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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Emphysema Requires the Receptor for Advanced Glycation End Products Triggering on Structural Cells.
Am. J. Respir. Cell Mol. Biol.
PUBLISHED: 09-04-2014
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Pulmonary emphysema is characterized by persistent inflammation and progressive alveolar destruction. The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) is a multi-ligand cell surface receptor reported to be involved in the process of acute alveolar epithelial cell injury. However, studies that address the role of RAGE in pulmonary emphysema are inconclusive. We investigated the role of RAGE in the development of elastase-induced pulmonary inflammation and emphysema in mice. RAGE sufficient (RAGE+/+) mice and RAGE deficient (RAGE-/-) mice were treated with intratracheal elastase on day 0. Airway inflammation, static compliance (Cst), lung histology and the levels of neutrophil-related chemokine and pro-inflammatory cytokines in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid were determined on days 4 and 21. Neutrophilia in BAL fluid, seen in elastase-treated RAGE+/+ mice, was reduced in elastase-treated RAGE-/- mice on day 4, and was associated with decreased levels of KC, MIP-2 and IL-1?. Cst values and emphysematous changes in the lung tissue were decreased in RAGE-/- mice compared to RAGE+/+ mice on day 21 after elastase treatment. Experiments using irradiated, bone marrow chimeric mice showed that the mice expressing RAGE on radioresistant structural cells but not hematopoietic cells developed elastase-induced neutrophilia and emphysematous change in the lung. In contrast, mice expressing RAGE on hematopoietic cells but not radioresistant structural cells showed reduced neutrophilia and emphysematous change in the lung. These data identify the importance of RAGE expressed on lung structural cells in the development of elastase-induced pulmonary inflammation and emphysema. Thus, RAGE represents a novel therapeutic target for preventing pulmonary emphysema.
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Effect of a cysteinyl leukotriene receptor antagonist on experimental emphysema and asthma combined with emphysema.
Am. J. Respir. Cell Mol. Biol.
PUBLISHED: 04-25-2014
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The incidence of overlapping bronchial asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease has increased in recent years. Cysteinyl leukotrienes (CysLTs) play an important role in asthma, and the type 1 CysLT receptor (CysLT1R) is expressed by many inflammatory cells. We evaluated the effect of montelukast, a CysLT1R antagonist, on mouse models of asthma, porcine pancreatic elastase (PPE)-induced emphysema, and asthma combined with emphysema. Mice were sensitized with ovalbumin (OVA) on Days 0 and 14 and subsequently challenged with OVA on Days 28, 29, and 30. Pulmonary emphysema was induced by intratracheal instillation of PPE on Day 25. Mice were treated subcutaneously with montelukast or vehicle from Day 25 to Day 31. Airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), static compliance; the number of inflammatory cells, the levels of cytokines, chemokines, LTs, and perforin in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, and the quantitative morphometry of lung sections were analyzed on Day 32. Treatment with montelukast significantly attenuated the AHR and eosinophilic airway inflammation in OVA-sensitized and OVA-challenged mice. Administration of montelukast significantly reduced the AHR, static compliance, and neutrophilic airway inflammation, while attenuating emphysematous lung changes, in PPE-treated mice. In PPE-treated mice subjected to allergen sensitization and challenges, montelukast significantly suppressed the AHR, static compliance, and eosinophilic and neutrophilic airway inflammation in addition to the development of experimentally induced emphysema in the lungs. Our data suggest that CysLT1R antagonists may be effective in ameliorating the consequences of PPE-induced lung damage and the changes that follow allergen sensitization and challenges.
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Inhibition of neutrophil elastase attenuates airway hyperresponsiveness and inflammation in a mouse model of secondary allergen challenge: neutrophil elastase inhibition attenuates allergic airway responses.
Respir. Res.
PUBLISHED: 01-17-2013
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Chronic asthma is often associated with neutrophilic infiltration in the airways. Neutrophils contain elastase, a potent secretagogue in the airways, nonetheless the role for neutrophil elastase as well as neutrophilic inflammation in allergen-induced airway responses is not well defined. In this study, we have investigated the impact of neutrophil elastase inhibition on the development of allergic airway inflammation and airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) in previously sensitized and challenged mice.
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IL-17A is essential to the development of elastase-induced pulmonary inflammation and emphysema in mice.
Respir. Res.
