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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Establishment of a panel of in-house polyclonal antibodies for the diagnosis of enterovirus infections.
Neuropathology
PUBLISHED: 08-24-2014
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The aim of this study was to establish a reliable method of virus detection for the diagnosis of critical enterovirus infections such as acute infective encephalitis, encephalomyelitis and myocarditis. Because histopathological and immunohistochemical analyses of paraffin-embedded tissues play an important role in recognizing infectious agents in tissue samples, six in-house polyclonal antibodies raised against three representative enteroviruses using an indirect immunofluorescence assay and immunohistochemistry were examined. This panel of polyclonal antibodies recognized three serotypes of enterovirus. Two of the polyclonal antibodies were raised against denatured virus particles from enterovirus A71, one was raised against the recombinant VP1 protein of coxsackievirus B3, and the other for poliovirus type 1 were raised against denatured virus particles, the recombinant VP1 protein and peptide 2C. Western blot analysis revealed that each of these antibodies recognized the corresponding viral antigen and none cross-reacted with non-enteroviruses within the family Picornaviridae. However, all cross-reacted to some extent with the antigens derived from other serotypes of enterovirus. Indirect immunofluorescence assay and immunohistochemistry revealed that the virus capsid and non-structural proteins were localized in the cytoplasm of affected culture cells, and skeletal muscles and neurons in neonatal mice experimentally-infected with human enterovirus. The antibodies also recognized antigens derived from recent clinical isolates of enterovirus A71, coxsackievirus B3 and poliovirus. In addition, immunohistochemistry revealed that representative antibodies tested showed the same recognition pattern according to each serotype. Thus, the panel of in-house anti-enterovirus polyclonal antibodies described herein will be an important tool for the screening and pathological diagnosis for enterovirus infections, and may be useful for the classification of different enterovirus serotypes, including coxsackieviruses A and B, echoviruses, enterovirus A71 and poliovirus.
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Assessment of the hamster cheek pouch as a model for radiation-induced oral mucositis, and evaluation of the protective effects of keratinocyte growth factor using this model.
Int. J. Radiat. Biol.
PUBLISHED: 08-11-2014
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Oral mucositis induced by radiotherapy impacts quality of life. Previous studies have reported on the use of the hamster as a model for radiation-induced oral mucositis; however, details regarding factors such as radiation dose response, effects on myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity and related histopathological changes remain unclear. In the present study using the hamster, we evaluated the dose dependency of radiation-induced oral mucositis and the effects of keratinocyte growth factor (palifermin).
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The host protease TMPRSS2 plays a major role in in vivo replication of emerging H7N9 and seasonal influenza viruses.
J. Virol.
PUBLISHED: 03-05-2014
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Proteolytic cleavage of the hemagglutinin (HA) protein is essential for influenza A virus (IAV) to acquire infectivity. This process is mediated by a host cell protease(s) in vivo. The type II transmembrane serine protease TMPRSS2 is expressed in the respiratory tract and is capable of activating a variety of respiratory viruses, including low-pathogenic (LP) IAVs possessing a single arginine residue at the cleavage site. Here we show that TMPRSS2 plays an essential role in the proteolytic activation of LP IAVs, including a recently emerged H7N9 subtype, in vivo. We generated TMPRSS2 knockout (KO) mice. The TMPRSS2 KO mice showed normal reproduction, development, and growth phenotypes. In TMPRSS2 KO mice infected with LP IAVs, cleavage of HA was severely impaired, and consequently, the majority of LP IAV progeny particles failed to gain infectivity, while the viruses were fully activated proteolytically in TMPRSS2+/+ wild-type (WT) mice. Accordingly, in contrast to WT mice, TMPRSS2 KO mice were highly tolerant of challenge infection by LP IAVs (H1N1, H3N2, and H7N9) with ?1,000 50% lethal doses (LD50) for WT mice. On the other hand, a high-pathogenic H5N1 subtype IAV possessing a multibasic cleavage site was successfully activated in the lungs of TMPRSS2 KO mice and killed these mice, as observed for WT mice. Our results demonstrate that recently emerged H7N9 as well as seasonal IAVs mainly use the specific protease TMPRSS2 for HA cleavage in vivo and, thus, that TMPRSS2 expression is essential for IAV replication in vivo.
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Clinical characteristics and genetic analysis of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia with hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis: a Japanese retrospective study by the Kyushu-Yamaguchi Children's Cancer Study Group.
Int. J. Hematol.
