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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
NAMPT Is the Cellular Target of STF-31-Like Small-Molecule Probes.
ACS Chem. Biol.
PUBLISHED: 08-07-2014
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The small-molecule probes STF-31 and its analogue compound 146 were discovered while searching for compounds that kill VHL-deficient renal cell carcinoma cell lines selectively and have been reported to act via direct inhibition of the glucose transporter GLUT1. We profiled the sensitivity of 679 cancer cell lines to STF-31 and found that the pattern of response is tightly correlated with sensitivity to three different inhibitors of nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT). We also performed whole-exome next-generation sequencing of compound 146-resistant HCT116 clones and identified a recurrent NAMPT-H191R mutation. Ectopic expression of NAMPT-H191R conferred resistance to both STF-31 and compound 146 in cell lines. We further demonstrated that both STF-31 and compound 146 inhibit the enzymatic activity of NAMPT in a biochemical assay in vitro. Together, our cancer-cell profiling and genomic approaches identify NAMPT inhibition as a critical mechanism by which STF-31-like compounds inhibit cancer cells.
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Toward performance-diverse small-molecule libraries for cell-based phenotypic screening using multiplexed high-dimensional profiling.
Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A.
PUBLISHED: 07-14-2014
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High-throughput screening has become a mainstay of small-molecule probe and early drug discovery. The question of how to build and evolve efficient screening collections systematically for cell-based and biochemical screening is still unresolved. It is often assumed that chemical structure diversity leads to diverse biological performance of a library. Here, we confirm earlier results showing that this inference is not always valid and suggest instead using biological measurement diversity derived from multiplexed profiling in the construction of libraries with diverse assay performance patterns for cell-based screens. Rather than using results from tens or hundreds of completed assays, which is resource intensive and not easily extensible, we use high-dimensional image-based cell morphology and gene expression profiles. We piloted this approach using over 30,000 compounds. We show that small-molecule profiling can be used to select compound sets with high rates of activity and diverse biological performance.
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Automated Structure-Activity Relationship Mining: Connecting Chemical Structure to Biological Profiles.
J Biomol Screen
PUBLISHED: 04-07-2014
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Understanding the structure-activity relationships (SARs) of small molecules is important for developing probes and novel therapeutic agents in chemical biology and drug discovery. Increasingly, multiplexed small-molecule profiling assays allow simultaneous measurement of many biological response parameters for the same compound (e.g., expression levels for many genes or binding constants against many proteins). Although such methods promise to capture SARs with high granularity, few computational methods are available to support SAR analyses of high-dimensional compound activity profiles. Many of these methods are not generally applicable or reduce the activity space to scalar summary statistics before establishing SARs. In this article, we present a versatile computational method that automatically extracts interpretable SAR rules from high-dimensional profiling data. The rules connect chemical structural features of compounds to patterns in their biological activity profiles. We applied our method to data from novel cell-based gene-expression and imaging assays collected on more than 30,000 small molecules. Based on the rules identified for this data set, we prioritized groups of compounds for further study, including a novel set of putative histone deacetylase inhibitors.
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Connecting Small Molecules with Similar Assay Performance Profiles Leads to New Biological Hypotheses.
J Biomol Screen
PUBLISHED: 01-24-2014
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High-throughput screening allows rapid identification of new candidate compounds for biological probe or drug development. Here, we describe a principled method to generate "assay performance profiles" for individual compounds that can serve as a basis for similarity searches and cluster analyses. Our method overcomes three challenges associated with generating robust assay performance profiles: (1) we transform data, allowing us to build profiles from assays having diverse dynamic ranges and variability; (2) we apply appropriate mathematical principles to handle missing data; and (3) we mitigate the fact that loss-of-signal assay measurements may not distinguish between multiple mechanisms that can lead to certain phenotypes (e.g., cell death). Our method connected compounds with similar mechanisms of action, enabling prediction of new targets and mechanisms both for known bioactives and for compounds emerging from new screens. Furthermore, we used Bayesian modeling of promiscuous compounds to distinguish between broadly bioactive and narrowly bioactive compound communities. Several examples illustrate the utility of our method to support mechanism-of-action studies in probe development and target identification projects.