PUBLISHED: 01-15-2013
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Pulmonary emphysema is characterized by alveolar destruction and persistent inflammation of the airways. Although IL-17A contributes to many chronic inflammatory diseases, its role in the inflammatory response of elastase-induced emphysema remains unclear.
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A definite case of (L)-carbocisteine-induced pneumonia with CATCH22 syndrome.
Intern. Med.
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2013
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A 32-year-old male with CATCH22 syndrome presented with a high fever and productive cough after taking drugs for acute bronchitis, including (L)-carbocisteine. Chest radiography revealed ground-glass opacities in the bilateral lung fields. He had a history of similar pneumonia. Under the assumption of drug-induced pneumonia, or bacterial or viral pneumonia, all drugs including (L)-carbocisteine were discontinued, and antibiotics were started. A drug-induced lymphocyte stimulation test was positive only for (L)-carbocisteine. The only drug in common between this and the previous episode of pneumonia was (L)-carbocisteine. We thus concluded that this was a definite case of (L)-carbocisteine-induced pneumonia in a patient with CATCH22 syndrome.
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Successful extracorporeal life support for life-threatening hypercapnia with bronchiolitis obliterans after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.
Acta Med. Okayama
PUBLISHED: 12-23-2011
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Bronchiolitis obliterans (BO) is a disease with a poor prognosis, and a key factor that limits long-term survival after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). We here report a case of a 31-year woman with acute lymphatic leukemia, which was treated by chemotherapy and HSCT, and consequently developed BO 2 years after HSCT. A non-tuberculous mycobacterial infection occurred and showed gradual exacerbation. She started taking anti-mycobacterial drugs, but lost appetite, felt tired and finally lost consciousness one month after beginning medication. Arterial blood gas revealed marked hypercapnia. Using extracorporeal life support (ECLS), the carbon dioxide concentration was reduced and her consciousness recovered. To our knowledge, this is the first case in which ECLS was successfully used for hypercapnia in a patient with BO.
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Requirement for chemokine receptor 5 in the development of allergen-induced airway hyperresponsiveness and inflammation.
Am. J. Respir. Cell Mol. Biol.
PUBLISHED: 07-14-2011
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Chemokine receptor (CCR) 5 is expressed on dendritic cells, macrophages, CD8 cells, memory CD4 T cells, and stromal cells, and is frequently used as a marker of T helper type 1 cells. Interventions that abrogate CCR5 or interfere with its ligand binding have been shown to alter T helper type 2-induced inflammatory responses. The role of CCR5 on allergic airway responses is not defined. CCR5-deficient (CCR5(-/-)) and wild-type (CCR5(+/+)) mice were sensitized and challenged with ovalbumin (OVA) and allergic airway responses were monitored 48 hours after the last OVA challenge. Cytokine levels in lung cell culture supernatants were also assessed. CCR5(-/-) mice showed significantly lower airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) and lower numbers of total cells, eosinophils, and lymphocytes in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid compared with CCR5(+/+) mice after sensitization and challenge. The levels of IL-4 and IL-13 in BAL fluid of CCR5(-/-) mice were lower than in CCR5(+/+) mice. Decreased numbers of lung T cells were also detected in CCR5(-/-) mice after sensitization and challenge. Transfer of OVA-sensitized T cells from CCR5(+/+), but not transfer of CCR5(-/-) cells, into CCR5(-/-) mice restored AHR and numbers of eosinophils in BAL fluid after OVA challenge. Accordingly, the numbers of airway-infiltrating donor T cells were significantly higher in the recipients of CCR5(+/+) T cells. Taken together, these data suggest that CCR5 plays a pivotal role in allergen-induced AHR and airway inflammation, and that CCR5 expression on T cells is essential to the accumulation of these cells in the airways.
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[The relationships between the peak inspiratory flow and the characteristics factors in the asthmatics with inhaled corticosteroid -a multicenter study in Chugoku Shikoku area].
Arerugi
PUBLISHED: 07-05-2011
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Inhaled corticosteroid (ICS) will be effective if used properly. Inadequate intake may result in insufficiency, such as for elderly asthmatics, in particular, for use of dry powder inhalers.
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Churg-Strauss syndrome with necrosis of toe tips.
