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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
The prevalence of, and factors associated with, paying for sex among men resident in Britain: findings from the third National Survey of Sexual Attitudes and Lifestyles (Natsal-3).
Sex Transm Infect
PUBLISHED: 11-19-2014
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Men who pay for sex (MPS) are considered a bridging population for sexually transmitted infections (STI). However, the extent, characteristics and role of MPS in transmission is poorly understood. We investigate these questions using data from Britain's third National Survey of Sexual Attitudes and Lifestyles (Natsal-3).
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Prospective evaluation of a complex public health intervention: lessons from an initial and follow-up cross-sectional survey of the tuberculosis strain typing service in England.
BMC Public Health
PUBLISHED: 09-03-2014
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The national tuberculosis strain typing service (TB-STS) was introduced in England in 2010. The TB-STS involves MIRU-VNTR typing of isolates from all TB patients for the prospective identification, reporting and investigation of TB strain typing clusters. As part of a mixed-method evaluation, we report on a repeated cross-sectional survey to illustrate the challenges surrounding the evaluation of a complex national public health intervention.
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Strengthening the Reporting of Molecular Epidemiology for Infectious Diseases (STROME-ID): an extension of the STROBE statement.
Lancet Infect Dis
PUBLISHED: 03-14-2014
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Molecular data are now widely used in epidemiological studies to investigate the transmission, distribution, biology, and diversity of pathogens. Our objective was to establish recommendations to support good scientific reporting of molecular epidemiological studies to encourage authors to consider specific threats to valid inference. The statement Strengthening the Reporting of Molecular Epidemiology for Infectious Diseases (STROME-ID) builds upon the Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (STROBE) initiative. The STROME-ID statement was developed by a working group of epidemiologists, statisticians, bioinformaticians, virologists, and microbiologists with expertise in control of infection and communicable diseases. The statement focuses on issues relating to the reporting of epidemiological studies of infectious diseases using molecular data that were not addressed by STROBE. STROME-ID addresses terminology, measures of genetic diversity within pathogen populations, laboratory methods, sample collection, use of molecular markers, molecular clocks, timeframe, multiple-strain infections, non-independence of infectious-disease data, missing data, ascertainment bias, consistency between molecular and epidemiological data, and ethical considerations with respect to infectious-disease research. In total, 20 items were added to the 22 item STROBE checklist. When used, the STROME-ID recommendations should advance the quality and transparency of scientific reporting, with clear benefits for evidence reviews and health-policy decision making.
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Lifetime prevalence, associated factors, and circumstances of non-volitional sex in women and men in Britain: findings from the third National Survey of Sexual Attitudes and Lifestyles (Natsal-3).
Lancet
PUBLISHED: 11-26-2013
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Sexual violence is increasingly recognised as a public health issue. Information about prevalence, associated factors, and consequences for health in the population of Britain (England, Scotland, and Wales) is scarce. The third National Survey of Sexual Health Attitudes and Lifestyles (Natsal-3) is the first of the Natsal surveys to include questions about sexual violence and the first population-based survey in Britain to explore the issue outside the context of crime.
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Associations between health and sexual lifestyles in Britain: findings from the third National Survey of Sexual Attitudes and Lifestyles (Natsal-3).
Lancet
PUBLISHED: 11-26-2013
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Physical and mental health could greatly affect sexual activity and fulfilment, but the nature of associations at a population level is poorly understood. We used data from the third National Survey of Sexual Attitudes and Lifestyles (Natsal-3) to explore associations between health and sexual lifestyles in Britain (England, Scotland, and Wales).
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Sexual function in Britain: findings from the third National Survey of Sexual Attitudes and Lifestyles (Natsal-3).
Lancet
PUBLISHED: 11-26-2013
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Despite its importance to sexual health and wellbeing, sexual function is given little attention in sexual health policy. Population-based studies are needed to understand sexual function across the life course.
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The prevalence of unplanned pregnancy and associated factors in Britain: findings from the third National Survey of Sexual Attitudes and Lifestyles (Natsal-3).
Lancet
PUBLISHED: 11-26-2013
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Unplanned pregnancy is a key public health indicator. We describe the prevalence of unplanned pregnancy, and associated factors, in a general population sample in Britain (England, Scotland, and Wales).
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Prevalence, risk factors, and uptake of interventions for sexually transmitted infections in Britain: findings from the National Surveys of Sexual Attitudes and Lifestyles (Natsal).
Lancet
PUBLISHED: 11-26-2013
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Population-based estimates of prevalence, risk distribution, and intervention uptake inform delivery of control programmes for sexually transmitted infections (STIs). We undertook the third National Survey of Sexual Attitudes and Lifestyles (Natsal-3) after implementation of national sexual health strategies, and describe the epidemiology of four STIs in Britain (England, Scotland, and Wales) and the uptake of interventions.
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Changes in sexual attitudes and lifestyles in Britain through the life course and over time: findings from the National Surveys of Sexual Attitudes and Lifestyles (Natsal).