PUBLISHED: 02-17-2014
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This present study sought to analyze acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) patients with hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) registered in Kyushu-Yamaguchi Children's Cancer Study Group studies conducted between 1996 and 2007. Four of 357 patients, including two of 318 patients with B cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (BCP-ALL) and two of 39 of those with T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL), were identified. HLH was observed more frequently in the T-ALL patients than in the BCP-ALL patients (P = 0.061). The mean age of 13.0 years at the diagnosis of leukemia in the HLH + ALL group was significantly higher than the 6.05 years observed in the remaining ALL groups (P = 0.001). A female predisposition was noted, as all four patients were female (P = 0.043). In two of four patients, the leukemic cells exhibited deletions on the long arm of chromosome 6 (P = 0.003). Three patients suffered from HLH during maintenance therapy. Parvovirus B19 infection and cytomegalovirus reactivation were identified as causes of HLH in one and two patients, respectively. All four patients are currently in complete remission, although one developed relapse of leukemia after receiving maintenance therapy. Based on the genetic analyses, non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in UNC13D, syntaxin 11, and STXBP2 were identified in all patients. Clinicians should therefore be aware of the risk of HLH during maintenance therapy, especially in older T-ALL patients with SNPs in familial HLH causative genes.
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Circulating avian influenza viruses closely related to the 1918 virus have pandemic potential.
Cell Host Microbe
PUBLISHED: 01-30-2014
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Wild birds harbor a large gene pool of influenza A viruses that have the potential to cause influenza pandemics. Foreseeing and understanding this potential is important for effective surveillance. Our phylogenetic and geographic analyses revealed the global prevalence of avian influenza virus genes whose proteins differ only a few amino acids from the 1918 pandemic influenza virus, suggesting that 1918-like pandemic viruses may emerge in the future. To assess this risk, we generated and characterized a virus composed of avian influenza viral segments with high homology to the 1918 virus. This virus exhibited pathogenicity in mice and ferrets higher than that in an authentic avian influenza virus. Further, acquisition of seven amino acid substitutions in the viral polymerases and the hemagglutinin surface glycoprotein conferred respiratory droplet transmission to the 1918-like avian virus in ferrets, demonstrating that contemporary avian influenza viruses with 1918 virus-like proteins may have pandemic potential.
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The First Identification and Retrospective Study of Severe Fever With Thrombocytopenia Syndrome in Japan.
J. Infect. Dis.
PUBLISHED: 11-14-2013
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Background.?Severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome (SFTS) is caused by SFTS virus (SFTSV), a novel bunyavirus reported to be endemic in central and northeastern China. This article describes the first identified patient with SFTS and a retrospective study on SFTS in Japan.Methods.?Virologic and pathologic examinations were performed on the patients samples. Laboratory diagnosis of SFTS was made by isolation/genome amplification and/or the detection of anti-SFTSV immunoglobulin G antibody in sera. Physicians were alerted to the initial diagnosis and asked whether they had previously treated patients with symptoms similar to those of SFTS.Results.?A female patient who died in 2012 received a diagnosis of SFTS. Ten additional patients with SFTS were then retrospectively identified. All patients were aged ?50 years and lived in western Japan. Six cases were fatal. The ratio of males to females was 8:3. SFTSV was isolated from 8 patients. Phylogenetic analyses indicated that all of the Japanese SFTSV isolates formed a genotype independent to those from China. Most patients showed symptoms due to hemorrhage, possibly because of disseminated intravascular coagulation and/or hemophagocytosis.Conclusions.?SFTS has been endemic to Japan, and SFTSV has been circulating naturally within the country.
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Characterization of H7N9 influenza A viruses isolated from humans.
Nature
PUBLISHED: 05-23-2013
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Avian influenza A viruses rarely infect humans; however, when human infection and subsequent human-to-human transmission occurs, worldwide outbreaks (pandemics) can result. The recent sporadic infections of humans in China with a previously unrecognized avian influenza A virus of the H7N9 subtype (A(H7N9)) have caused concern owing to the appreciable case fatality rate associated with these infections (more than 25%), potential instances of human-to-human transmission, and the lack of pre-existing immunity among humans to viruses of this subtype. Here we characterize two early human A(H7N9) isolates, A/Anhui/1/2013 (H7N9) and A/Shanghai/1/2013 (H7N9); hereafter referred to as Anhui/1 and Shanghai/1, respectively. In mice, Anhui/1 and Shanghai/1 were more pathogenic than a control avian H7N9 virus (A/duck/Gunma/466/2011 (H7N9); Dk/GM466) and a representative pandemic 2009 H1N1 virus (A/California/4/2009 (H1N1pdm09); CA04). Anhui/1, Shanghai/1 and Dk/GM466 replicated well in the nasal turbinates of ferrets. In nonhuman primates, Anhui/1 and Dk/GM466 replicated efficiently in the upper and lower respiratory tracts, whereas the replicative ability of conventional human influenza viruses is typically restricted to the upper respiratory tract of infected primates. By contrast, Anhui/1 did not replicate well in miniature pigs after intranasal inoculation. Critically, Anhui/1 transmitted through respiratory droplets in one of three pairs of ferrets. Glycan arrays showed that Anhui/1, Shanghai/1 and A/Hangzhou/1/2013 (H7N9) (a third human A(H7N9) virus tested in this assay) bind to human virus-type receptors, a property that may be critical for virus transmissibility in ferrets. Anhui/1 was found to be less sensitive in mice to neuraminidase inhibitors than a pandemic H1N1 2009 virus, although both viruses were equally susceptible to an experimental antiviral polymerase inhibitor. The robust replicative ability in mice, ferrets and nonhuman primates and the limited transmissibility in ferrets of Anhui/1 suggest that A(H7N9) viruses have pandemic potential.