Acta Med. Okayama
PUBLISHED: 06-29-2011
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Churg-Strauss syndrome (CSS) is a granulomatous necrotizing vasculitis of unknown etiology associated with bronchial asthma. Despite affecting small to medium-sized vessels, necrosis of the digits due to vasculitis is extremely rare. We report a case of CSS with necrosis of the toe tips. A 37-year-old woman with asthma, who had been diagnosed with CSS 2 years ago, was admitted to our hospital with an exacerbation of CSS. The patient had a high grade fever and complained of abdominal pain and numbness of the lower extremities. Blood examination revealed marked eosinophilia. The fever pattern, abdominal pain and blood eosinophilia showed improvement by combination treatment with prednisolone and cyclophosphamide. However, the color of her right toe tips changed, and necrosis finally resulted despite antithrombotic therapy. Arteriography showed narrowing of the dorsalis pedis artery and of the more peripheral arteries of her right leg. Stump plasty with negative pressure dressing therapy for the toe tips, but not amputation, was done to preserve the leg function. While numbness of the extremities remained, no recurrence of necrosis was seen. Clinicians need to be aware that rare complications of CSS, including necrosis of the digits, can occur.
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Blocking the leukotriene B4 receptor 1 inhibits late-phase airway responses in established disease.
Am. J. Respir. Cell Mol. Biol.
PUBLISHED: 03-18-2011
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Most of the studies investigating the effectiveness of blocking the leukotriene B4 (LTB4) receptor 1 (BLT1) have been performed in models of primary or acute allergen challenge. The role of the LTB4-BLT1 pathway in secondary challenge models, where airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) and airway inflammation have been established, has not been defined. We investigated the effects of blocking BLT1 on early- and late-phase development of AHR and airway inflammation in previously sensitized and challenged mice. Female BALB/c mice were sensitized (Days 1 and 14) and challenged (primary, Days 28-30) with ovalbumin. On Day 72, mice were challenged (secondary) with a single OVA aerosol, and the early and late phases of AHR and inflammation were determined. Specific blockade of BLT1 was attained by oral administration of a BLT1 antagonist on Days 70 through 72. Administration of the antagonist inhibited the secondary ovalbumin challenge-induced alterations in airway responses during the late phase but not during the early phase, as demonstrated by decreases in AHR and in bronchoalveolar lavage neutrophilia and eosinophilia 6 and 48 hours after secondary challenge. The latter was associated with decreased levels of KC protein, macrophage inflammatory protein 2, and IL-17 in the airways. These data identify the importance of the LTB4-BLT1 pathway in the development of late-phase, allergen-induced airway responsiveness after secondary airway challenge in mice with established airway disease.
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Plasticity of invariant NKT cell regulation of allergic airway disease is dependent on IFN-gamma production.
J. Immunol.
PUBLISHED: 06-04-2010
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Invariant NKT cells (iNKT cells) play a pivotal role in the development of allergen-induced airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) and inflammation. However, it is unclear what role they play in the initiation (sensitization) phase as opposed to the effector (challenge) phase. The role of iNKT cells during sensitization was examined by determining the response of mice to intratracheal transfer of OVA-pulsed or OVA-alpha-galactosylceramide (OVA/alphaGalCer)-pulsed bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs) prior to allergen challenge. Wild-type (WT) recipients of OVA-BMDCs developed AHR, increased airway eosinophilia, and increased levels of Th2 cytokines in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, whereas recipients of OVA/alphaGalCer BMDCs failed to do so. In contrast, transfer of these same OVA/alphaGalCer BMDCs into IFN-gamma-deficient (IFN-gamma(-/-)) mice enhanced the development of these lung allergic responses, which was reversed by exogenous IFN-gamma treatment following OVA-BMDC transfer. Further, Jalpha18-deficient recipients, which lack iNKT cells, developed the full spectrum of lung allergic responses following reconstitution with highly purified WT liver or spleen iNKT cells and transfer of OVA-BMDCs, whereas reconstituted recipients of OVA/alphaGalCer BMDCs failed to do so. Transfer of iNKT cells from IFN-gamma(-/-) mice restored the development of these responses in Jalpha18-deficient recipients following OVA-BMDC transfer; the responses were enhanced following OVA/alphaGalCer BMDC transfer. iNKT cells from these IFN-gamma(-/-) mice produced higher levels of IL-13 in vitro compared with WT iNKT cells. These data identify IFN-gamma as playing a critical role in dictating the consequences of iNKT cell activation in the initiation phase of the development of AHR and airway inflammation.
