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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Genome, transcriptome, and functional analyses of Penicillium expansum provide new insights into secondary metabolism and pathogenicity.
Mol. Plant Microbe Interact.
PUBLISHED: 10-23-2014
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The relationship between secondary metabolism and infection in pathogenic fungi has remained largely elusive. Penicillium comprises a group of plant pathogens with varying host specificities and with the ability to produce a wide array of secondary metabolites. The genomes of three Penicillium expansum strains, the main postharvest pathogen of pome fruit, and one Pencillium italicum strain, a postharvest pathogen of citrus fruit, were sequenced and compared to 24 other fungal species. A genomic analysis of gene clusters responsible for the production of secondary metabolites was performed. Putative virulence factors in P. expansum were identified by means of a transcriptomic analysis of apple fruits during the course of infection. Despite a major genome contraction, P. expansum is the Penicillium species with the largest potential for the production of secondary metabolites. Results using knockout mutants clearly demonstrated that neither patulin nor citrinin are required by P. expansum to successfully infect apples.
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Frequent migration of introduced cucurbit-infecting begomoviruses among Middle Eastern countries.
Virol. J.
PUBLISHED: 06-13-2014
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In the early 2000s, two cucurbit-infecting begomoviruses were introduced into the eastern Mediterranean basin: the Old World Squash leaf curl virus (SLCV) and the New World Watermelon chlorotic stunt virus (WmCSV). These viruses have been emerging in parallel over the last decade in Egypt, Israel, Jordan, Lebanon and Palestine.
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Niche and host-associated functional signatures of the root surface microbiome.
Nat Commun
PUBLISHED: 06-02-2014
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Plant microbiomes are critical to host adaptation and impact plant productivity and health. Root-associated microbiomes vary by soil and host genotype, but the contribution of these factors to community structure and metabolic potential has not been fully addressed. Here we characterize root microbial communities of two disparate agricultural crops grown in the same natural soil in a controlled and replicated experimental system. Metagenomic (genetic potential) analysis identifies a core set of functional genes associated with root colonization in both plant hosts, and metatranscriptomic (functional expression) analysis revealed that most genes enriched in the root zones are expressed. Root colonization requires multiple functional capabilities, and these capabilities are enriched at the community level. Differences between the root-associated microbial communities from different plants are observed at the genus or species level, and are related to root-zone environmental factors.
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De-novo assembly of mango fruit peel transcriptome reveals mechanisms of mango response to hot water treatment.
BMC Genomics
PUBLISHED: 02-13-2014
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The mango belongs to the genus Mangifera, consisting of numerous tropical fruiting trees in the flowering plant family, Anacardiaceae. Postharvest treatment by hot water brushing (HWB) for 15-20 s was introduced commercially to improve fruit quality and reduce postharvest disease. This treatment enabled successful storage for 3-4 weeks at 12°C, with improved color and reduced disease development, but it enhanced lenticel discoloration on the fruit peel. We investigated global gene expression induced in fruit peel by HWB treatment, and identified key genes involved in mechanisms potentially associated with fruit resistance to pathogens, peel color improvement, and development of lenticel discoloration; this might explain the fruit's phenotypic responses.
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Draft Genome Sequence of Alicyclobacillus acidoterrestris Strain ATCC 49025.
Genome Announc
PUBLISHED: 09-07-2013
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Alicyclobacillus acidoterrestris is a spore-forming Gram-positive, thermo-acidophilic, nonpathogenic bacterium which contaminates commercial pasteurized fruit juices. The draft genome sequence for A. acidoterrestris strain ATCC 49025 is reported here, providing genetic data relevant to the successful adaptation and survival of this strain in its ecological niche.
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ROSMETER: a bioinformatic tool for the identification of transcriptomic imprints related to reactive oxygen species type and origin provides new insights into stress responses.
Plant Physiol.
