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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Epidemiology and antimicrobial resistance of international travel-associated Campylobacter infections in the United States, 2005-2011.
Am J Public Health
PUBLISHED: 05-15-2014
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The objective of this study was to determine the role international travel plays in US Campylobacter epidemiology and antimicrobial resistance.
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Complications among adults hospitalized with influenza: a comparison of seasonal influenza and the 2009 H1N1 pandemic.
Clin. Infect. Dis.
PUBLISHED: 04-29-2014
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Persons with influenza can develop complications that result in hospitalization and death. These are most commonly respiratory related, but cardiovascular or neurologic complications or exacerbations of underlying chronic medical conditions may also occur. Patterns of complications observed during pandemics may differ from typical influenza seasons, and characterizing variations in influenza-related complications can provide a better understanding of the impact of pandemics and guide appropriate clinical management and planning for the future.
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Assisting people with dementia with their medicines: experiences of family carers.
Int J Pharm Pract
PUBLISHED: 04-10-2014
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Many family carers provide assistance with medicines that is vital for optimal clinical outcomes. Medicines-related tasks are known to contribute to carer burden and stress. This study examined the experiences of family carers when providing medicines-related assistance for a person with dementia, to indicate how services could become more responsive to the specific needs of this group of carers.
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Nonclinical safety of mavrilimumab, an anti-GMCSF receptor alpha monoclonal antibody, in cynomolgus monkeys: relevance for human safety.
Toxicol. Appl. Pharmacol.
PUBLISHED: 03-04-2014
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Mavrilimumab (CAM-3001) is an investigational human IgG4 monoclonal antibody (MAb) targeting GM-CSF receptor alpha which is currently being developed for the treatment of RA. GM-CSF plays a central role in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) through the activation, differentiation, and survival of macrophages and neutrophils. To support clinical development, the nonclinical safety of mavrilimumab was evaluated in several studies with cynomolgus monkeys as the pharmacologically relevant species. Comprehensive toxicity parameters were assessed in each study, and treatment duration ranged from 4 to 26weeks. Mavrilimumab has an acceptable safety profile in monkeys with no changes in any parameters other than microscopic findings in lung. In several studies, minimal accumulation of foamy alveolar macrophages was observed. This finding was only seen in studies of at least 11weeks duration, was reversible following a dose-free recovery period and was considered non-adverse. At higher dose levels (?30mg/kg/week), in a 26-week repeat-IV dose study, the presence of lung foreign material, cholesterol clefts, and granulomatous inflammation was also observed in a few animals and was considered adverse. The dose- and time-related accumulation of foamy macrophages in lung following exposure to mavrilimumab observed in several NHP studies was expected based upon the known role of GM-CSFR? signaling in the function of alveolar macrophages. Overall, a clean no-observed-adverse-effect-level (NOAEL) without any effects in lung was established and provided adequate clinical safety margins. In clinical studies in RA patients, mavrilimumab has demonstrated good clinical activity with adequate safety to support further clinical development. A Phase 2b study of mavrilimumab in subjects with RA is in progress.
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The burden of influenza hospitalizations in infants from 2003 to 2012, United States.
Pediatr. Infect. Dis. J.
PUBLISHED: 03-01-2014
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Little information is available describing the epidemiology and clinical characteristics of those <12 months hospitalized with influenza, particularly at a population level.
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Administration of supplemental L-tyrosine with phenelzine: a clinical literature review.
Clin Pharmacol
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2014
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The subject of this literature review is the alleged relationship between L-tyrosine, phenelzine, and hypertensive crisis. Phenelzine (Nardil(®)) prescribing information notes: "The potentiation of sympathomimetic substances and related compounds by MAO inhibitors may result in hypertensive crises (see WARNINGS). Therefore, patients being treated with NARDIL should not take […] L-tyrosine […]". Interest in the scientific foundation of this claim was generated during routine patient care. A comprehensive literature search of Google Scholar and PubMed revealed no reported cases of hypertensive crisis associated with concomitant administration of L-tyrosine and phenelzine. Review of current US Food and Drug Administration nutritional guidelines relating to ongoing phenelzine studies reveals no mention and requires no consideration of L-tyrosine ingestion in combination with phenelzine. This paper is intended to provide an objective review of the science to then allow the reader to formulate the final opinion.