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Excessive cytokine response to rapid proliferation of highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses leads to fatal systemic capillary leakage in chickens.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2013
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Highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses (HPAIVs) cause lethal infection in chickens. Severe cases of HPAIV infections have been also reported in mammals, including humans. In both mammals and birds, the relationship between host cytokine response to the infection with HPAIVs and lethal outcome has not been well understood. In the present study, the highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses A/turkey/Italy/4580/1999 (H7N1) (Ty/Italy) and A/chicken/Netherlands/2586/2003 (H7N7) (Ck/NL) and the low pathogenic avian influenza virus (LPAIV) A/chicken/Ibaraki/1/2005 (H5N2) (Ck/Ibaraki) were intranasally inoculated into chickens. Ty/Italy replicated more extensively than Ck/NL in systemic tissues of the chickens, especially in the brain, and induced excessive mRNA expression of inflammatory and antiviral cytokines (IFN-?, IL-1?, IL-6, and IFN-?) in proportion to its proliferation. Using in situ hybridization, IL-6 mRNA was detected mainly in microglial nodules in the brain of the chickens infected with Ty/Italy. Capillary leakage assessed by Evans blue staining was observed in multiple organs, especially in the brains of the chickens infected with Ty/Italy, and was not observed in those infected with Ck/NL. In contrast, LPAIV caused only local infection in the chickens, with neither apparent cytokine expression nor capillary leakage in any tissue of the chickens. The present results indicate that an excessive cytokine response is induced by rapid and extensive proliferation of HPAIV and causes fatal multiple organ failure in chickens.
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Histopathological and immunohistochemical findings of 20 autopsy cases with 2009 H1N1 virus infection.
Mod. Pathol.
PUBLISHED: 08-26-2011
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Twenty autopsy cases with 2009 pandemic influenza A (2009 H1N1) virus infection, performed between August 2009 and February 2010, were histopathologically analyzed. Hematoxylin-eosin staining, immunohistochemistry for type A influenza nucleoprotein antigen, and real-time reverse transcription-PCR assay for viral RNA were performed on formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded specimens. In addition, the D222G amino acid substitution in influenza virus hemagglutinin, which binds to specific cell receptors, was analyzed in formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded trachea and lung sections by direct sequencing of PCR-amplified products. There were several histopathological patterns in the lung according to the most remarkable findings in each case: acute diffuse alveolar damage (DAD) with a hyaline membrane (four cases), organized DAD (one case), acute massive intra-alveolar edema with variable degrees of hemorrhage (three cases), neutrophilic bronchopneumonia (five cases) and tracheobronchitis with limited histopathological changes in alveoli (four cases). In two cases, the main findings were due to preexisting disease. Influenza virus antigen was only detected in the respiratory tract in 10 cases by immunohistochemistry. The antigen was detected in type II pneumocytes (three cases) in the epithelial cells of the trachea, bronchi and glands (six cases), and in the epithelial cells in both of the above (one case). The four cases with acute DAD presented with antigen-positive type II pneumocytes. In one case, the D222G substitution was detected in the lung as a major sequence, although 222D was prominent in the trachea, suggesting that selection of the viral clones occurred in the respiratory tract. In five cases, the pathogenesis of 2009 H1N1 was confirmed to be viral infection in pneumocytes, which caused severe alveolar damage and fatal viral pneumonia. Further studies on both host and viral factors in autopsy or biopsy materials will be essential to elucidate the other pathogenic factors involved in influenza virus infection.
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Leptin acts as a growth factor for colorectal tumours at stages subsequent to tumour initiation in murine colon carcinogenesis.
Gut
PUBLISHED: 03-15-2011
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Obesity increases the risk of colorectal cancer (CRC). Serum leptin levels are markedly elevated in obese individuals, but the involvement of leptin in CRC growth remains unclear. We explored the hypothesis that leptin signalling regulates the growth of CRC, by examining the effects of leptin deficiency on murine colon tumour growth.
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Oligoarginine-linked polymers as a new class of penetration enhancers.
