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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Do sugar-sweetened beverages cause adverse health outcomes in children? A systematic review protocol.
Syst Rev
PUBLISHED: 09-04-2014
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Cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes are examples of chronic diseases that impose significant morbidity and mortality in the general population worldwide. Most chronic diseases are associated with underlying preventable risk factors, such as elevated blood pressure, high blood glucose or glucose intolerance, high lipid levels, physical inactivity, excessive sedentary behaviours, and overweight/obesity. The occurrence of intermediate outcomes during childhood increases the risk of disease in adulthood. Sugar-sweetened beverages are known to be significant sources of additional caloric intake, and given recent attention to their contribution in the development of chronic diseases, a systematic review is warranted. We will assess whether the consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages in children is associated with adverse health outcomes and what the potential moderating factors are.
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Do sugar-sweetened beverages cause adverse health outcomes in adults? A systematic review protocol.
Syst Rev
PUBLISHED: 07-15-2014
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Chronic diseases, such as cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes, impose significant burden to public health. Most chronic diseases are associated with underlying preventable risk factors, such as elevated blood pressure, blood glucose, and lipids, physical inactivity, excessive sedentary behaviours, overweight and obesity, and tobacco usage. Sugar-sweetened beverages are known to be significant sources of additional caloric intake, and given recent attention to their contribution in the development of chronic diseases, a systematic review is warranted. We will assess whether the consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages in adults is associated with adverse health outcomes and what the potential moderating factors are.
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Dietary sodium intakes and food sources of sodium in Canadian-born and Asian-born individuals of Chinese ethnicity at a Canadian university campus.
J Am Coll Health
PUBLISHED: 02-22-2014
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To document the sodium intake and food sources of sodium of Canadian-born Chinese (CBC) and Asian-born Chinese (ABC) individuals at a Canadian university campus.
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Dietary patterns of female university students with nutrition education.
Can J Diet Pract Res
PUBLISHED: 09-11-2013
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Dietary patterns were examined in a convenience sample of 36 female University of Alberta students, all of whom had completed at least one nutrition course. Data from a validated food frequency questionnaire were used to determine if students had a dietary pattern similar to that recommended in Eating Well with Canadas Food Guide (EWCFG) or by the Traditional Healthy Mediterranean Diet Pyramid (THMDP), as measured using a Mediterranean Diet Quality Index Score. No student consumed the THMDP minimum number of portions of legumes, seeds, and nuts, of olive oil, or of whole grains. The majority did not meet the minimum EWCFG recommendations for any food group. The results suggest that nutrition education alone may be insufficient to ensure optimal dietary patterns among female university students. The methodology reported in this study is novel in assessing whether dietary patterns resemble the THMDP or the EWCFG.
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Influence of gender roles and rising food prices on poor, pregnant womens eating and food provisioning practices in Dhaka, Bangladesh.
Reprod Health
PUBLISHED: 07-08-2013
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Maternal malnutrition in Bangladesh is a persistent health issue and is the product of a number of complex factors, including adherence to food taboos and a patriarchal gender order that limits womens mobility and decision-making. The recent global food price crisis is also negatively impacting poor pregnant womens access to food. It is believed that those who are most acutely affected by rising food prices are the urban poor. While there is an abundance of useful quantitative research centered on maternal nutrition and food insecurity measurements in Bangladesh, missing is an understanding of how food insecurity is experienced by people who are most vulnerable, the urban ultra-poor. In particular, little is known of the lived experience of food insecurity among pregnant women in this context. This research investigated these lived experiences by exploring food provisioning strategies of urban, ultra-poor, pregnant women. This knowledge is important as discussions surrounding the creation of new development goals are currently underway.
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High adiposity is associated cross-sectionally with low self-concept and body size dissatisfaction among indigenous Cree schoolchildren in Canada.
BMC Pediatr
PUBLISHED: 05-21-2013
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Obesity and mental health problems are prevalent among indigenous children in Canada and the United States. In this cross-sectional study the associations between adiposity and body size satisfaction, body image and self-concept were examined in indigenous children in grades four to six living in Cree communities in the Province of Quebec (Canada).
