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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Growth inhibition, cell-cycle alteration and apoptosis in stimulated human peripheral blood lymphocytes by multiwalled carbon nanotube buckypaper.
Nanomedicine (Lond)
PUBLISHED: 05-15-2014
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Aim: This study was designed to investigate the cytotoxicity of multiwalled carbon nanotube buckypaper (BP) in stimulated human peripheral blood lymphocytes. Methods & results: BP treatment led to a delay in the cell growth, as proven by a minor increase in the cell number over time relative to that seen in untreated cells, assessed by trypan blue, resazurin and neutral red assays. The analysis of cell-cycle profile, by propidium iodide staining, indicated that BP treatment blocked cell-cycle progression by arresting cells at the G0/G1 phase. Moreover, increased apoptosis was also recorded by Annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate/propidium iodide staining. Conclusion: The results presented here demonstrate an inhibitor effect of BP on cell growth that was likely through cytostatic and cytotoxic events. Original submitted 21 June 2013; Revised submitted 10 January 2014.
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Adaptive response in human blood lymphocytes exposed to non-ionizing radiofrequency fields: resistance to ionizing radiation-induced damage.
J. Radiat. Res.
PUBLISHED: 08-26-2013
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The aim of this preliminary investigation was to assess whether human peripheral blood lymphocytes which have been pre-exposed to non-ionizing radiofrequency fields exhibit an adaptive response (AR) by resisting the induction of genetic damage from subsequent exposure to ionizing radiation. Peripheral blood lymphocytes from four healthy donors were stimulated with phytohemagglutinin for 24 h and then exposed for 20 h to 1950 MHz radiofrequency fields (RF, adaptive dose, AD) at an average specific absorption rate of 0.3 W/kg. At 48 h, the cells were subjected to a challenge dose (CD) of 1.0 or 1.5 Gy X-irradiation (XR, challenge dose, CD). After a 72 h total culture period, cells were collected to examine the incidence of micronuclei (MN). There was a significant decrease in the number of MN in lymphocytes exposed to RF + XR (AD + CD) as compared with those subjected to XR alone (CD). These observations thus suggested a RF-induced AR and induction of resistance to subsequent damage from XR. There was variability between the donors in RF-induced AR. The data reported in our earlier investigations also indicated a similar induction of AR in human blood lymphocytes that had been pre-exposed to RF (AD) and subsequently treated with a chemical mutagen, mitomycin C (CD). Since XR and mitomycin-C induce different kinds of lesions in cellular DNA, further studies are required to understand the mechanism(s) involved in the RF-induced adaptive response.
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DNA electrophoretic migration patterns change after exposure of Jurkat cells to a single intense nanosecond electric pulse.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 09-26-2011
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Intense nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEFs) interact with cellular membranes and intracellular structures. Investigating how cells respond to nanosecond pulses is essential for a) development of biomedical applications of nsPEFs, including cancer therapy, and b) better understanding of the mechanisms underlying such bioelectrical effects. In this work, we explored relatively mild exposure conditions to provide insight into weak, reversible effects, laying a foundation for a better understanding of the interaction mechanisms and kinetics underlying nsPEF bio-effects. In particular, we report changes in the nucleus of Jurkat cells (human lymphoblastoid T cells) exposed to single pulses of 60 ns duration and 1.0, 1.5 and 2.5 MV/m amplitudes, which do not affect cell growth and viability. A dose-dependent reduction in alkaline comet-assayed DNA migration is observed immediately after nsPEF exposure, accompanied by permeabilization of the plasma membrane (YO-PRO-1 uptake). Comet assay profiles return to normal within 60 minutes after pulse delivery at the highest pulse amplitude tested, indicating that our exposure protocol affects the nucleus, modifying DNA electrophoretic migration patterns.
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Induction of adaptive response in human blood lymphocytes exposed to 900 MHz radiofrequency fields: influence of cell cycle.
Int. J. Radiat. Biol.
PUBLISHED: 05-11-2011
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To investigate the influence of cell cycle on the adaptive response (AR) induced by the exposure of human blood lymphocytes to radiofrequency fields (RF).
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DNA damage by carbon nanotubes using the single cell gel electrophoresis technique.
Methods Mol. Biol.