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Reduction in upper-extremity tone after lumbar selective dorsal rhizotomy in children with spastic cerebral palsy.
J Neurosurg Pediatr
PUBLISHED: 10-11-2013
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Object Randomized clinical trials have established that lumbar selective dorsal rhizotomy (SDR) reduces lower-extremity tone and improves functional outcome in children with spastic cerebral palsy. Significant data exist to support a secondary effect on upper-extremity function in patients with upper-extremity spasticity. The effects of SDR on upper-extremity tone, however, are not well characterized. In this report, the authors sought to assess changes in upper-extremity tone in individual muscle groups after SDR and tried to determine if these changes could be predicted preoperatively. Methods The authors retrospectively reviewed 42 children who underwent SDR at Columbia University Medical Center/Morgan Stanley Childrens Hospital of NewYork-Presbyterian between 2005 and 2011. Twenty-five had upper-extremity spasticity. All underwent pre- and postoperative examination for measuring tone (Modified Ashworth Scale) and assessing functional outcome. Follow-up examinations with therapists were performed at least once at a minimum of 2 months postoperatively (mean 15 months). Results In the upper extremities, 23 (92%) of 25 patients had improvements of at least 1 Ashworth point in 2 or more independent motor groups on the Modified Ashworth Scale, and 12 (71%) of 17 families surveyed reported increases in motor control or spontaneous movement. The mean Modified Ashworth Scale scores for all upper-extremity muscle groups demonstrated an improvement from 1.34 to 1.22 (p < 0.001). Patients with a mean preoperative upper-extremity tone of 1.25-1.75 were most likely to benefit from reduction in tone (p = 0.0019). Proximal and pronator muscle groups were most likely to demonstrate reduced tone. Conclusions In addition to improvements in lower-extremity tone and function, SDR has demonstrable effects on upper extremities. Greater than 90% of our patients with elevated upper-extremity tone demonstrated reduction in tone in at least 2 muscle groups postoperatively. Patients with a mean Modified Ashworth Scale upper-extremity score of 1.25-1.75 may encounter the greatest reduction in upper-extremity tone.
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Complications and Associated Bacterial Coinfections Among Children Hospitalized With Seasonal or Pandemic Influenza, United States, 2003-2010.
J. Infect. Dis.
PUBLISHED: 08-28-2013
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Background.?Data on the range and severity of influenza-associated complications among children are limited. We describe the frequency and severity of complications in hospitalized children aged <18 years with seasonal influenza (during 2003-2009) and 2009 pandemic influenza A(H1N1) (during 2009-2010).Methods.?Population-based surveillance for laboratory-confirmed influenza hospitalizations was conducted among 5.3 million children in 10 states. Complications were identified by International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision (ICD-9) codes in medical records.Results.?During 2003-2010, 7293 children hospitalized with influenza were identified, of whom 6769 (93%) had complete ICD-9 code data. Among the 6769 children, the median length of hospitalization was 3 days (interquartile range, 2-4 days), 975 (14%) required intensive care, 359 (5%) had respiratory failure, and 40 (1%) died. The most common complications were pneumonia (in 28% of children), asthma exacerbations (in 22% [793/3616] aged ?2 years), and dehydration (in 21%). Lung abscess/empyema, tracheitis, encephalopathy, bacteremia/sepsis, acute renal failure, and myocarditis were rare (each ?2% of children) but associated with a median hospitalization duration of ?6 days, and 48%-70% of children required intensive care. Bacterial cultures with positive results were identified in 2% of children (107/6769); Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pneumoniae were most commonly identified.Conclusions.?Complications contribute substantially to the disease burden among children hospitalized with influenza, through intensive care requirements and prolonged hospitalization, highlighting the importance of primary prevention with influenza vaccination.
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Patients hospitalized with laboratory-confirmed influenza during the 2010-2011 influenza season: exploring disease severity by virus type and subtype.