J Control Release
PUBLISHED: 04-03-2010
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Oligoarginines, which are known as cell-penetrating peptides, enhance the cellular uptake of poorly membrane-permeable bioactive molecules that are chemically conjugated to them. We designed a novel polymer: oligoarginine-linked poly(N-vinylacetamide-co-acrylic acid), with the expectation that the polymers will enhance the cellular uptake of the bioactive molecules that are physically mixed with them. Oligoarginines were grafted onto the polymer backbone through the chemical reaction with acrylic acid functional groups. The changes in the blood glucose concentration after nasal administration of insulin with and without the polymer were monitored in mice. The blood glucose concentration was slightly reduced when insulin was given solely at a dose of 10IU/kg. A D-octaarginine-linked poly(N-vinylacetamide-co-acrylic acid) with a grafting degree of 2% significantly enhanced the insulin-induced hypoglycemic effect. A similar enhancement was not observed when the polymer was substituted with intact D-octaarginine. The penetration-enhancing function of D-octaarginine-linked poly(N-vinylacetamide-co-acrylic acid) increased dramatically with an increase in the grafting degree of D-octaarginine. Substitution of D-octaarginine with the corresponding optical isomer and an increase in the number of arginine residues rather reduced the penetration-enhancing function. In vitro cell studies also indicated that a D-octaarginine-linked poly(N-vinylacetamide-co-acrylic acid) with a grafting degree of 17% enabled fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran to effectively penetrate the cell membrane. Results demonstrated that our oligoarginine-linked polymer has a potential to provide a new class of penetration enhancers.
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Characterization of quasispecies of pandemic 2009 influenza A virus (A/H1N1/2009) by de novo sequencing using a next-generation DNA sequencer.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 02-19-2010
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Pandemic 2009 influenza A virus (A/H1N1/2009) has emerged globally. In this study, we performed a comprehensive detection of potential pathogens by de novo sequencing using a next-generation DNA sequencer on total RNAs extracted from an autopsy lung of a patient who died of viral pneumonia with A/H1N1/2009. Among a total of 9.4x10(6) 40-mer short reads, more than 98% appeared to be human, while 0.85% were identified as A/H1N1/2009 (A/Nagano/RC1-L/2009(H1N1)). Suspected bacterial reads such as Streptococcus pneumoniae and other oral bacteria flora were very low at 0.005%, and a significant bacterial infection was not histologically observed. De novo assembly and read mapping analysis of A/Nagano/RC1-L/2009(H1N1) showed more than x200 coverage on average, and revealed nucleotide heterogeneity on hemagglutinin as quasispecies, specifically at two amino acids (Gly(172)Glu and Gly(239)Asn of HA) located on the Sa and Ca2 antigenic sites, respectively. Gly239 and Asn239 on antigenic site Ca2 appeared to be minor amino acids compared with the highly distributed Asp239 in H1N1 HAs. This study demonstrated that de novo sequencing can comprehensively detect pathogens, and such in-depth investigation facilitates the identification of influenza A viral heterogeneity. To better characterize the A/H1N1/2009 virus, unbiased comprehensive techniques will be indispensable for the primary investigations of emerging infectious diseases.
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Effects of lansoprazole on the expression of VEGF and cellular proliferation in a rat model of acetic acid-induced gastric ulcer.
J. Gastroenterol.
PUBLISHED: 02-15-2010
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A recent study reported that in addition to their inhibitory effect on gastric acid secretion, some proton pump inhibitors also exert a cytoprotective effect on the gastric mucosa. We investigated the effects of lansoprazole (LPZ) on the epithelial cell cycle, and on the expressions of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2).
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ImmunoAT method: An initial assessment for the detection of abnormal isoforms of prion protein in formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded tissues.
J. Virol. Methods
PUBLISHED: 02-01-2010
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The AT-tailing method is a labelling technique that utilises oligo(dA-dT)-dependent signal amplification. In this study, a new immunohistochemical application of the immunoAT method was developed. This method uses an oligo(dA-dT)-conjugated primary antibody (direct immunoAT method) or an oligo(dA-dT)-conjugated secondary antibody (indirect immunoAT method). Fifteen-base oligo(dA-dT)-conjugated antibodies (IgG-ATs) were prepared in advance by conjugating maleimide-activated oligo(dA-dT) to IgG via free sulfhydryl residues that had been introduced on the surface of IgG using Trauts reagent. Following the reaction with the target antigen and the IgG-AT, oligo(dA-dT) was elongated by DeltaTth DNA polymerase in the presence of dATP, dTTP and biotinylated dUTP, consequently labelling the antigen-antibody complex with a large amount of biotin. To initially evaluate the immunoAT method, the presence or absence of prion protein (PrP(sc)) was determined in formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded sections of the medulla oblongata of cattle which had been under active surveillance for bovine spongiform encephalopathy. Sections were examined using direct and indirect immunoAT methods and the EnVision+ system (Dako) under conditions that were identical except for the differing IgG-AT and AT-tailing methods. PrP(sc) detection was consistent using all three methods. The clearest signals were obtained using the indirect immunoAT method, suggesting significant potential for this method.
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Sudden death of a patient with pandemic influenza (A/H1N1pdm) virus infection by acute respiratory distress syndrome.
Jpn. J. Infect. Dis.