Lancet
PUBLISHED: 11-26-2013
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Sexual behaviour and relationships are key components of wellbeing and are affected by social norms, attitudes, and health. We present data on sexual behaviours and attitudes in Britain (England, Scotland, and Wales) from the three National Surveys of Sexual Attitudes and Lifestyles (Natsal).
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Consistency in reporting sensitive sexual behaviours in Britain: change in reporting bias in the second and third National Surveys of Sexual Attitudes and Lifestyles (Natsal-2 and Natsal-3).
Sex Transm Infect
PUBLISHED: 11-25-2013
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Britains second National Survey of Sexual Attitudes and Lifestyles (Natsal-2) was conducted in 1999-2001 and the third (Natsal-3) was conducted in 2010-2012 to update prevalence estimates of sexual behaviours and assess changes over time. We investigated whether there was a change in reporting bias between these two cross-sectional surveys.
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Methodology of the third British National Survey of Sexual Attitudes and Lifestyles (Natsal-3).
Sex Transm Infect
PUBLISHED: 11-25-2013
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Data from the first two National Surveys of Sexual Attitudes and Lifestyles, carried out in 1990-1991 (Natsal-1) and 1999-2001 (Natsal-2), have been extensively used to inform sexual health policy in Britain over the past two decades. Natsal-3 was carried out from September 2010 to August 2012 in order to provide up-to-date measures of sexual lifestyles and to extend the scope of the previous studies by including an older age group (up to 74 years), an extended range of topics and biological measures.
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Respondent driven sampling: determinants of recruitment and a method to improve point estimation.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2013
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Respondent-driven sampling (RDS) is a variant of a link-tracing design intended for generating unbiased estimates of the composition of hidden populations that typically involves giving participants several coupons to recruit their peers into the study. RDS may generate biased estimates if coupons are distributed non-randomly or if potential recruits present for interview non-randomly. We explore if biases detected in an RDS study were due to either of these mechanisms, and propose and apply weights to reduce bias due to non-random presentation for interview.
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Evaluation of the role of location and distance in recruitment in respondent-driven sampling.
Int J Health Geogr
PUBLISHED: 08-18-2011
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Respondent-driven sampling(RDS) is an increasingly widely used variant of a link tracing design for recruiting hidden populations. The role of the spatial distribution of the target population has not been robustly examined for RDS. We examine patterns of recruitment by location, and how they may have biased an RDS study findings.
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Missed opportunities in TB diagnosis: a TB process-based performance review tool to evaluate and improve clinical care.
BMC Public Health
PUBLISHED: 02-22-2011
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Traditional tuberculosis (TB) treatment outcome measures, such as cure rate, do not provide insight into the underlying reasons for missing clinical targets. We evaluated a TB Process-Based Performance Review (TB-PBPR) tool, developed to identify "missed opportunities" for timely and accurate diagnosis of TB. The tool enables performance assessment at the level of process and quality of care.
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A geographically-restricted but prevalent Mycobacterium tuberculosis strain identified in the West Midlands Region of the UK between 1995 and 2008.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 02-20-2011
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We describe the identification of, and risk factors for, the single most prevalent Mycobacterium tuberculosis strain in the West Midlands region of the UK.
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Unnatural deaths in South African platinum miners, 1992-2008.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-21-2011
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The mortality rate from unnatural deaths for South Africa is nearly double the world average. Reliable data are limited by inaccurate and incomplete ascertainment of specific causes of unnatural death. This study describes trends in causes of unnatural death between 1992 and 2008 in a cohort of South African miners.
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The effect of HIV infection on time off work in a large cohort of gold miners with known dates of seroconversion.
Occup Environ Med
PUBLISHED: 11-28-2010
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To estimate the effect of HIV infection on time off work. To provide baseline estimates for economic and actuarial models, and for evaluations of ART and other workplace interventions.
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Tuberculosis and survival of HIV-infected individuals by time since seroconversion.
AIDS
PUBLISHED: 03-20-2010
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In a cohort of 1950 HIV-positive men with known dates of HIV seroconversion, 399 developed tuberculosis. Mortality rates following tuberculosis were greatly increased (hazard ratio, adjusted for age at seroconversion, 4.7, 95% confidence interval 3.7-6.1), and this ratio was similar at different times following seroconversion. Overall mortality was similar to that in western seroconverter cohorts with much lower rates of tuberculosis, suggesting that tuberculosis is more a marker of HIV progression than a cause of it.
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High rates of recurrence in HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected patients with tuberculosis.
J. Infect. Dis.
PUBLISHED: 02-04-2010
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The rate of recurrent tuberculosis disease due to reinfection, compared with the incidence of new tuberculosis, in those with and without HIV infection is not known.
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Who has sex with whom? Characteristics of heterosexual partnerships reported in a national probability survey and implications for STI risk.
Int J Epidemiol
PUBLISHED: 03-26-2009
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Sexually transmitted infection (STI) risk is determined both by partner numbers and partnership characteristics. Studies describing only recent partnership(s) overestimate long-term partnerships and underestimate the contribution of casual partnerships to STI transmission in populations. We describe all heterosexual partnerships in the past year in terms of partnership type, age and geographical mixing and how these characteristics relate to condom use.