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Experimental pulmonary granuloma mimicking sarcoidosis induced by Propionibacterium acnes in mice.
Acta Med. Okayama
PUBLISHED: 04-29-2010
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Propionibacterium acnes has been implicated as an etiologic agent of sarcoidosis since the isolation of this bacterium from sarcoid lesions. We experimentally produced a murine pulmonary granuloma model using P. acnes with several features that simulate sarcoidosis. Mice were sensitized with heat-killed P. acnes and complete Freunds adjuvant and were subsequently challenged with heat-killed P. acnes at 2-week intervals. P. acnes-challenged mice developed epitheloid cell granulomas in the lungs. These mice showed a pulmonary immune response characterized by an increased number of T-lymphocytes, especially CD4+ cells, and the ratio of CD4+/CD8+ in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid also increased. Furthermore, significant elevations in both angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) serum levels and antibody titers against P. acnes were observed. Mice sensitized with P. acnes without complete Freunds adjuvant were capable of forming pulmonary granulomas, which appeared to be caused by indigenous P. acnes. The genome of P. acnes was found in the lungs, BAL cells, hilar lymph nodes, liver, and spleen in non-sensitized mice, which were thought to be germ-free. These results suggest that the immune response against indigenous P. acnes may play an important role in the pathogenesis of granuloma formation in a murine model.
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Vaccine-induced CD8+ T cell-dependent suppression of airway hyperresponsiveness and inflammation.
J. Immunol.
PUBLISHED: 06-23-2009
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Suppressing the abnormalities associated with asthma has been difficult to accomplish using immunotherapy or vaccination once the disease is established. The effector cells necessary for effective immunization/vaccination and immunotherapy of asthma are also not well understood. Therefore, we vaccinated allergen (OVA)-sensitized mice to determine whether therapeutic immunization could suppress airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) and inflammation and to identify key immune effector cells and cytokines. Mice were immunized with a vaccine comprised of Ag and cationic liposome-DNA complexes (CLDC), a vaccine which has previously been shown to elicit strong CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell responses and activation of Th1 immunity. We showed that immunization with the OVA-CLDC vaccine significantly suppressed AHR, eosinophilia, goblet cell metaplasia, and Th2 cytokine production. In contrast, immunization with CLDC alone suppressed eosinophilia and Th2 cytokine production, but failed to suppress AHR and goblet cell changes. Using adoptive transfer experiments, we found that suppression of AHR was mediated by Ag-specific CD8(+) T cells and was dependent on IFN-gamma production by the transferred T cells. Thus, we conclude that generation of strong, allergen-specific CD8(+) T cell responses by immunization may be capable of suppressing AHR and allergic airway inflammation, even in previously sensitized and challenged mice.
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Leukotriene B4 release from mast cells in IgE-mediated airway hyperresponsiveness and inflammation.
Am. J. Respir. Cell Mol. Biol.
PUBLISHED: 06-20-2009
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Previous studies have shown that leukotriene B4 (LTB4), a proinflammatory lipid mediator, is linked to the development of airway hyperresponsiveness through the accumulation of IL-13-producing CD8+ T cells, which express a high affinity receptor for LTB4, BLT1 (Miyahara et al., Am J Respir Crit Care Med 2005;172:161-167; J Immunol 2005;174:4979-4984). By using leukotriene A4 hydrolase-deficient (LTA4H-/-) mice, which fail to synthesize LTB4, we determined the role of this lipid mediator in allergen-induced airway responses. Two approaches were used. In the first, LTA4H-/- mice and wild-type (LTA4H+/+) mice were systemically sensitized and challenged via the airways to ovalbumin. In the second, mice were passively sensitized with anti-ovalbumin IgE and exposed to ovalbumin via the airways. Mast cells were generated from bone marrow of LTA4H+/+ mice or LTA4H-/- mice. After active sensitization and challenge, LTA4H-/- mice showed significantly lower airway hyperresponsiveness compared with LTA4H+/+ mice, and eosinophil numbers and IL-13 levels in the bronchoalveoloar lavage of LTA4H-/- mice were also significantly lower. LTA4H-/- mice also showed decreased airway reactivity after passive sensitization and challenge. After LTA4H+/+ mast cell transfer, LTA4H-/- mice showed increased airway reactivity after passive sensitization and challenge, but not after systemic sensitization and challenge. These data confirm the important role for LTB4 in the development of altered airway responses and suggest that LTB4 secretion from mast cells is critical to eliciting increased airway reactivity after passive sensitization with allergen-specific IgE.