J. Infect. Dis.
PUBLISHED: 07-17-2013
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?The 2010-2011 influenza season was dominated by influenza A(H3N2) virus, but influenza A(H1N1) pdm09 (pH1N1) and B viruses cocirculated. This provided an opportunity to explore within-season predictors of severity among hospitalized patients, avoiding biases associated with season-to-season differences in strain virulence, population immunity, and healthcare seeking.
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Hospital-onset influenza hospitalizations-United States, 2010-2011.
Am J Infect Control
PUBLISHED: 05-07-2013
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Seasonal influenza is responsible for more than 200,000 hospitalizations each year in the United States. Although hospital-onset (HO) influenza contributes to morbidity and mortality among these patients, little is known about its overall epidemiology.
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Preclinical safety evaluation of human platelets treated with antimicrobial peptides in severe combined immunodeficient mice.
Transfusion
PUBLISHED: 03-20-2013
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Bacterial sepsis is a complication attributed to room temperature (RT)-stored platelets (PLTs) in transfusion medicine. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are emerging as new therapeutic agents against microbes. We had previously demonstrated bactericidal activity of select synthetic AMPs against six types of bacteria in stored PLTs. In this report, we tested these AMPs for their potential antibody response and interference with the recovery and survival of human PLTs in an animal model.
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Proteasome inhibitors in the treatment of multiple myeloma.
Expert Rev Anticancer Ther
PUBLISHED: 03-13-2013
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Proteasome inhibition has been shown to be an effective strategy for the treatment of multiple myeloma, as demonstrated by the clinical activity of the first-in-class agent bortezomib. Recently, the second-generation proteasome inhibitor carfilzomib has been approved in the USA in the relapsed and refractory setting, and several other investigational agents are in clinical development, including MLN9708, marizomib, oprozomib and delanzomib. Here, the authors provide a comprehensive review of the key role of proteasome inhibitors in the myeloma treatment pathway, and highlight the similarities and differences in pharmacology, routes of administration, and efficacy and safety profiles between bortezomib, carfilzomib and investigational agents. The authors also evaluate the potential for further improving myeloma treatment through the ongoing development of novel proteasome inhibitors.
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Use of a bacteriophage lysin to identify a novel target for antimicrobial development.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2013
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We identified an essential cell wall biosynthetic enzyme in Bacillus anthracis and an inhibitor thereof to which the organism did not spontaneously evolve measurable resistance. This work is based on the exquisite binding specificity of bacteriophage-encoded cell wall-hydrolytic lysins, which have evolved to recognize critical receptors within the bacterial cell wall. Focusing on the B. anthracis-specific PlyG lysin, we first identified its unique cell wall receptor and cognate biosynthetic pathway. Within this pathway, one biosynthetic enzyme, 2-epimerase, was required for both PlyG receptor expression and bacterial growth. The 2-epimerase was used to design a small-molecule inhibitor, epimerox. Epimerox prevented growth of several Gram-positive pathogens and rescued mice challenged with lethal doses of B. anthracis. Importantly, resistance to epimerox was not detected (<10(-11) frequency) in B. anthracis and S. aureus. These results describe the use of phage lysins to identify promising lead molecules with reduced resistance potential for antimicrobial development.
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Spinal muscular atrophy type III: trying to understand subtle functional change over time--a case report.
J. Child Neurol.
PUBLISHED: 12-07-2011
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Spinal muscular atrophy is a relatively stable chronic disease. Patients may gradually experience declines in muscle strength and motor function over time. However, functional progression is difficult to document, and the mechanism remains poorly understood. An 11-year-old girl was diagnosed at 19 months and took a few steps without assistance at 25 months. She was evaluated for 54 months in a prospective multicenter natural history study. Outcome measures were performed serially. From 6 to 7.5 years, motor function improved. From 7.5 to 11 years, motor function declined with increasing growth. Manual muscle testing scores minimally decreased. Motor unit number estimation studies gradually increased over 4.5 years. Compared to the published natural history of spinal muscular atrophy type III, our patient lost motor function over time. However, she walked with assistance 2 years longer than expected. Our report highlights possible precipitating factors that could affect the natural history of spinal muscular atrophy type III.