PUBLISHED: 01-23-2010
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We describe an autopsy case of a patient with pandemic influenza (A/H1N1pdm) virus infection in Japan, who developed rapidly progressive viral pneumonia exhibiting diffuse alveolar damage. A 41-year-old female visited our hospital with a fever of 38.7C. She was a public health nurse with no underlying disease and had had contact with a group of elementary school students who had been infected with the influenza (A/H1N1pdm) virus 1 week earlier. She was prescribed oseltamivir and returned to the hotel where she was staying alone. The next day, she was found dead in her hotel room. At autopsy, both lungs were voluminous and microscopic examination revealed acute-stage, severe diffuse alveolar damage with remarkable mononuclear cell infiltration and hyaline membrane formation in the lungs. CD8-positive T lymphocytes were dominantly observed. Immunohistochemically, influenza A viral protein was confirmed in the damaged type II pneumocytes and also in the infiltrated macrophages. Real-time RT-PCR analysis of both pre- and post-mortem pharyngeal swabs confirmed a novel influenza (A/H1N1pdm) virus infection. This is the second autopsy case of influenza (A/H1N1pdm) virus infection in Japan, and the findings indicated that the patient died due to an exceptionally rapid progression of viral pneumonia. This case indicates that patients with influenza (A/H1N1pdm) virus infection should be carefully monitor for acute respiratory distress syndrome.
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The first autopsy case of pandemic influenza (A/H1N1pdm) virus infection in Japan: detection of a high copy number of the virus in type II alveolar epithelial cells by pathological and virological examination.
Jpn. J. Infect. Dis.
PUBLISHED: 01-23-2010
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We report the pathological and virological findings of the first autopsy case of the 2009 pandemic influenza (A/H1N1pdm) virus infection in Japan. A man aged 33 years with chronic heart failure due to dilated cardiomyopathy, mild diabetes mellitus, atopic dermatitis, bronchial asthma, and obesity died of respiratory failure and multiple organ dysfunction syndrome. Macroscopic examination showed severe pulmonary edema and microscopically the lung sections showed very early exudative-stage diffuse alveolar damage (DAD). Immunohistochemistry revealed proliferation of the influenza (A/H1N1pdm) virus in alveolar epithelial cells, some of which expressed SAalpha2-3Gal on the cell surface. Influenza (A/H1N1pdm) virus genomic RNA and mRNA were also detected in alveolar epithelial cells. Real-time PCR revealed 723 copies/cell in the left lower lung section from which the influenza (A/H1N1pdm) virus was isolated. Electron microscopic analysis revealed filamentous viral particles in the lung tissue. The concentrations of various cytokines/chemokines in the serum and the autopsied lung tissue were measured. IL-2R, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IFN-alpha, MCP-1, and MIG levels were elevated in both. These findings indicated a case of viral pneumonia caused by influenza (A/H1N1pdm) virus infection, showing characteristic pathological findings of the early stage of DAD.
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Nuclear localization of Merkel cell polyomavirus large T antigen in Merkel cell carcinoma.
Virology
PUBLISHED: 01-13-2010
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To clarify whether mutations in the large T gene encoded by Merkel cell polyomavirus affect the expression and function of large T antigen in Merkel cell carcinoma cases, we investigated the expression of large T antigen in vitro and in vivo. Immunohistochemistry using a rabbit polyclonal antibody revealed that large T antigen was expressed in the nuclei of Merkel cell carcinoma cells with Merkel cell polyomavirus infection. Deletion mutant analyses identified an Arg-Lys-Arg-Lys sequence (amino acids 277-280) as a nuclear localization signal in large T antigen. Sequence analyses revealed that there were no mutations in the nuclear localization signal in any of the eleven Merkel cell polyomavirus strains examined. Furthermore, stop codons were not observed in the upstream of the nuclear localization signal in any of the Merkel cell carcinoma cases examined. These data suggest that the nuclear localization signal is highly conserved and functional in Merkel cell carcinoma cases.
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Rabies virus dissemination in neural tissues of autopsy cases due to rabies imported into Japan from the Philippines: immunohistochemistry.
Pathol. Int.
PUBLISHED: 07-25-2009
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Two Japanese men, 65 and 69 years old, developed rabies in Japan around 2-3 months after dog-bite exposure in the Philippines. Laboratory diagnosis of rabies was made following the detection of rabies virus genome on reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction from saliva, and on immunohistochemistry of a nuchal skin punch biopsy in one case. The patients died 9 and 19 days after clinical onset. At autopsy, no macroscopic changes in the CNS were observed. Histopathology indicated that eosinophilic and cytoplasmic inclusion bodies, Negri bodies, were seen in neuronal cells of the CNS. Inflammatory cell reactions were scarce, and no apoptosis in the CNS was detected. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated that rabies virus nucleoprotein (N) and phosphoprotein (P) were disseminated to all neural tissues and cells in the body with a similar pattern in both cases. Interestingly, there were no differences of localization between N and P antigen in the brain, but the N antigen was located at the peripheral nerve sheaths and the P antigen was localized in axons. These data indicate that rabies virus dissemination in all neural tissues causes disease development and death. Immunohistochemistry for rabies is a powerful tool to understand the pathogenesis of rabies.
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Role of myeloid cell leukemia-1 in cell growth of squamous cell carcinoma.