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Predictors of exclusive breastfeeding: observations from the Alberta pregnancy outcomes and nutrition (APrON) study.
BMC Pediatr
PUBLISHED: 05-09-2013
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BACKGROUND: Despite growing evidence that supports the importance of 6-month exclusive breastfeeding, few Canadian mothers adhere to this, and early weaning onto solids is a common practice. This study assessed infant feeding transitions during the first 6 months postpartum and factors that predicted exclusive breastfeeding to 3 and 6 months. METHODS: This prospective cohort study was part of the Alberta Pregnancy Outcomes and Nutrition study (APrON). From an initial sample of 600 pregnant women recruited from Edmonton and Calgary, 402 mothers provided complete details at 3 months postpartum; 300 stayed on to provide information at 6 months postpartum. During pregnancy and at 3 and 6 months postpartum, data on maternal and infant socio-demographic, behavior, and feeding were collected. RESULTS: Even though there was a high rate of "ever having breastfed" (98.6%), exclusive breastfeeding rates for 3 and 6 months were 54.0% and 15.3%, respectively. After controlling for potential confounders, the study showed that mothers who held post-graduate university degrees were 3.76 times more likely to breastfeed exclusively for 6 months than those without a university degree (95%CI: 1.30-10.92; p = 0.015). In addition, mother of previous children were more likely to breastfeed exclusively for 6 months (OR: 2.21, 95%CI: 1.08-4.52; p = 0.031). Mothers who were in the highest quartile of the Iowa Infant Feeding Attitude Score were 4.29 and 5.40 times more likely to breastfeed exclusively for 3 months (95%CI: 1.31-14.08; p-trend < 0.001) and 6 months (95%CI: 2.75-10.60; P-trend < 0.001), respectively. CONCLUSIONS: The 6-month exclusive breastfeeding rate in Alberta is considerably below national and international breastfeeding recommendations. Professional advice that focuses on prenatal maternal knowledge, attitudes, and misperceptions may promote adherence to World Health Organization breastfeeding guidelines. Knowing that exclusive breastfeeding is less likely to take place among lower-educated, primiparous women may help health practitioners focus their support and education for this group.
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Feasibility study of asset mapping with children: identifying how the community environment shapes activity and food choices in Alexander First Nation.
Rural Remote Health
PUBLISHED: 03-27-2013
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It is estimated that First Nations children living on reserves are 4.5 times more likely to be obese than Canadian children in general. Many First Nations children living on reserves have limited healthy food and physical activity options. Understanding how community factors contribute to First Nations childrens lifestyle choices is an understudied area of research. Furthermore, rarely has health research elicited First Nations childrens perspectives of their communities. The purpose of this study was to understand the external behavior-shaping factors that influence the lifestyle behaviors of First Nations children. Asset mapping with children was used to understand how community resources impacted childrens activity and eating options.
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Diet quality and feelings of worry, sadness or unhappiness in Canadian children.
Can J Public Health
PUBLISHED: 01-24-2013
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To examine the association between diet quality and feelings of worry, sadness or unhappiness in Canadian children.
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Alberta Nutrition Guidelines for Children and Youth: awareness and use in schools.
Can J Diet Pract Res
PUBLISHED: 09-08-2011
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In June 2008, the Alberta government released the Alberta Nutrition Guidelines for Children and Youth. We evaluated the awareness of and intent to use the guidelines in Alberta schools, and sought to determine whether organizational characteristics were a factor in adoption of the guidelines.
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Associations between household food insecurity and health outcomes in the Aboriginal population (excluding reserves).
Health Rep
PUBLISHED: 08-19-2011
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Aboriginal people are more vulnerable to food insecurity and morbidity than is the Canadian population overall. However, little information is available about the association between food insecurity and health in Aboriginal households.
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From paper to practice: barriers to adopting nutrition guidelines in schools.
J Nutr Educ Behav
PUBLISHED: 04-09-2011
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To explore the barriers associated with the adoption of the Alberta Nutrition Guidelines for Children and Youth in schools according to characteristics of the innovation (guidelines) and the organization (schools).