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Description of antiviral treatment among adults hospitalized with influenza before and during the 2009 pandemic: United States, 2005-2009.
J. Infect. Dis.
PUBLISHED: 10-19-2011
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The 2009 influenza pandemic led to guidelines emphasizing antiviral treatment for all persons hospitalized with influenza, including pregnant women. We compared antiviral use among adults hospitalized with influenza before and during the pandemic.
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Interdisciplinary rehabilitation of mild TBI and PTSD: a case report.
Brain Inj
PUBLISHED: 08-05-2011
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Prevalence of mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) or concussion on the battlefield in Iraq/Afghanistan has resulted in its designation as a signature injury. Civilian studies have shown that negative expectations for recovery may lead to worse outcomes. While there is concern that concussion screening procedures in the Veterans Affairs Healthcare System and the Department of Defence could fuel negative expectations, leading to negative iatrogenic effects, it has been difficult to document this in clinical settings. The aim of this report is to describe the case of a veteran with comorbid mTBI/PTSD with persistent symptoms of unknown aetiology and the effects of provider communications on the patients recovery.
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Children with asthma hospitalized with seasonal or pandemic influenza, 2003-2009.
Pediatrics
PUBLISHED: 06-06-2011
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To describe the characteristics and clinical courses of asthmatic children hospitalized with seasonal or 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza and compare complications by influenza type.
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Blood cell microRNAs: what are they and what future do they hold?
Transfus Med Rev
PUBLISHED: 03-17-2011
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The advent of blood component storage revolutionized health care by allowing for a managed supply of transfusion quality blood products. During storage, blood components undergo a series of physiological changes that affect the product quality, which ultimately can interfere with the safety and efficacy of such products after transfusion. Despite continuous improvements in blood component quality and safety, it is still desirable to have in vitro standard markers of measurable characteristics that predict blood component safety and efficacy in vivo following their transfusion. Over the last decade, research on the feasibility of using microRNAs as biomarkers for various clinical manifestations and cellular pathologies has exploded. Here, we review the literature on blood cell microRNAs and discuss the potential of these molecules to act as measurable characteristics (product biomarkers) for stored blood component quality and safety.
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Seasonal and 2009 pandemic influenza A (H1N1) virus infection during pregnancy: a population-based study of hospitalized cases.
Am. J. Obstet. Gynecol.
PUBLISHED: 02-04-2011
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We sought to describe characteristics of hospitalized reproductive-aged (15-44 years) women with seasonal (2005/2006 through 2008/2009) and 2009 pandemic influenza A (H1N1) virus infection. We used population-based data from the Emerging Infections Program in 10 US states, and compared characteristics of pregnant (n = 150) and nonpregnant (n = 489) seasonal, and pregnant (n = 489) and nonpregnant (n = 1088) pandemic influenza cases using ?(2) and Fishers exact tests. Pregnant women represented 23.5% and 31.0% of all reproductive-aged women hospitalized for seasonal and pandemic influenza, respectively. Significantly more nonpregnant than pregnant women with seasonal (71.2% vs 36.0%) and pandemic (69.7% vs 31.9%) influenza had an underlying medical condition other than pregnancy. Antiviral treatment was significantly more common with pandemic than seasonal influenza for both pregnant (86.5% vs 24.0%) and nonpregnant (82.0% vs 55.2%) women. Pregnant women comprised a significant proportion of influenza-hospitalized reproductive-aged women, underscoring the importance of influenza vaccination during pregnancy.
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Obesity in children with Down syndrome: background and recommendations for management.
Pediatr Nurs
PUBLISHED: 11-24-2010
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Children with Down syndrome have a higher risk for developing obesity. The primary care provider can assist the family in preventing or managing obesity by recognizing the physiological and behavioral factors that place children and adolescents with Down syndrome at increased risk to become obese, and establishing a screening and management plan early to prevent or treat excess weight gain. By using adapted strategies, the negative physiological and psychological outcomes associated with obesity may be lessened or avoided in this specific population.
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Cognitive rehabilitation in traumatic brain injury.