J. Pharmacol. Sci.
PUBLISHED: 07-01-2009
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Myeloid cell leukemia-1 (Mcl-1), a member of the B-cell lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2) family, has been reported to be a critical survival factor in hematopoietic cells, yet little data exists for a role of Mcl-1 in human oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). A high level expression of Mcl-1 was observed in tumor cells of human primary SCC, lymph node metastasis tissues, and SCC cell lines. We manipulated expression of Mcl-1 protein in SCC cells by small interfering RNA (siRNA) for Mcl-1 and observed that Mcl-1 siRNA inhibited the growth of SCCs accompanied with apoptosis. Combination therapy of Mcl-1 siRNA and anti-tumor drug drastically inhibited the cell growth in comparison to that in each single treatment. In addition, phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) was decreased by treatment with Mcl-1 siRNA, resulting in decreases in phosphorylation of MEK1/2 and MAPK. The cell growth inhibition caused by knockdown of Mcl-1 was suggested to be mainly a result of suppression of proliferation via the inhibition of intracellular FAK/MAPK signaling pathways. These results imply a potentially important and novel role of the inhibition of Mcl-1 function by the use of specific siRNA in the treatment of SCC.
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Zinc supplementation improves the outcome of chronic hepatitis C and liver cirrhosis.
J Clin Biochem Nutr
PUBLISHED: 04-28-2009
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We treated patients with C-viral chronic hepatitis (CH) and liver cirrhosis (LC) with polaprezinc and determined prospectively the effect on long-term outcome. 62 patients were enrolled. Of these, 32 were administered 1.0 g polaprezinc and the remainder were not administered polaprezinc. We measured the serum zinc concentrations using conventional atomic absorption spectrometry and conducted a prospective study to determine the long-term outcome of the polaprezinc therapy. Changes of aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels in the polaprezinc administration group were significantly lower than those of the untreated group. The decrease in platelet count was clearly less than that of the untreated group. The factors that inhibited increases in serum zinc concentrations following administration of polaprezinc included low serum zinc concentration states. Furthermore, the reductions of AST and ALT levels in the low zinc group were significantly greater than those of the high zinc group. When the patients who were administered polaprezinc were divided into two groups whose zinc concentrations increased (zinc responders) or remained stable or decreased (zinc non-responders), the zinc responders had a clearly lower cumulative incidence of HCC than the zinc non-responders. We conclude zinc supplementation improved the long-term outcome in C-viral CH and LC patients.
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The Expression of Murine Double Minute 2 (MDM2) on Helicobacter pylori-Infected Intestinal Metaplasia and Gastric Cancer.
J Clin Biochem Nutr
PUBLISHED: 02-28-2009
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The overexpression of murine double minute 2 (MDM2) is found in several human tumors, and increased expression of MDM2 inactivates the apoptotic and cell cycle arrest function of p53. Interleukin-16 (IL-16) is a pleiotrophic cytokine and the properties of IL-16 suggest that it involve in the pathophysiological process of chronic inflammatory diseases. In this study, we investigated the expression of MDM2 in intestinal metaplasia and gastric cancer as well as the effect of H. pylori infection and IL-16 on epithelial cell proliferation and MDM2 expression in gastric cells in vitro. The expression of MDM2 on gastric biopsies was studied immunohistochemistry. AGS cells were incubated with a combination of IL-16 and Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori). Gastric epithelial cell proliferation was studied by BrdU uptake and the expressions of MDM2 were studied by ELISA. There was no significant difference on the expression of MDM2 between with and without H. pylori infected chronic gastritis. In H. pylori infected gastric mucosa; the MDM2 expression was higher on intestinal metaplasia and gastric cancer than chronic gastritis. IL-16 administration was increased MDM2 expression and cell proliferation on AGS cells, which was decreased by H. pylori infection. In conclusion, the expression of MDM2 in long-term H. pylori infected gastric mucosa may indicate a risk for carcinogenesis. IL-16 secretion in H. pylori infected mucosa is one of the factors for gastric cancer. The expression of MDM2 on mucosa can be a mediator for gastric cancer.
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Expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 in the livers of rats treated with diethylnitrosamine.
J Clin Biochem Nutr
PUBLISHED: 01-31-2009
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It has been reported that levels of soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) in the blood are elevated in hepatocellular carcinoma patients. In the present study, serial observations of the localization of ICAM-1 in the liver were made by light and electron microscopy in rats with carcinogen-induced cancer. Male Fisher rats were given diethylnitrosamine (DEN) orally in their drinking water. Rats were sacrificed at 6, 8, 12, or 14 weeks after the start of DEN administration and the liver tissue was collected. ICAM-1 expression in liver was assessed using indirect immunoperoxidase staining with anti-rat ICAM-1 antibody. Although ICAM-1 expression by endothelial cells in livers of DEN-treated rats was lower than in the control group at 8 weeks, it was higher in the membrane and cytoplasm of hepatocytes. The expression of ICAM-1 in mesenchymal cells was decreased, paralleling development of cellular atypia, whereas in hepatocyte membranes and cytoplasm it was increased in these atypia. ICAM-1 was localized to the cytoplasm of cancer cells, but to the membrane of hepatocytes in the treated livers at 14 weeks. Furthermore, the levels of ICAM-1 in mesenchymal cells tended to be lower in the cancerous area than in the atypical hyperplastic nodule, and were reduced as the density of cell atypia increased, in comparison to cells in areas without cancerous nodules. We concluded that ICAM-1 may be influenced the development of cancer induced in the rat liver by a chemical carcinogen.