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Regulation of ferroptotic cancer cell death by GPX4.
Cell
PUBLISHED: 01-21-2014
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Ferroptosis is a form of nonapoptotic cell death for which key regulators remain unknown. We sought a common mediator for the lethality of 12 ferroptosis-inducing small molecules. We used targeted metabolomic profiling to discover that depletion of glutathione causes inactivation of glutathione peroxidases (GPXs) in response to one class of compounds and a chemoproteomics strategy to discover that GPX4 is directly inhibited by a second class of compounds. GPX4 overexpression and knockdown modulated the lethality of 12 ferroptosis inducers, but not of 11 compounds with other lethal mechanisms. In addition, two representative ferroptosis inducers prevented tumor growth in xenograft mouse tumor models. Sensitivity profiling in 177 cancer cell lines revealed that diffuse large B cell lymphomas and renal cell carcinomas are particularly susceptible to GPX4-regulated ferroptosis. Thus, GPX4 is an essential regulator of ferroptotic cancer cell death.
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An Overview of the Challenges in Designing, Integrating, and Delivering BARD: A Public Chemical-Biology Resource and Query Portal for Multiple Organizations, Locations, and Disciplines.
J Biomol Screen
PUBLISHED: 01-17-2014
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Recent industry-academic partnerships involve collaboration among disciplines, locations, and organizations using publicly funded "open-access" and proprietary commercial data sources. These require the effective integration of chemical and biological information from diverse data sources, which presents key informatics, personnel, and organizational challenges. The BioAssay Research Database (BARD) was conceived to address these challenges and serve as a community-wide resource and intuitive web portal for public-sector chemical-biology data. Its initial focus is to enable scientists to more effectively use the National Institutes of Health Roadmap Molecular Libraries Program (MLP) data generated from the 3-year pilot and 6-year production phases of the Molecular Libraries Probe Production Centers Network (MLPCN), which is currently in its final year. BARD evolves the current data standards through structured assay and result annotations that leverage BioAssay Ontology and other industry-standard ontologies, and a core hierarchy of assay definition terms and data standards defined specifically for small-molecule assay data. We initially focused on migrating the highest-value MLP data into BARD and bringing it up to this new standard. We review the technical and organizational challenges overcome by the interdisciplinary BARD team, veterans of public- and private-sector data-integration projects, who are collaborating to describe (functional specifications), design (technical specifications), and implement this next-generation software solution.
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Phenothiazines induce PP2A-mediated apoptosis in T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.
J. Clin. Invest.
PUBLISHED: 01-09-2014
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T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) is an aggressive cancer that is frequently associated with activating mutations in NOTCH1 and dysregulation of MYC. Here, we performed 2 complementary screens to identify FDA-approved drugs and drug-like small molecules with activity against T-ALL. We developed a zebrafish system to screen small molecules for toxic activity toward MYC-overexpressing thymocytes and used a human T-ALL cell line to screen for small molecules that synergize with Notch inhibitors. We identified the antipsychotic drug perphenazine in both screens due to its ability to induce apoptosis in fish, mouse, and human T-ALL cells. Using ligand-affinity chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry, we identified protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) as a perphenazine target. T-ALL cell lines treated with perphenazine exhibited rapid dephosphorylation of multiple PP2A substrates and subsequent apoptosis. Moreover, shRNA knockdown of specific PP2A subunits attenuated perphenazine activity, indicating that PP2A mediates the drug's antileukemic activity. Finally, human T-ALLs treated with perphenazine exhibited suppressed cell growth and dephosphorylation of PP2A targets in vitro and in vivo. Our findings provide a mechanistic explanation for the recurring identification of phenothiazines as a class of drugs with anticancer effects. Furthermore, these data suggest that pharmacologic PP2A activation in T-ALL and other cancers driven by hyperphosphorylated PP2A substrates has therapeutic potential.
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Predicting cancer-specific vulnerability via data-driven detection of synthetic lethality.