PUBLISHED: 08-06-2013
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The chemical identity of the reactive oxygen species (ROS) and its subcellular origin will leave a specific imprint on the transcriptome response. In order to facilitate the appreciation of ROS signaling, we developed a tool that is tuned to qualify this imprint. Transcriptome data from experiments in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) for which the ROS type and organelle origin are known were compiled into indices and made accessible by a Web-based interface called ROSMETER. The ROSMETER algorithm uses a vector-based algorithm to portray the ROS signature for a given transcriptome. The ROSMETER platform was applied to identify the ROS signatures profiles in transcriptomes of senescing plants and of those exposed to abiotic and biotic stresses. An unexpected highly significant ROS transcriptome signature of mitochondrial stress was detected during the early presymptomatic stages of leaf senescence, which was accompanied by the specific oxidation of mitochondria-targeted redox-sensitive green fluorescent protein probe. The ROSMETER analysis of diverse stresses revealed both commonalties and prominent differences between various abiotic stress conditions, such as salt, cold, ultraviolet light, drought, heat, and pathogens. Interestingly, early responses to the various abiotic stresses clustered together, independent of later responses, and exhibited negative correlations to several ROS indices. In general, the ROS transcriptome signature of abiotic stresses showed limited correlation to a few indices, while biotic stresses showed broad correlation with multiple indices. The ROSMETER platform can assist in formulating hypotheses to delineate the role of ROS in plant acclimation to environmental stress conditions and to elucidate the molecular mechanisms of the oxidative stress response in plants.
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A new cryptic virus belonging to the family Partitiviridae was found in watermelon co-infected with Melon necrotic spot virus.
Virus Genes
PUBLISHED: 05-05-2013
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A novel virus was detected in watermelon plants (Citrullus lanatus Thunb.) infected with Melon necrotic spot virus (MNSV) using SOLiD next-generation sequence analysis. In addition to the expected MSNV genome, two double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) segments of 1,312 and 1,118 bp were also identified and sequenced from the purified virus preparations. These two dsRNA segments encode two putative partitivirus-related proteins, an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRP) and a capsid protein, which were sequenced. Genomic-sequence analysis and analysis of phylogenetic relationships indicate that these two dsRNAs together make up the genome of a novel Partitivirus. This virus was found to be closely related to the Pepper cryptic virus 1 and Raphanus sativus cryptic virus. It is suggested that this novel virus putatively named Citrullus lanatus cryptic virus be considered as a new member of the family Partitiviridae.
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De-novo assembly and characterization of the transcriptome of Metschnikowia fructicola reveals differences in gene expression following interaction with Penicillium digitatum and grapefruit peel.
BMC Genomics
PUBLISHED: 02-25-2013
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The yeast Metschnikowia fructicola is an antagonist with biological control activity against postharvest diseases of several fruits. We performed a transcriptome analysis, using RNA-Seq technology, to examine the response of M. fructicola with citrus fruit and with the postharvest pathogen, Penicillium digitatum.
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Comparative genomic analysis indicates that niche adaptation of terrestrial Flavobacteria is strongly linked to plant glycan metabolism.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2013
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Flavobacteria are important members of aquatic and terrestrial bacterial communities, displaying extreme variations in lifestyle, geographical distribution and genome size. They are ubiquitous in soil, but are often strongly enriched in the rhizosphere and phyllosphere of plants. In this study, we compared the genome of a root-associated Flavobacterium that we recently isolated, physiologically characterized and sequenced, to 14 additional Flavobacterium genomes, in order to pinpoint characteristics associated with its high abundance in the rhizosphere. Interestingly, flavobacterial genomes vary in size by approximately two-fold, with terrestrial isolates having predominantly larger genomes than those from aquatic environments. Comparative functional gene analysis revealed that terrestrial and aquatic Flavobacteria generally segregated into two distinct clades. Members of the aquatic clade had a higher ratio of peptide and protein utilization genes, whereas members of the terrestrial clade were characterized by a significantly higher abundance and diversity of genes involved in metabolism of carbohydrates such as xylose, arabinose and pectin. Interestingly, genes encoding glycoside hydrolase (GH) families GH78 and GH106, responsible for rhamnogalacturonan utilization (exclusively associated with terrestrial plant hemicelluloses), were only present in terrestrial clade genomes, suggesting adaptation of the terrestrial strains to plant-related carbohydrate metabolism. The Peptidase/GH ratio of aquatic clade Flavobacteria was significantly higher than that of terrestrial strains (1.7±0.7 and 9.7±4.7, respectively), supporting the concept that this relation can be used to infer Flavobacterium lifestyles. Collectively, our research suggests that terrestrial Flavobacteria are highly adapted to plant carbohydrate metabolism, which appears to be a key to their profusion in plant environments.