PUBLISHED: 04-28-2010
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The single-cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE) or comet assay is a simple and sensitive method for quantitatively measuring DNA breakage and repair in individual cells. It can be applied to proliferating and non-proliferating cells and cells of those tissues, which are the first contact sites for mutagenic/carcinogenic substances. In this technique, cells are embedded in agarose, lysed, subjected to electrophoresis, and stained with a fluorescent DNA-binding dye. Cells with increased DNA damage display increased DNA migration from the nucleus toward the anode, which resembles the shape of a comet. The migration is observed by fluorescence microscopy after staining with a fluorescent DNA-binding dye, and the intensity of the comet tail reflects the number of DNA breaks. The assay is performed in almost all eukaryotic cells and has applications in many fields, including genetic toxicology, biomonitoring, ecotoxicology, medical, and nutritional research. The assay is a very sensitive tool to investigate the effect of carbon nanotubes on DNA of human cells in vitro. This chapter describes a procedure to perform the comet assay, in its alkaline version, on cell cultures treated with carbon nanotubes.
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Radiofrequency radiation at 1950 MHz (UMTS) does not affect key cellular endpoints in neuron-like PC12 cells.
Bioelectromagnetics
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In this study, rat pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells were exposed, as a model of neuron-like cells, to 1950 MHz radiofrequency (RF) radiation with a signal used by the 3G wireless technology of the Universal Mobile Telecommunications System (UMTS) to assess possible adverse effects. RF exposure for 24 h at a specific absorption rate (SAR) of 10 W/kg was carried out in a waveguide system under accurately controlled environmental and dosimetric parameters. DNA integrity, cell viability, and apoptosis were investigated as cellular endpoints relevant for carcinogenesis and other diseases of the central nervous system. Very sensitive biological assays were employed to assess the effects immediately after RF exposure and 24 h later, as demonstrated by the cellular response elicited in PC12 cells using positive control treatments provided for each assay. In our experimental conditions, 24 h of RF exposure at a carrier frequency and modulation scheme typical of a UMTS signal was not able to elicit any effect in the selected cellular endpoints in undifferentiated PC12 cells, despite the application of a higher SAR value than those applied in the majority of the studies reported in the literature.
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Automated segmentation of comet assay images using Gaussian filtering and fuzzy clustering.
Med Biol Eng Comput
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Comet assay is one of the most popular tests for the detection of DNA damage at single cell level. In this study, an algorithm for comet assay analysis has been proposed, aiming to minimize user interaction and providing reproducible measurements. The algorithm comprises two-steps: (a) comet identification via Gaussian pre-filtering and morphological operators; (b) comet segmentation via fuzzy clustering. The algorithm has been evaluated using comet images from human leukocytes treated with a commonly used DNA damaging agent. A comparison of the proposed approach with a commercial system has been performed. Results show that fuzzy segmentation can increase overall sensitivity, giving benefits in bio-monitoring studies where weak genotoxic effects are expected.
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Induction of an adaptive response in human blood lymphocytes exposed to radiofrequency fields: influence of the universal mobile telecommunication system (UMTS) signal and the specific absorption rate.
Mutat. Res.
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The induction of an adaptive response (AR) was examined in human peripheral blood lymphocytes exposed to non-ionizing radiofrequency fields (RF). Cells from nine healthy human volunteers were stimulated for 24h with phytohaemagglutinin and then exposed for 20h to an adaptive dose (AD) of a 1950MHz RF UMTS (universal mobile telecommunication system) signal used for mobile communications, at different specific absorption rates (SAR) of 1.25, 0.6, 0.3, and 0.15W/kg. This was followed by treatment of the cells at 48h with a challenge dose (CD) of 100ng/ml mitomycin C (MMC). Lymphocytes were collected at the end of the 72h total culture period. The cytokinesis-block method was used to record the frequency of micronuclei (MN) as genotoxicity end-point. When lymphocytes from six donors were pre-exposed to RF at 0.3W/kg SAR and then treated with MMC, these cells showed a significant reduction in the frequency of MN, compared with the cells treated with MMC alone; this result is indicative of induction of AR. The results from our earlier study indicated that lymphocytes that were stimulated for 24h, exposed for 20h to a 900MHz RF GSM (global system for mobile communication) signal at 1.25W/kg SAR and then treated with 100ng/ml MMC, also exhibited AR. These overall data suggest that the induction of AR depends on RF frequency, type of the signal and SAR. Further characterization of RF-induced AR is in progress.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.