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). CRPC continues to be driven by testosterone or dihydrotestosterone from intratumoral metabolism of 19-carbon adrenal steroids from circulation, and/or de novo intratumoral steroidogenesis. Both mechanisms require 3beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3betaHSD) metabolism of Delta(5)-steroids, including dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and Delta(5)-androstenediol (A5diol), to testosterone. In contrast, reports that DHEA and A5diol directly activate the androgen receptor (AR) suggest that 3betaHSD metabolism is not required and that 3betaHSD inhibitors would be ineffective in the treatment of CRPC. We hypothesized that activation of AR in prostate cancer by DHEA and A5diol requires their conversion via 3betaHSD to androstenedione and testosterone, respectively. Here, we show that DHEA and A5diol induce AR chromatin occupancy and AR-regulated genes. Furthermore, we show that Delta(5)-androgens undergo 3beta-dehydrogenation in prostate cancer and that induction of AR nuclear translocation, AR chromatin occupancy, transcription of PSA, TMPRSS2, and FKBP5, as well as cell proliferation by DHEA and A5diol, are all blocked by inhibitors of 3betaHSD. These findings demonstrate that DHEA and A5diol must be metabolized by 3betaHSD to activate AR in these models of CRPC. Furthermore, this work suggests that 3betaHSD may be exploited as a pharmacologic target in the treatment of CRPC.
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New agents and strategies for the hormonal treatment of castration-resistant prostate cancer.
Expert Opin Investig Drugs
PUBLISHED: 06-08-2010
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Hormonal therapy with medical or surgical castration is the mainstay of systemic therapy for advanced prostate cancer. Depletion of gonadal testosterone in circulation is typically initially effective, although responses are transient and metastatic disease progresses as castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC).
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More than an accessory: implications of type III transforming growth factor-beta receptor loss in prostate cancer.
BJU Int.
PUBLISHED: 01-08-2010
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The type III transforming growth factor-beta receptor (TGFbetaR3, betaglycan), a tumour suppressor, is the most frequently lost TGFbeta pathway component. This event appears to be very important in the transition of the TGFbeta pathway from having tumour-suppressor activity in early prostate tumour development, to having tumour-promoting activity in metastatic disease. Moreover, loss of the TGFbetaR3 can also affect the cellular response towards testosterone, inhibin/activin, and dysregulate growth-factor pathways that mediate growth and angiogenesis. In this review we discuss how TGFbetaR3 normally functions as an accessory protein in the TGFbeta pathway, how its loss is related to tumour progression, and the treatment implications of TGFbetaR3 loss in individuals with prostate cancer.
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An update on androgen deprivation therapy for prostate cancer.
Endocr. Relat. Cancer
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2010
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Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) with gonadal testosterone depletion is the frontline treatment for advanced prostate cancer. Other hormonal interventions have a role in the treatment of prostate cancer. We sought to examine systematically the evidence for hormonal interventions in prostate cancer, risks of ADT, and interventions that mitigate these risks. Search results for therapeutic studies were focused primarily on randomized controlled clinical trials, and the Jadad scale criteria were used to evaluate the quality of these studies. Four trials of the efficacy of intermittent ADT versus continuous ADT were included. One randomized study analysis and six postrandomization analyses were included on the effects of ADT on cardiovascular mortality. Seven randomized controlled trials of pharmacologic interventions were included for the treatment of metabolic effects due to ADT. One randomized trial of GnRH antagonist versus GnRH agonist was included. Six phase I/II clinical trials of secondary hormonal therapies with novel mechanisms of action were included. Randomized studies completed to date indicate that intermittent ADT might be equivalent to continuous ADT. Although adverse effects of ADT include risk factors for cardiovascular disease, effects on cardiovascular mortality are uncertain. Bone loss and increased risk of fracture may be effectively treated with pharmacologic interventions. Benefits of ADT must be balanced with a consideration of the risks.
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Hormonal therapy for prostate cancer: toward further unraveling of androgen receptor function.