Cell
PUBLISHED: 01-05-2014
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Synthetic lethality occurs when the inhibition of two genes is lethal while the inhibition of each single gene is not. It can be harnessed to selectively treat cancer by identifying inactive genes in a given cancer and targeting their synthetic lethal (SL) partners. We present a data-driven computational pipeline for the genome-wide identification of SL interactions in cancer by analyzing large volumes of cancer genomic data. First, we show that the approach successfully captures known SL partners of tumor suppressors and oncogenes. We then validate SL predictions obtained for the tumor suppressor VHL. Next, we construct a genome-wide network of SL interactions in cancer and demonstrate its value in predicting gene essentiality and clinical prognosis. Finally, we identify synthetic lethality arising from gene overactivation and use it to predict drug efficacy. These results form a computational basis for exploiting synthetic lethality to uncover cancer-specific susceptibilities.
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Evolving BioAssay Ontology (BAO): modularization, integration and applications.
J Biomed Semantics
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2014
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The lack of established standards to describe and annotate biological assays and screening outcomes in the domain of drug and chemical probe discovery is a severe limitation to utilize public and proprietary drug screening data to their maximum potential. We have created the BioAssay Ontology (BAO) project (http://bioassayontology.org) to develop common reference metadata terms and definitions required for describing relevant information of low-and high-throughput drug and probe screening assays and results. The main objectives of BAO are to enable effective integration, aggregation, retrieval, and analyses of drug screening data. Since we first released BAO on the BioPortal in 2010 we have considerably expanded and enhanced BAO and we have applied the ontology in several internal and external collaborative projects, for example the BioAssay Research Database (BARD). We describe the evolution of BAO with a design that enables modeling complex assays including profile and panel assays such as those in the Library of Integrated Network-based Cellular Signatures (LINCS). One of the critical questions in evolving BAO is the following: how can we provide a way to efficiently reuse and share among various research projects specific parts of our ontologies without violating the integrity of the ontology and without creating redundancies. This paper provides a comprehensive answer to this question with a description of a methodology for ontology modularization using a layered architecture. Our modularization approach defines several distinct BAO components and separates internal from external modules and domain-level from structural components. This approach facilitates the generation/extraction of derived ontologies (or perspectives) that can suit particular use cases or software applications. We describe the evolution of BAO related to its formal structures, engineering approaches, and content to enable modeling of complex assays and integration with other ontologies and datasets.
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Quantitative-proteomic comparison of alpha and Beta cells to uncover novel targets for lineage reprogramming.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2014
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Type-1 diabetes (T1D) is an autoimmune disease in which insulin-secreting pancreatic beta cells are destroyed by the immune system. An emerging strategy to regenerate beta-cell mass is through transdifferentiation of pancreatic alpha cells to beta cells. We previously reported two small molecules, BRD7389 and GW8510, that induce insulin expression in a mouse alpha cell line and provide a glimpse into potential intermediate cell states in beta-cell reprogramming from alpha cells. These small-molecule studies suggested that inhibition of kinases in particular may induce the expression of several beta-cell markers in alpha cells. To identify potential lineage reprogramming protein targets, we compared the transcriptome, proteome, and phosphoproteome of alpha cells, beta cells, and compound-treated alpha cells. Our phosphoproteomic analysis indicated that two kinases, BRSK1 and CAMKK2, exhibit decreased phosphorylation in beta cells compared to alpha cells, and in compound-treated alpha cells compared to DMSO-treated alpha cells. Knock-down of these kinases in alpha cells resulted in expression of key beta-cell markers. These results provide evidence that perturbation of the kinome may be important for lineage reprogramming of alpha cells to beta cells.
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Comparison of methods for image-based profiling of cellular morphological responses to small-molecule treatment.