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Assessment of Canadian Cree infants birth size using the WHO Child Growth Standards.
Am. J. Hum. Biol.
PUBLISHED: 03-11-2011
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The WHO Child Growth Standards (CGS) which were recently adopted by the Canadian Pediatric Society were used to assess the relative size of Cree newborns.
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Dietary inadequacy is associated with anemia and suboptimal growth among preschool-aged children in Yunnan Province, China.
Nutr Res
PUBLISHED: 01-06-2011
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This study documented the relationships among dietary intake, growth failure, and anemia in a convenience sample of 172 children aged 1 to 5 years in rural Yunnan Province, China. We hypothesized that most children would have suboptimal intakes of key nutrients associated with child growth and anemia and that undernutrition would be more common in children with poor growth and in those who were anemic. Nutrient intakes from three 24-hour recalls were compared with the Dietary Reference Intakes. Height/length and weight were compared with World Health Organization Child Growth Standards to determine if children were malnourished (z score < -2 SD median). Blood was tested for anemia (hemoglobin <110 g/L). Stunting, underweight, wasting, and anemia were present among 44.4%, 15.7%, 1.7%, and 35.4% of children, respectively. The percentage of children not meeting the estimated average requirement for zinc, vitamin A, iron, and protein or the adequate intake for calcium was 87.2%, 80.8%, 66.3%, 7.6%, and 100.0%, respectively. Altogether, 19.2% and 78.5% of children were below the acceptable macronutrient distribution range for percentage of energy from protein and fat, respectively. More stunted than not stunted children were below the estimated average requirement for vitamin A, as were more anemic than nonanemic children. Growth faltering combined with findings of anemia and suboptimal intake of a variety of nutrients suggests a high prevalence of chronic dietary inadequacy among preschool-aged children in Yunnan Province. Consuming more protein-, fat-, zinc-, iron-, and vitamin A-rich foods may improve growth and reduce anemia.
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Use of vitamin and mineral supplements among Canadian adults.
Can J Public Health
PUBLISHED: 12-10-2009
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To estimate the prevalence and determinants of use of vitamin and mineral supplements among adult Canadians.
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Diabetes awareness and body size perceptions of Cree schoolchildren.
Health Educ Res
PUBLISHED: 11-06-2009
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Native American Indians and First Nations are predisposed to obesity and diabetes. A study was done to understand Cree schoolchildrens diabetes awareness and body size perceptions in two communities that had diabetes awareness-raising activities in the Province of Quebec, Canada. Children (N = 203) in grades 4-6 were classified into weight categories using measured heights and weights and grouped on diabetes awareness based on dichotomous responses to the question Do you know what diabetes is? Children selected a drawing of an American Indian child whom they felt most likely to get diabetes and described their body size perception using a closed response question. Although 64.5% of children were overweight or obese, most (60.1%) children considered their body size to be just right, with 29.6% considering it too big and 10.3% considering it too small. A minority (27.6%) of children had diabetes awareness. These children were more likely than children without diabetes awareness to consider their body size too big (42.9 versus 24.5%) and to choose an obese drawing as at risk for diabetes (85.7 versus 63.3%, odds ratio 3.48 and 95% confidence interval 1.53-7.91). Culturally appropriate health education programs to increase schoolchildrens diabetes awareness and possibility to have a healthy body weight are important.
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Prevalence and sociodemographic risk factors related to household food security in Aboriginal peoples in Canada.
Public Health Nutr
PUBLISHED: 10-07-2009
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Canadas Aboriginal population is vulnerable to food insecurity and increasingly lives off-reserve. The Canadian Community Health Survey, Cycle 2.2 Nutrition, was used to compare the prevalence and sociodemographic correlates of food insecurity between non-Aboriginal and off-reserve Aboriginal households.
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Associations among the food environment, diet quality and weight status in Cree children in Québec.
Public Health Nutr
PUBLISHED: 01-15-2009
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To explore the relationship among childrens diet quality, weight status and food environment in subarctic Canada.
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Using first nations childrens perceptions of food and activity to inform an obesity prevention strategy.