Curr Treat Options Neurol
PUBLISHED: 09-16-2010
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Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major public health problem with neurobehavioral sequelae contributing to the long-term disability that is often associated with the moderate to severe levels of injury. Rehabilitation of cognitive skills is central to encouraging the full participation of the individual in home, vocational, and social roles. The review of available evidence points to four major recommendations for the rehabilitation of cognition following brain injury: 1) Access to subacute rehabilitation that is holistic in nature and involves a multidisciplinary or transdisciplinary team to work in an integrated fashion to support physical, cognitive, and social skill retraining is vital to support positive outcome following TBI. The collaborative effort of these individuals allows for continual reinforcement and evaluation of treatment goals and will often involve the family and/or important others in the individuals life to prepare for community re-entry. 2) Trials of medication, especially methylphenidate, to assist individuals with significant attention and memory impairment appear well supported by the available evidence. Though some data suggest that the use of cholinesterase inhibitors may be of use for individuals with memory impairments, there is less support for this practice and there are indications that it may worsen the behavioral sequelae of the injury. 3) Randomized controlled trials demonstrate the utility of specific rehabilitation approaches to attention retraining and retraining of executive functioning skills. Future research is needed on rehabilitation techniques in other domains of cognition. 4) Training in the use of supportive devices (either a memory book or more technologically enhanced compensatory devices) to support the individuals daily activities remains central to the independent function of the individual in the community. Though emerging treatments (eg, virtual reality environments) show relative degrees of promise for inclusion in the rehabilitation of the individual with TBI, these need further evaluation in systematic trials.
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Nasal turbinate enlargement due to cartilage and bone proliferation: a normal developmental finding in young ferrets.
Toxicol Pathol
PUBLISHED: 09-13-2010
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Toxicity studies of intranasally administered, live attenuated influenza virus vaccine candidates conducted in male and female ferrets led to the microscopic observation of individual differences in the size of nasal turbinates, especially in the dorsal aspect of the nasal cavity. The association of these enlarged turbinates with acute to subacute inflammation, which is sometimes common in ferrets given live attenuated influenza virus vaccine candidates, led to this detailed microscopic evaluation of turbinate enlargement (cartilaginous and osseous thickening, or COT) in control animals dosed intranasally with saline. Results of this evaluation led to the conclusion that COT is a normal developmental feature of growing ferrets, irrespective of inflammation in nasal tissues or inflammatory exudate in the nasal cavity.
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Adult hospitalizations for laboratory-positive influenza during the 2005-2006 through 2007-2008 seasons in the United States.
J. Infect. Dis.
PUBLISHED: 08-04-2010
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Rates of influenza-associated hospitalizations in the United States have been estimated using modeling techniques with data from pneumonia and influenza hospitalization discharge diagnoses, but they have not been directly estimated from laboratory-positive cases.
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Influenza-associated pneumonia in children hospitalized with laboratory-confirmed influenza, 2003-2008.
Pediatr. Infect. Dis. J.
PUBLISHED: 07-01-2010
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Pneumonia is one of the most common complications in children hospitalized with influenza. We describe hospitalized children with influenza-associated pneumonia and associated risk indicators.
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Burden of seasonal influenza hospitalization in children, United States, 2003 to 2008.
J. Pediatr.
PUBLISHED: 03-22-2010
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To estimate the rates of hospitalization with seasonal influenza in children aged <18 years from a large, diverse surveillance area during 2003 to 2008.
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Risk factors for sporadic shigellosis, FoodNet 2005.
Foodborne Pathog. Dis.
PUBLISHED: 02-02-2010
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An estimated 450,000 cases of shigellosis occur annually in the United States. Outbreaks have been associated with food, water, child daycare centers, and men who have sex with men. However, for sporadic infections, which account for the majority of cases, risk exposures are poorly characterized.
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Developmental status of children of teen mothers: contrasting objective assessments with maternal reports.
J Pediatr Health Care
PUBLISHED: 09-02-2009
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Descriptive study compared adolescent mothers subjective perceptions of their childrens development with objective developmental assessments.
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Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder in children and adolescents: closing diagnostic, communication, and treatment gaps.