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The complete genomic sequence of pepper yellow leaf curl virus (PYLCV) and its implications for our understanding of evolution dynamics in the genus polerovirus.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2013
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We determined the complete sequence and organization of the genome of a putative member of the genus Polerovirus tentatively named Pepper yellow leaf curl virus (PYLCV). PYLCV has a wider host range than Tobacco vein-distorting virus (TVDV) and has a close serological relationship with Cucurbit aphid-borne yellows virus (CABYV) (both poleroviruses). The extracted viral RNA was subjected to SOLiD next-generation sequence analysis and used as a template for reverse transcription synthesis, which was followed by PCR amplification. The ssRNA genome of PYLCV includes 6,028 nucleotides encoding six open reading frames (ORFs), which is typical of the genus Polerovirus. Comparisons of the deduced amino acid sequences of the PYLCV ORFs 2-4 and ORF5, indicate that there are high levels of similarity between these sequences to ORFs 2-4 of TVDV (84-93%) and to ORF5 of CABYV (87%). Both PYLCV and Pepper vein yellowing virus (PeVYV) contain sequences that point to a common ancestral polerovirus. The recombination breakpoint which is located at CABYV ORF3, which encodes the viral coat protein (CP), may explain the CABYV-like sequences found in the genomes of the pepper infecting viruses PYLCV and PeVYV. Two additional regions unique to PYLCV (PY1 and PY2) were identified between nucleotides 4,962 and 5,061 (ORF 5) and between positions 5,866 and 6,028 in the 3 NCR. Sequence analysis of the pepper-infecting PeVYV revealed three unique regions (Pe1-Pe3) with no similarity to other members of the genus Polerovirus. Genomic analyses of PYLCV and PeVYV suggest that the speciation of these viruses occurred through putative recombination event(s) between poleroviruses co-infecting a common host(s), resulting in the emergence of PYLCV, a novel pathogen with a wider host range.
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Maternal worries about child underweight mediate and moderate the relationship between child feeding disorders and mother-child feeding interactions.
J Pediatr Psychol
PUBLISHED: 01-28-2011
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To examine the role of maternal worries about child underweight and undereating in mother-child feeding interactions with children having a feeding disorder (FD).
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Characteristics of transposable element exonization within human and mouse.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 05-06-2010
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Insertion of transposed elements within mammalian genes is thought to be an important contributor to mammalian evolution and speciation. Insertion of transposed elements into introns can lead to their activation as alternatively spliced cassette exons, an event called exonization. Elucidation of the evolutionary constraints that have shaped fixation of transposed elements within human and mouse protein coding genes and subsequent exonization is important for understanding of how the exonization process has affected transcriptome and proteome complexities. Here we show that exonization of transposed elements is biased towards the beginning of the coding sequence in both human and mouse genes. Analysis of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) revealed that exonization of transposed elements can be population-specific, implying that exonizations may enhance divergence and lead to speciation. SNP density analysis revealed differences between Alu and other transposed elements. Finally, we identified cases of primate-specific Alu elements that depend on RNA editing for their exonization. These results shed light on TE fixation and the exonization process within human and mouse genes.
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The role of transposable elements in the evolution of non-mammalian vertebrates and invertebrates.
Genome Biol.
PUBLISHED: 03-17-2010
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Transposable elements (TEs) have played an important role in the diversification and enrichment of mammalian transcriptomes through various mechanisms such as exonization and intronization (the birth of new exons/introns from previously intronic/exonic sequences, respectively), and insertion into first and last exons. However, no extensive analysis has compared the effects of TEs on the transcriptomes of mammals, non-mammalian vertebrates and invertebrates.
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Draft genome sequence of Flavobacterium sp. strain F52, isolated from the rhizosphere of bell pepper (Capsicum annuum L. cv. Maccabi).
J. Bacteriol.
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Here we report the draft genome sequence of Flavobacterium sp. strain F52, isolated from the rhizosphere of bell pepper (Capsicum annuum L. cv. Maccabi). Flavobacterium spp. are ubiquitous in the rhizospheres of agricultural crops; however, little is known about their physiology. To our knowledge, this is the first published genome of a root-associated Flavobacterium strain.
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Genome analysis of bovine-mastitis-associated Escherichia coli O32:H37 strain P4.
J. Bacteriol.
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Escherichia coli is a major pathogen of bovine intramammary infections. Here we report the first draft of the genome sequence of the E. coli O32:H37 P4 strain, which is widely used in experimental bovine mastitis studies.
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Genome assembly of bell pepper endornavirus from small RNA.
J. Virol.
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The family Endornaviridae infects diverse hosts, including plants, fungi, and oomycetes. Here we report for the first time the assembly of bell pepper endornavirus by next-generation sequencing of viral small RNA. Such a population of small RNA indicates the activation of the viral immunity silencing machinery by this cryptic virus, which probably encodes a novel silencing suppressor.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

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We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.