Qual Health Res
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Obesity and associated health risks disproportionately affect Aboriginal (First Nations) children in Canada. The purpose of this research study was to elicit First Nations childrens perceptions of food, activity, and health to inform a community-based obesity prevention strategy. Fifteen 4th- and 5th-Grade students participated in one of three focus group interviews that utilized drawing and pile-sorting activities. We used an ecological lens to structure our findings. Analyses revealed that a variety of interdependent sociocultural factors influenced childrens perceptions. Embedded within a cultural/traditional worldview, children indicated a preference for foods and activities from both contemporary Western and traditional cultures, highlighted family members as their main sources of health information, and described information gaps in their health education. Informed by childrens perspectives, these findings offer guidance for developing an obesity prevention strategy for First Nations children in this community.
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Dairy foods are an important source of calcium and vitamin D among Canadian-born and Asian-born Chinese in Edmonton, Alberta.
Nutr Res
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Low intakes of calcium and vitamin D increase the risk for osteoporosis, bone fracture, and other health problems. This study aimed to examine the calcium and vitamin D intakes of Canadian-born Chinese (CBC) and Asian-born Chinese (ABC) in Edmonton, Canada, and to identify usual food sources of these nutrients. We hypothesized that CBC would have higher intakes of calcium and vitamin D than ABC and that the food sources of these nutrients would differ by region of birth (Canada vs Asia). Two in-person multipass 24-hour dietary recalls were administered for 1 weekday and weekend day for 81 healthy ethnically Chinese aged 18 to 58 years. The risks for calcium and vitamin D inadequacy were calculated as were the contributions of specific foods to calcium and vitamin D intakes. Calcium intake was 781 ± 337 mg/d for CBC and 809 ± 369 mg/d for ABC (P = .737). Vitamin D intake was 3.8 ± 3.4 ?g/d for CBC and 5.0 ± 3.9 ?g/d for ABC (P = .158). Respective risks for calcium and vitamin D inadequacy were 36% and 98% for men and 78% and 100% for women. Dairy contributed most to the calcium (43%) and vitamin D (52%) intake of participants. For ABC, soybean products contributed to 8.1% of calcium, whereas fatty fish contributed to 16.7% of vitamin D. For CBC, red meats contributed to 11.1% of vitamin D. Dietary intakes of calcium and vitamin D need to be increased in Chinese Canadians through the promotion of dairy and culturally relevant sources of these nutrients.
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Prevalence of anemia among Quebec Cree infants from 2002 to 2007 compared with 1995 to 2000.
Can Fam Physician
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To determine if screening of infants for anemia at 9 months in the Cree region of Quebec should continue,by comparing the prevalence of anemia in the initial years of screening (1995 to 2000) with prevalence data from infants screened between 2002 and 2007.
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A socioecological framework to understand weight-related issues in Aboriginal children in Canada.
Appl Physiol Nutr Metab
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Obesity prevention efforts in Aboriginal (First Nations, Métis, or Inuit) communities in Canada should focus predominantly on children given their demographic significance and the accelerated time course of occurrence of type 2 diabetes mellitus in the Aboriginal population. A socioecological model to address childhood obesity in Aboriginal populations would focus on the numerous environments at different times in childhood that influence weight status, including prenatal, sociocultural, family, and community environments. Importantly, for Aboriginal children, obesity interventions need to also be situated within the context of a history of colonization and inequities in the social determinants of health. This review therefore advocates for the inclusion of a historical perspective and a life-course approach to obesity prevention in Aboriginal children in addition to developing interventions around the socioecological framework. We emphasize that childhood obesity prevention efforts should focus on promoting maternal health behaviours before and during pregnancy, and on breastfeeding and good infant and child nutrition in the postpartum and early childhood development periods. Ameliorating food insecurity by focusing on improving the sociodemographic risk factors for it, such as increasing income and educational attainment, are essential. More research is required to understand and measure obesogenic Aboriginal environments, to examine how altering specific environments modifies the foods that children eat and the activities that they do, and to examine how restoring and rebuilding cultural continuity in Aboriginal communities modifies the many determinants of obesity. This research needs to be done with the full participation of Aboriginal communities as partners in the research.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.