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Allergic airway hyperresponsiveness-enhancing gammadelta T cells develop in normal untreated mice and fail to produce IL-4/13, unlike Th2 and NKT cells.
J. Immunol.
PUBLISHED: 02-10-2009
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Allergic airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) in OVA-sensitized and challenged mice, mediated by allergen-specific Th2 cells and Th2-like invariant NKT (iNKT) cells, develops under the influence of enhancing and inhibitory gammadelta T cells. The AHR-enhancing cells belong to the Vgamma1(+) gammadelta T cell subset, cells that are capable of increasing IL-5 and IL-13 levels in the airways in a manner like Th2 cells. They also synergize with iNKT cells in mediating AHR. However, unlike Th2 cells, the AHR enhancers arise in untreated mice, and we show here that they exhibit their functional bias already as thymocytes, at an HSA(high) maturational stage. In further contrast to Th2 cells and also unlike iNKT cells, they could not be stimulated to produce IL-4 and IL-13, consistent with their synergistic dependence on iNKT cells in mediating AHR. Mice deficient in IFN-gamma, TNFRp75, or IL-4 did not produce these AHR-enhancing gammadelta T cells, but in the absence of IFN-gamma, spontaneous development of these cells was restored by adoptive transfer of IFN-gamma-competent dendritic cells from untreated donors. The i.p. injection of OVA/aluminum hydroxide restored development of the AHR enhancers in all of the mutant strains, indicating that the enhancers still can be induced when they fail to develop spontaneously, and that they themselves need not express TNFRp75, IFN-gamma, or IL-4 to exert their function. We conclude that both the development and the cytokine potential of the AHR-enhancing gammadelta T cells differs critically from that of Th2 cells and NKT cells, despite similar influences of these cell populations on AHR.
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Differential effects of dendritic cell transfer on airway hyperresponsiveness and inflammation.
Am. J. Respir. Cell Mol. Biol.
PUBLISHED: 01-16-2009
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Dendritic cells (DCs) are considered to be the most efficient antigen-presenting cells. Intratracheal administration of allergen-pulsed bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs) before allergen challenge induces airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) and inflammation. Ovalbumin (OVA)-pulsed BMDCs from wild-type (WT) mice were transferred into naive WT, CD4(-/-), CD8(-/-), or IL-13(-/-) mice. Two days (short protocol) or 10 days (long protocol) after BMDC transfer, mice were challenged with 1% OVA for 3 days and assayed 2 days later. Transfer of OVA-primed BMDCs into BALB/c or C57BL/6 mice elicited AHR in both protocols. Airway eosinophilia, Th2 cytokines, or goblet cell metaplasia were increased in the long but not short protocol. Lung T cells from both protocols produced Th2 cytokines in response to OVA in vitro. Carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidylester-labeled BMDCs were observed in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid and lung parenchyma at early time points, and were detected in draining lymph nodes 48 hours after transfer. CD8(-/-) mice developed AHR comparable to WT mice in the short protocol, but decreased levels of AHR, airway eosinophilia, Th2 cytokines in BAL fluid, and goblet cell metaplasia compared with WT mice in the long protocol. CD4(-/-) or IL-13(-/-) mice did not develop AHR or airway inflammation in either protocol. These data suggest that allergen-pulsed BMDCs initiate development of AHR that is dependent initially on CD4(+) T cells, and at later time periods on CD8+ T cells and IL-13. Thus, the timing of allergen challenge after transfer of allergen-pulsed BMDC affects the development of AHR and airway inflammation.
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Mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2-dependent pathways are essential for CD8+ T cell-mediated airway hyperresponsiveness and inflammation.
J. Allergy Clin. Immunol.
PUBLISHED: 01-10-2009
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Ligation of the leukotriene B(4) (LTB(4)) receptor 1 on effector memory CD8(+) T cells by LTB(4) is important for the recruitment of CD8(+) T cells into the airways, which appears central to the induction of airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) and allergic inflammation. Phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) is important in activation and cytokine production from many cell types.
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JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

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In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.