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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
An unbiased approach to identify endogenous substrates of "histone" deacetylase 8.
ACS Chem. Biol.
PUBLISHED: 08-11-2014
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Despite being extensively characterized structurally and biochemically, the functional role of histone deacetylase 8 (HDAC8) has remained largely obscure due in part to a lack of known cellular substrates. Herein, we describe an unbiased approach using chemical tools in conjunction with sophisticated proteomics methods to identify novel non-histone nuclear substrates of HDAC8, including the tumor suppressor ARID1A. These newly discovered substrates of HDAC8 are involved in diverse biological processes including mitosis, transcription, chromatin remodeling, and RNA splicing and may help guide therapeutic strategies that target the function of HDAC8.
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An enzyme-coupled assay measuring acetate production for profiling histone deacetylase specificity.
Anal. Biochem.
PUBLISHED: 02-24-2014
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Histone deacetylases catalyze the hydrolysis of an acetyl group from post-translationally modified acetyl-lysine residues in a wide variety of essential cellular proteins, including histones. Because these lysine modifications can alter the activity and properties of affected proteins, aberrant acetylation/deacetylation may contribute to disease states. Many fundamental questions regarding the substrate specificity and regulation of these enzymes have yet to be answered. Here, we optimize an enzyme-coupled assay to measure low micromolar concentrations of acetate, coupling acetate production to the formation of NADH (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, reduced form) that is measured by changes in either absorbance or fluorescence. Using this assay, we measured the steady-state kinetics of peptides representing the H4 histone tail and demonstrate that a C-terminally conjugated methylcoumarin enhances the catalytic efficiency of deacetylation catalyzed by cobalt(II)-bound histone deacetylase 8 [Co(II)-HDAC8] compared with peptide substrates containing a C-terminal carboxylate, amide, and tryptophan by 50-, 2.8-, and 2.3-fold, respectively. This assay can be adapted for a high-throughput screening format to identify HDAC substrates and inhibitors.
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HDAC8 substrates: Histones and beyond.
Biopolymers
PUBLISHED: 06-26-2013
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The lysine deacetylase family of enzymes (HDACs) was first demonstrated to catalyze deacetylation of acetyllysine residues on histones. In subsequent years, HDACs have been shown to recognize a large pool of acetylated nonhistone proteins as substrates. Recently, thousands of acetylated proteins have been discovered, yet in most cases, the HDAC that catalyzes deacetylation in vivo has not been identified. This gap has created the need for better in vivo, in vitro, and in silico approaches for determining HDAC substrates. While HDAC8 is the best kinetically and structurally characterized HDAC, few efficient substrates have yet been substantiated in vivo. In this review, we delineate factors that may be important for determining HDAC8 substrate recognition and catalytic activity, including structure, complex formation, and post-translational modifications. This summary provides insight into the challenges of identifying in vivo substrates for HDAC8, and provides a good vantage point for understanding the variables important for predicting HDAC substrate recognition. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers 99: 112-126, 2013.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.