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Insertion site mapping for repeated elements in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.
J. Microbiol. Methods
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Insertion elements not only act as genetic markers for differentiation of bacteria but their movement in bacterial genomes likely plays an essential role in changing the physical and biochemical traits of the organisms when adapting to new environments. Genomic Insertion Site mapping of transposable elements could shed light on the putative altered function of adjacent genes. In the era of whole genome sequencing where repeat elements are difficult to sequence with short read technologies and in the absence of high throughput technologies especially in poorer resource settings, an alternative approach to their characterisation is needed. A rapid and simple method of insertion site mapping that uses Insertion Sequence 6110 (IS6110) fluorescent amplified fragment length polymorphism (FAFLP) PCR as a foundation and then uses additional selective bases to reduce the number of fragments generated was developed. This was applied to Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv sequenced strain to compare the experimental data with the in silico results. This was successfully achieved for all but two of the sixteen fragments generated by FAFLP and demonstrated that, by using this technique, insertion sites can be mapped onto the genomes of M. tuberculosis.
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The impact of HIV, an antiretroviral programme and tuberculosis on mortality in South African platinum miners, 1992-2010.
PLoS ONE
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HIV and tuberculosis (TB) are the most common causes of death in South Africa. Antiretroviral therapy (ART) programmes should have had an impact on mortality rates. This study describes the impact of HIV, a Wellness (HIV/ART) programme and TB on population-wide trends in mortality and causes of death among South African platinum miners, from before the HIV epidemic into the ART era.
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Improving questions on sexual partnerships: lessons learned from cognitive interviews for Britains third National Survey of Sexual Attitudes and Lifestyles ("Natsal-3").
Arch Sex Behav
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Patterns of sexual partnership formation and dissolution are key drivers of sexually transmitted infection transmission. Sexual behavior survey participants may be unable or unwilling to report accurate details about their sexual partners, limiting the potential to capture information on sexual mixing and timing of partnerships. We examined how questions were interpreted, including recall strategies and judgments made in selecting responses, to inform development of a module on recent sexual partnerships in Britains third National Survey of Sexual Attitudes and Lifestyles ("Natsal-3"). Face-to-face cognitive interviews were conducted with 14 men and 18 women aged 18-74 years, during development work for Natsal-3. People with multiple recent partners were purposively sampled and questions were presented as a computer-assisted self-interview. Participants were generally agreeable to answering questions about their sexual partners and practices. Interpretation of questions designed to measure concurrent (overlapping) partnerships was broadly consistent with the epidemiological concept of concurrency. Partners ages, genders, ethnicity, and participants perceptions of whether partner(s) had had concurrent partnerships were reported without offense. Recall problems and lack of knowledge were reported by some participants (of all ages), especially about former, casual, and/or new partnerships, and some reported guessing partners ages and dates of sex. Generally, participants were able to answer questions about their sexual partners accurately, even when repeated for multiple partners. Cognitive interviews provided insight into the participants understanding of, ability to answer, and willingness to answer questions. This enabled us to improve questions used in previous surveys, refine new questions, and ensure the questionnaire order was logical for participants.
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Epidemiology of, and behavioural risk factors for, sexually transmitted human papillomavirus infection in men and women in Britain.
Sex Transm Infect
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Persistent infection with high-risk sexually transmitted human papillomaviruses (HR-HPVs) can lead to development of cervical and other cancers, while low-risk types (low-risk HPV) may cause genital warts. We explored the epidemiology of different HPV types in men and women and their association with demographic and behavioural variables.
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Testing for sexually transmitted infections in a population-based sexual health survey: development of an acceptable ethical approach.
J Med Ethics
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Population-based research is enhanced by biological measures, but biological sampling raises complex ethical issues. The third British National Survey of Sexual Attitudes and Lifestyles (Natsal-3) will estimate the population prevalence of five sexually transmitted infections (STIs) (Chlamydia trachomatis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, human papillomavirus (HPV), HIV and Mycoplasma genitalium) in a probability sample aged 16-44 years. The present work describes the development of an ethical approach to urine testing for STIs, including the process of reaching consensus on whether to return results. The following issues were considered: (1) testing for some STIs that are treatable and for which appropriate settings to obtain free testing and advice are widely available (Natsal-3 provides all respondents with STI and healthcare access information), (2) limits on test accuracy and timeliness imposed by survey conditions and sample type, (3) testing for some STIs with unknown clinical and public health implications, (4) how a uniform approach is easier to explain and understand, (5) practical difficulties in returning results and cost efficiency, such as enabling wider STI testing by not returning results. The agreed approach, to perform voluntary anonymous testing with specific consent for five STIs without returning results, was approved by stakeholders and a research ethics committee. Overall, this was acceptable to respondents in developmental piloting; 61% (68 of 111) of respondents agreed to provide a sample. The experiences reported here may inform the ethical decision making of researchers, research ethics committees and funders considering population-based biological sampling.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.