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Pathological study of archival lung tissues from five fatal cases of avian H5N1 influenza in Vietnam.
Mod. Pathol.
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Highly pathogenic avian H5N1 influenza virus (H5N1) infection in humans causes acute respiratory distress syndrome, leading to multiple organ failure. Five fatal cases of H5N1 infection in Vietnam were analyzed pathologically to reveal virus distribution, and local proinflammatory cytokine and chemokine expression profiles in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded lung tissues. Our main histopathological findings showed diffuse alveolar damage in the lungs. The infiltration of myeloperoxidase-positive and/or CD68 (clone KP-1)-positive neutrophils and monocytes/macrophages was remarkable in the alveolar septa and alveolar spaces. Immunohistochemistry revealed that H5N1 mainly infected alveolar epithelial cells and monocytes/macrophages in lungs. H5N1 replication was confirmed by detecting H5N1 mRNA in epithelial cells using in situ hybridization. Quantitation of H5N1 RNA using quantitative reverse transcription PCR assays revealed that the level of H5N1 RNA was increased in cases during early phases of the disease. We quantified the expression of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-?), interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, regulated on activation normal T-cell expressed and secreted (commonly known as RANTES), and interferon-gamma-inducible protein of 10?kDa (IP-10) in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded lung sections. Their expression levels correlated with H5N1 RNA copy numbers detected in the same lung region. Double immunofluorescence staining revealed that TNF-?, IL-6, IL-8 and IP-10 were expressed in epithelial cells and/or monocytes/macrophages. In particular, IL-6 was also expressed in endothelial cells. The dissemination of H5N1 beyond respiratory organs was not confirmed in two cases examined in this study.
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Zinc supplementation therapy improves the outcome of patients with chronic hepatitis C.
J Clin Biochem Nutr
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We administered zinc supplementation therapy over three years to patients with chronic hepatitis C and reported and that the aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alanine aminotaransferase (ALT) levels decreased, and platelet counts increased, significantly in the group with increased serum zinc concentrations. We are continuing this treatment to clarify the long-term consequences and report here the changes in serum zinc concentrations over seven years and compare the cumulative incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). We administered polaprezinc to 32 patients, randomly selected for zinc therapy (treatment group), while another 30 formed the control group. We measured the serum zinc and albumin concentrations and conducted a prospective study to determine long-term outcomes. The changes and rates of change of serum zinc concentrations after seven years were 76.7 ± 18.2 µg/dl and +0.302 ± 0.30% in the treatment group and 56.7 ± 12.4 µg/dl and +0.033 ± 0.21% in the control group and had increased significantly (p = 0.0002, p = 0.0036). Progression of liver disease seemed to vary, depending on serum albumin concentrations. In the group with baseline serum albumin concentrations of 4.0 g/dl or more, the change and rate of change of serum zinc concentrations increased significantly, and the cumulative incidence of HCC tended to decrease, in the treated group. According to multivariate analysis, the factors that contribute to a reduction in the incidence of HCC are zinc therapy (risk ratio: 0.113, 95% CI: 0.015-0.870, p = 0.0362), and platelet counts (0.766, 0.594-0.989, 0.0409). Zinc supplementation therapy seems to improve liver pathology and reduce the incidence of HCC.
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Rhabdomyolysis associated with influenza A/H1N1 2009 infection in a pediatric patient.
Pediatr Int
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The influenza A/H1N1 2009 epidemic has spread to many countries since 2009, including Japan. We report an immune-competent child involving rhabdomyolysis and compartment syndrome associated with influenza A/H1N1 2009. The patient was demonstrated rhabdomyolysis with myoglobinuria, hyperkalemia, cardiac dysfunction and compartment syndrome that arose during convalescence from influenza A/H1N1 2009 infection. Although RT-PCR of muscle tissue yielded negative results for influenza A/H1N1 2009 RNA and no viral positive-antigen cells were detected in the muscle lesions, the clinical picture suggested rhabdomyolysis associated with influenza A/H1N1. Rhabdomyolysis should be considered in the evaluation of muscle symptoms such as myalgia associated with novel influenza A/H1N1 2009 virus infection, particularly in critically ill patients.
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Cell-penetrating peptide-linked polymers as carriers for mucosal vaccine delivery.
Mol. Pharm.