Anticancer Agents Med Chem
PUBLISHED: 07-06-2009
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Prostate cancer is a major cause of cancer-related death in men. Prostate cancer is an androgen-responsive tumor and the treatment of advanced prostate cancer involves hormonal therapy. First-line treatment for advanced prostate cancer is androgen deprivation therapy (ADT), usually with agents that suppress gonadotropins through a pituitary mechanism. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonists and antagonists both suppress gonadal release of testosterone, although their activity profiles vary. ADT down-regulates androgen receptor (AR) transcriptional activity in the tumor but the response in metastatic disease is transient and tumors progress as castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Although serum testosterone concentrations decline dramatically with ADT, CRPC growth remains largely dependent on AR activity. Secondary hormonal therapies are then often employed to further dampen AR-driven transcription. These secondary hormonal therapies either further deplete adrenal or intratumoral androgen synthesis, or directly and competitively antagonize AR. New hormonal agents with both of these mechanisms are in clinical trials and show promising activity in patients with CRPC. Abiraterone acetate is an inhibitor of CYP17, which is an enzyme required for the synthesis of all androgens and estrogens. MDV3100 is an AR antagonist that has a higher affinity for AR than any other AR antagonist in clinic use. In phase I and phase II clinical trials, both agents have significant activity. These agents and the promise of the development of others provide hope that more effective hormonal therapies may soon be offered to patients, which will improve clinical outcomes.
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Commentary: Antioxidants for cancer: new tricks for an old dog?
Oncologist
PUBLISHED: 03-05-2009
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Traditionally, the main focus of the importance of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in oncology is that these species induce DNA damage, leading to a predisposition to cancer. However, it has recently been shown that ROS may have an alternative activity, by modulating tumor cell signaling. Moreover, tumor cell signaling mediated by ROS is readily reversible upon treatment with antioxidants. This emerging evidence on the molecular effects of antioxidants on tumor cells, along with the evidence that the route of administration of antioxidants in earlier clinical trials for cancer could not achieve pharmacologically effective levels, suggests that antioxidants may serve as bona fide signal transduction modifiers for cancer. A re-examination of the current evidence and further study is clearly warranted.
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Prostate cancer-from steroid transformations to clinical translation.
Nat Rev Urol
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The survival benefit conferred by two hormonal agents in phase III trials has clinically validated the long suspected and now widely recognized phenomenon of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) hormone dependence. Abiraterone inhibits steroid 17?-hydroxylase/17,20-lyase (CYP17A1) and blocks androgen synthesis, whereas enzalutamide directly binds and antagonizes the androgen receptor. Both agents are highly effective against CRPC and significantly prolong survival following docetaxel treatment. However, this clinical validation of the androgen pathway has led to questions regarding the fundamental mechanisms of CRPC, as well as resistance to abiraterone and enzalutamide. Our understanding of the predominant steroid transformation pathways that lead to dihydrotestosterone synthesis in CRPC is evolving. The role of steroidogenesis in the development of resistance to abiraterone and enzalutamide remains uncertain. The specific roles of candidate enzyme targets in the development of resistance to these agents must be defined if we are to identify novel targets for improved pharmacologic therapies.
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Abiraterone inhibits 3?-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase: a rationale for increasing drug exposure in castration-resistant prostate cancer.
Clin. Cancer Res.
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Treatment with abiraterone (abi) acetate prolongs survival in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Resistance to abi invariably occurs, probably due in part to upregulation of steroidogenic enzymes and/or other mechanisms that sustain dihydrotestosterone (DHT) synthesis, which raises the possibility of reversing resistance by concomitant inhibition of other required steroidogenic enzymes. On the basis of the 3?-hydroxyl, ?(5)-structure, we hypothesized that abi also inhibits 3?-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase/isomerase (3?HSD), which is absolutely required for DHT synthesis in CRPC, regardless of origins or routes of synthesis.
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Steroid biosynthesis and prostate cancer.
Steroids
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The pathways of androgen biosynthesis in human beings have been studied for decades, and the major pathways and enzymes responsible for testosterone and dihydrotestosterone synthesis are now well described. Minor or alternate pathways, which might contribute substantially to androgen production in specific states, have also emerged. Likewise, the requirement of androgen for prostate formation and growth date back over a half-century, and the dependence of prostate cancer on androgens has been known and exploited for as long. Despite the success of testicular removal or suppression, androgen receptor antagonists, and androgen synthesis inhibitors in the treatment of prostate cancer, the sources of androgen, their routes of synthesis, and the contributions of various routes remain topics of debate, particularly in castration-resistant disease when circulating androgens are very low. Here we review the major pathways of 19-carbon steroid synthesis in the adrenal and gonad, peripheral pathways to active androgens, and recent data charting flux of androgen precursors in prostate cancer. We are far from a unified understanding of androgen generation in prostate cancer, but the similarities and differences from glandular androgen synthesis that have already emerged provide important clues to designing the next generation of treatments for this common and devastating disease.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

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In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.