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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
A comparison of unilateral and bilateral laminotomies for decompression of L4-L5 spinal stenosis.
Spine
PUBLISHED: 12-14-2011
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A retrospective review of clinical and radiographic data was performed at a single institution.
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Giant epidermal inclusion facial cyst.
J Craniofac Surg
PUBLISHED: 05-19-2011
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Epidermal inclusion cyst is one of the most common subcutaneous tumors, and its size normally varies from 1 to 5 cm in diameter. Only few giant epidermal inclusion cysts have been reported in the literature, and giant epidermal cyst of the face has never been reported. An 83-year-old woman visited our hospital for a huge mass on the right side of her face extending to the temporal area, creating deformity of her right ear. The mass was 15 × 15 × 8 cm(3) with soft, cystic nature. It has developed since 20 years ago with no known etiology. Computed tomography scan was obtained for preoperative evaluation, which showed a 15 × 15 × 7-cm(3) huge, lobulated, and septated mass with no underlying bone or brain involvement. We performed complete excision sand biopsy. On histologic examination, the final diagnosis of epidermal inclusion cyst was made. Keratotic material was within the cyst, and the cystic wall was composed of lamellate keratin. Follow-up period was 10 months, and no signs of recurrence were seen. The patient was satisfied with the improvement of her facial appearance. We have observed a case of giant epidermal inclusion cyst of the face, which has never been reported, and present this case with a brief review of literature.
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Comparison of multilevel oblique corpectomy with and without image guided navigation for multi-segmental cervical spondylotic myelopathy.
Comput. Aided Surg.
PUBLISHED: 12-08-2010
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Multilevel Oblique Corpectomy (MOC) is an emerging technique for surgical treatment of multi-segmental cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM) featuring extensive ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL). However, the use of an oblique drilling plane is unfamiliar to most surgeons and there is no anatomical landmark present on the posterior portion of the vertebral body. To overcome these difficulties, the authors used intraoperative C-arm-based image guided navigation (IGN), and this study was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of IGN in MOC.
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Nodular fasciitis in the forehead.
J Craniofac Surg
PUBLISHED: 05-21-2010
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Histologically, nodular fasciitis is observed as similar to sarcoma in soft tissues, and it is referred to as pseudosarcomatous fasciitis. Its histologic findings can be summarized as spindle-shaped fibroblasts, intercellular space between fibroblasts, red blood cells released to the extravascular area, and deposition of mucus within the interstitium. The lesion looks similar to sarcoma histologically and shows the characteristic of rapid growth, which in result is readily misdiagnosed as malignancy. It occurs preferentially in the upper extremities, whereas rarely occurring in the head and neck region. When we encounter subcutaneous nodules of the head and neck region, it is important to keep nodular fasciitis in mind as a differential diagnosis to avoid unnecessary wide resection. In this article, we report a rare case of nodular fasciitis on the forehead and some reviews of the literature.
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Extraforaminal lumbar interbody fusion for the treatment of isthmic spondylolisthesis.
J Spinal Disord Tech
PUBLISHED: 05-05-2009
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A preliminary study about extraforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (ELIF) technique for the treatment of isthmic spondylolisthesis.
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Efficacy of biodegradable synthetic polyurethane foam for packing nasal bone fractures.
J Craniofac Surg
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Nasal bone fracture is the most common traumatic disease among facial bone fractures. General treatment of this trauma is closed reduction, followed by intranasal packing. Vaseline or Furacin roll gauze, and Merocel are commonly used packing materials, but the pain produced while removing the packing is fearful for the patients. To compensate for this shortcoming, there has been an increased use of biodegradable synthetic polyurethane foam (SPF) recently. We performed a retrospective review to analyze the effectiveness of SPF after the closed reduction of nasal bone fracture.
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Large median palatine cyst.
J Craniofac Surg
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Median palatine cyst is a rare fissural cyst of nonodontogenic origin located in the midline of the hard palate, posterior to the palatine papilla. Only 21 cases have been reported in the literature, and documented here is a median palatine cyst of the largest dimension thus far.A 14-year-old male patient presented with a 5 × 5-cm(3) mass distal to the palatine papilla of 5 years duration. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a 5.3 × 4.6 × 4.2-cm(3) cystic mass involving the midline of the hard palate. Complete enucleation of the cyst was performed with no recurrence, but an oronasal fistula developed 13 months postoperatively. A 1 × 4-cm(2) posteriorly based oral mucoperiosteal rotational flap was designed, raised, and transposed to reconstruct the palate. The oral mucoperiosteal flap was viable, and no sign of fistula was found 3 years postoperatively.Treatment of medial palatine cysts through enucleation is known to be relatively simple and curative. However, large lesions may lead to large defects that require a method of reconstruction and may also elicit bony defects in the hard palate, leading to an increase in postoperative complications such as oronasal fistulas.We report our experience of a large median palatine cyst, the largest documented to date, with a brief review of the literature.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.