J Pediatr Health Care
PUBLISHED: 07-30-2009
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Nurses and nurse practitioners often play a key role in the management of children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), a disorder that often persists into adolescence and adulthood. The diagnosis of ADHD requires careful history taking, use of standardized rating scales, and close attention to the patients behavior and informants reports. Stimulants appear to be most effective for patients with this diagnosis, but pharmacotherapy for ADHD should be combined with educational and behavioral interventions and careful follow-up to optimize treatment outcomes. Nurses and nurse practitioners must advocate to assist patients and families achieve goals at home and at school.
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Comparison of assessment measures for post-stroke depression.
Clin Neuropsychol
PUBLISHED: 03-13-2009
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Depression is commonplace following stroke and is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. The objective of this study is to examine the sensitivity and specificity of four standardized measures for assessing depression in a stroke population. A total of 67 adults admitted to an inpatient rehabilitation unit with acute stroke were assessed with four standardized depression measures and by structured clinical interview as part of a cross-sectional study assessing cognitive and emotional functioning. Using DSM-IV criteria, major depression was present in 15% of the sample and minor depression in an additional 28%. The four depression measures yielded rates of depression ranging from 14% to 46% when their recommended clinical threshold scores were applied. The Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D) had the greatest positive predictive value (PPV) at 28%. Cutoff scores were adjusted using receiver operating curve (ROC) analyses, and PPV ranged from 28% to 34% when using lower cutoff scores, representing an improvement for all measures. Common assessment measures yield significantly different classification rates for depression in persons with acute stroke. Traditional threshold scores for commonly used objective depression measures may not be optimally sensitive for detection of depression in stroke populations. Based on the findings of this study we recommend clinicians use the Geriatric Depression Scale-Short Form using a cutoff score of 3 or greater. Clinical and research implications are offered.
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Seasonal influenza morbidity estimates obtained from telephone surveys, 2007.
Am J Public Health
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We assessed telephone surveys as a novel surveillance method, comparing data obtained by telephone with existing national influenza surveillance systems, and evaluated the utility of telephone surveys.
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Increase in rates of hospitalization due to laboratory-confirmed influenza among children and adults during the 2009-10 influenza pandemic.
J. Infect. Dis.
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The Emerging Infections Programs (EIP) network has conducted population-based surveillance for hospitalizations due to laboratory-confirmed influenza among children since 2003, with the network expanding in 2005 to include adults.
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Reduced influenza antiviral treatment among children and adults hospitalized with laboratory-confirmed influenza infection in the year after the 2009 pandemic.
Clin. Infect. Dis.
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Influenza antiviral treatment is recommended for all persons hospitalized with influenza virus infection. During the 2010-2011 influenza season, antiviral treatment of children and adults hospitalized with laboratory-confirmed influenza declined significantly compared with treatment during the 2009 pandemic (children, 56% vs 77%; adults, 77% vs 82%; both P < .01).
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The potential influence of a social media intervention on risky sexual behavior and Chlamydia incidence.
J Community Health Nurs
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The purpose of this descriptive pilot study was to evaluate an evidence-based social-networking intervention aimed at reducing the incidence of Chlamydia among 15- to 24-year-olds. The intervention consists of a Facebook site that addresses signs, symptoms, treatment, screening, and prevention of Chlamydia infection. Findings included a 23% self-reported increase in condom utilization, and a 54% reduction in positive Chlamydia cases among 15- to 17-year-olds. Study results support that social media may be an effective mechanism for information dissemination and the promotion of positive behavioral changes among this population.
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Influenza-associated hospitalizations by industry, 2009-10 influenza season, United States.
Emerging Infect. Dis.
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In response to pandemic (H1N1) 2009, data were collected on work status and industry of employment of 3,365 adults hospitalized with laboratory-confirmed influenza during the 2009-10 influenza season in the United States. The proportion of workers hospitalized for influenza was lower than their proportion in the general population, reflecting underlying protective characteristics of workers compared with nonworkers. The most commonly represented sectors were transportation and warehousing; administrative and support and waste management and remediation services; health care; and accommodation and food service.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

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We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.