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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Low Mortality of Staphylococcus aureus Bacteremia in Icelandic Children - Nationwide Study on Incidence and Outcome.
Pediatr. Infect. Dis. J.
PUBLISHED: 07-04-2014
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Staphylococcus aureus is a major cause of blood stream infections, but population based studies on pediatric S. aureus bacteremia (SAB) are sparse. The objective of the study was to evaluate the incidence and mortality of SAB in Icelandic children over time, and to assess the proportions of nosocomial and health-care associated infections.
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The role and utilisation of public health evaluations in Europe: a case study of national hand hygiene campaigns.
BMC Public Health
PUBLISHED: 01-27-2014
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Evaluations are essential to judge the success of public health programmes. In Europe, the proportion of public health programmes that undergo evaluation remains unclear. The European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control sought to determine the frequency of evaluations amongst European national public health programmes by using national hand hygiene campaigns as an example of intervention.
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[Epidemiology of needlesticks at Landspítali University Hospital during the years 1986-2011. A descriptive study[Journal Article].]
Laeknabladid
PUBLISHED: 12-19-2013
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Introduction: Needlesticks, bodyfluid exposure and bites (incident) put healthcare workers (HCWs) at risk of hepatitis B, C and HIV particularly if patients are infected (high risk incident). The risk of infection is greatest from bore-hollow needles. The aim of the study was to describe the epidemiology of reported incidents and evaluate underreporting by HCWs at Landspítali University Hospital (LUH). Methods: A retrospective descriptive study of reported incidents during 1986-2011. The ratio of incidents was calculated according to the HCWs age and profession and distribution by source and wards. The ratio of high risk incidents and vaccination status against HBV at time of incident was determined as well as underreporting during 01.01.2005-31.12.2011. Results: At least 4089 incidents occured during the study period but 3587 were reported and blood samples taken from 2578 patients. Approximately a third of the incidents were associated with non-compliance with standard precaution and 54,7% of needlesticks were associated with bore-hollow needles. Few reports came from physicians and medical students (17,9%). During the study period 50,3% HCWs were vaccinated against HBV at time of incident. High risk incidents were 94 (2.6%), mostly related to hepatitis C (64,9%). Two HCWs became infected with HCV. During 2005-2011 underreporting was estimated to be 28,0%. Conclusion: Improved education of standard precaution when handling needles and sharps at LUH may reduce the number of incidents. Introduction of safety-needles and safety-devices may greatly reduce needlesticks as a large number of incidents were associated with hollow needles. Improved HBV vaccination among HCWs and reporting incidents should be encouraged. Key words: Sharps and needlestick injuries, blood and bodyfluid exposure, health care worker, Bloodborne pathogens, HBV vaccination coverage, occupational health. Correspondence: Asdis Elfarsdottir Jelle, asdiself@landspitali.is.
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Clinical significance of Staphylococcus aureus bacteriuria in a nationwide study of adults with S. aureus bacteraemia.
J. Infect.
PUBLISHED: 07-20-2011
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To evaluate the clinical significance of Staphylococcus aureus bacteriuria (SABU) in adults with S. aureus bacteraemia (SAB).
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Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia--Nationwide assessment of treatment adequacy and outcome.
J. Infect.
PUBLISHED: 02-25-2011
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To assess the treatment adequacy for Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia (SAB) and its association with outcome on a whole population basis.
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Changing epidemiology of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Iceland from 2000 to 2008: a challenge to current guidelines.
J. Clin. Microbiol.
PUBLISHED: 09-15-2010
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The epidemiology of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is continuously changing. Iceland has a low incidence of MRSA. A "search and destroy" policy (screening patients with defined risk factors and attempting eradication in carriers) has been implemented since 1991. Clinical and microbiological data of all MRSA patients from the years 2000 to 2008 were collected prospectively. Isolates were characterized by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), sequencing of the repeat region of the Staphylococcus protein A gene (spa typing), staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) typing, and screening for the Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) gene. Two hundred twenty-six infected (60%) or colonized (40%) individuals were detected (annual incidence 2.5 to 16/100,000). From 2000 to 2003, two health care-associated outbreaks dominated (spa types t037 and t2802), which were successfully controlled with extensive infection control measures. After 2004, an increasing number of community-associated (CA) cases without relation to the health care system occurred. A great variety of clones (40 PFGE types and 49 spa types) were found, reflecting an influx of MRSA from abroad. The USA300 and Southwest Pacific (SWP) clones were common. SCCmec type IV was most common (72%), and 38% of the isolates were PVL positive. The incidence of MRSA in Iceland has increased since 1999 but remains low and has been stable in the last years. The search and destroy policy was effective to control MRSA in the health care setting. However, MRSA in Iceland is now shifting into the community, challenging the current Icelandic guidelines, which are tailored to the health care system.
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[Intensive care patients with influenza A (H1N1) infection in Iceland 2009].
Laeknabladid
PUBLISHED: 02-02-2010
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We describe the main characteristics of patients that required intensive care due to the influenza (H1N1) outbreak in 2009.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.