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We evaluated the potential of poly(N-vinylacetamide-co-acrylic acid) modified with d-octaarginine, which is a typical cell-penetrating peptide, as a carrier for mucosal vaccine delivery. Mice were nasally inoculated four times every seventh day with PBS containing ovalbumin with or without the d-octaarginine-linked polymer. The polymer enhanced the production of ovalbumin-specific immunoglobulin G (IgG) and secreted immunoglobulin A (IgA) in the serum and the nasal cavity, respectively. Ovalbumin internalized into nasal epithelial cells appeared to stimulate IgA production. Ovalbumin transferred to systemic circulation possibly enhanced IgG production. An equivalent dose of the cholera toxin B subunit (CTB), which was used as a positive control, was superior to the polymer in enhancing antibody production; however, dose escalation of the polymer overcame this disadvantage. A similar immunization profile was also observed when ovalbumin was replaced with influenza virus HA vaccines. The polymer induced a vaccine-specific immune response identical to that induced by CTB, irrespective of the antibody type, when its dose was 10 times that of CTB. Our cell-penetrating peptide-linked polymer is a potential candidate for antigen carriers that induce humoral immunity on the mucosal surface and in systemic circulation when nasally coadministered with antigens.
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Hyperresponsivity to low-dose endotoxin during progression to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis is regulated by leptin-mediated signaling.
Cell Metab.
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Although bacterial endotoxin, such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS), plays a key role in the pathogenesis of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), detailed mechanisms of this pathogenesis remain unclear. Here, we demonstrate that upregulation of CD14 by leptin-mediated signaling is critical to hyperreactivity against endotoxin during NASH progression. Upregulation of CD14 in Kupffer cells and hyperreactivity against low-dose LPS were observed in high-fat diet (HFD)-induced steatosis mice, but not chow-fed-control mice. Hyperresponsivity against low-dose LPS led to accelerated NASH progression, including liver inflammation and fibrosis. Administering leptin in chow-fed mice caused increased hepatic expression of CD14 via STAT3 signaling, resulting in hyperreactivity against low-dose LPS without steatosis. In contrast, a marked decrease in hepatic CD14 expression was observed in leptin-deficient ob/ob mice, despite severe steatosis. Our results indicate that obesity-induced leptin plays a crucial role in NASH progression via enhanced responsivity to endotoxin, and we propose a mechanism of bacteria-mediated progression of NASH.
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Performance of cell-penetrating peptide-linked polymers physically mixed with poorly membrane-permeable molecules on cell membranes.
Eur J Pharm Biopharm
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We are investigating a new class of penetration enhancers that enable poorly membrane-permeable molecules physically mixed with them to effectively penetrate cell membranes without their concomitant cellular uptake. Since we previously revealed that poly(N-vinylacetamide-co-acrylic acid) modified with d-octaarginine, which is a typical cell-penetrating peptide, significantly enhanced the nasal absorption of insulin, we examined the performance of the polymers on cell membranes. When Caco-2 cells were incubated with 5(6)-carboxyfluorescein (CF) for 30 min, approximately 0.1% of applied CF was internalized into the cells. This poor membrane permeability was dramatically enhanced by d-octaarginine-linked polymers; a 25-fold increase in the cellular uptake of CF was observed when the polymer concentration was adjusted to 0.2mg/mL. None of the individual components, for example, d-octaarginine, had any influence on CF uptake, demonstrating that only d-octaarginine anchored chemically to the polymeric platform enhanced the membrane permeation of CF. The polymer-induced CF uptake was consistently high even when the incubation time was extended to 120 min. Confocal laser scanning microphotographs of cells incubated with d-octaarginine-linked polymers bearing rhodamine red demonstrated that the cell outline was stained with red fluorescence. The polymer-induced CF uptake was significantly suppressed by 5-(N-ethyl-N-isopropyl)amiloride, which is an inhibitor of macropinocytosis. Results indicated that d-octaarginine-linked polymers remained on the cell membrane and poorly membrane-permeable CF was continuously internalized into cells mainly via macropinocytosis repeated for the individual peptidyl branches in the polymer backbone.
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Newly established monoclonal antibodies for immunological detection of H5N1 influenza virus.
Jpn. J. Infect. Dis.
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The H5N1 subtype of the highly pathogenic (HP) avian influenza virus has been recognized for its ability to cause serious pandemics among humans. In the present study, new monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against viral proteins were established for the immunological detection of H5N1 influenza virus for research and diagnostic purposes. B-cell hybridomas were generated from mice that had been hyperimmunized with purified A/Vietnam/1194/2004 (NIBRG-14) virion that had been inactivated by UV-irradiation or formaldehyde. After screening over 4,000 hybridomas, eight H5N1-specific clones were selected. Six were specific for hemagglutinin (HA) and had in vitro neutralization activity. Of these, four were able to broadly detect all tested clades of the H5N1 strains. Five HA-specific mAbs detected denatured HA epitope(s) in Western blot analysis, and two detected HP influenza virus by immunofluorescence and immunohistochemistry. A highly sensitive antigen-capture sandwich ELISA system was established by combining mAbs with different specificities. In conclusion, these mAbs may be useful for rapid and specific diagnosis of H5N1 influenza. Therapeutically, they may have a role in antibody-based treatment of the disease.
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JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

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