J Biomol Screen
PUBLISHED: 09-17-2013
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Quantitative microscopy has proven a versatile and powerful phenotypic screening technique. Recently, image-based profiling has shown promise as a means for broadly characterizing molecules effects on cells in several drug-discovery applications, including target-agnostic screening and predicting a compounds mechanism of action (MOA). Several profiling methods have been proposed, but little is known about their comparative performance, impeding the wider adoption and further development of image-based profiling. We compared these methods by applying them to a widely applicable assay of cultured cells and measuring the ability of each method to predict the MOA of a compendium of drugs. A very simple method that is based on population means performed as well as methods designed to take advantage of the measurements of individual cells. This is surprising because many treatments induced a heterogeneous phenotypic response across the cell population in each sample. Another simple method, which performs factor analysis on the cellular measurements before averaging them, provided substantial improvement and was able to predict MOA correctly for 94% of the treatments in our ground-truth set. To facilitate the ready application and future development of image-based phenotypic profiling methods, we provide our complete ground-truth and test data sets, as well as open-source implementations of the various methods in a common software framework.
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An interactive resource to identify cancer genetic and lineage dependencies targeted by small molecules.
Cell
PUBLISHED: 06-21-2013
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The high rate of clinical response to protein-kinase-targeting drugs matched to cancer patients with specific genomic alterations has prompted efforts to use cancer cell line (CCL) profiling to identify additional biomarkers of small-molecule sensitivities. We have quantitatively measured the sensitivity of 242 genomically characterized CCLs to an Informer Set of 354 small molecules that target many nodes in cell circuitry, uncovering protein dependencies that: (1) associate with specific cancer-genomic alterations and (2) can be targeted by small molecules. We have created the Cancer Therapeutics Response Portal (http://www.broadinstitute.org/ctrp) to enable users to correlate genetic features to sensitivity in individual lineages and control for confounding factors of CCL profiling. We report a candidate dependency, associating activating mutations in the oncogene ?-catenin with sensitivity to the Bcl-2 family antagonist, navitoclax. The resource can be used to develop novel therapeutic hypotheses and to accelerate discovery of drugs matched to patients by their cancer genotype and lineage.
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Human genetics in rheumatoid arthritis guides a high-throughput drug screen of the CD40 signaling pathway.
PLoS Genet.
PUBLISHED: 05-01-2013
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Although genetic and non-genetic studies in mouse and human implicate the CD40 pathway in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), there are no approved drugs that inhibit CD40 signaling for clinical care in RA or any other disease. Here, we sought to understand the biological consequences of a CD40 risk variant in RA discovered by a previous genome-wide association study (GWAS) and to perform a high-throughput drug screen for modulators of CD40 signaling based on human genetic findings. First, we fine-map the CD40 risk locus in 7,222 seropositive RA patients and 15,870 controls, together with deep sequencing of CD40 coding exons in 500 RA cases and 650 controls, to identify a single SNP that explains the entire signal of association (rs4810485, P?=?1.4×10(-9)). Second, we demonstrate that subjects homozygous for the RA risk allele have ?33% more CD40 on the surface of primary human CD19+ B lymphocytes than subjects homozygous for the non-risk allele (P?=?10(-9)), a finding corroborated by expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) analysis in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 1,469 healthy control individuals. Third, we use retroviral shRNA infection to perturb the amount of CD40 on the surface of a human B lymphocyte cell line (BL2) and observe a direct correlation between amount of CD40 protein and phosphorylation of RelA (p65), a subunit of the NF-?B transcription factor. Finally, we develop a high-throughput NF-?B luciferase reporter assay in BL2 cells activated with trimerized CD40 ligand (tCD40L) and conduct an HTS of 1,982 chemical compounds and FDA-approved drugs. After a series of counter-screens and testing in primary human CD19+ B cells, we identify 2 novel chemical inhibitors not previously implicated in inflammation or CD40-mediated NF-?B signaling. Our study demonstrates proof-of-concept that human genetics can be used to guide the development of phenotype-based, high-throughput small-molecule screens to identify potential novel therapies in complex traits such as RA.
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Niche-based screening identifies small-molecule inhibitors of leukemia stem cells.
Nat. Chem. Biol.
PUBLISHED: 03-13-2013
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Efforts to develop more effective therapies for acute leukemia may benefit from high-throughput screening systems that reflect the complex physiology of the disease, including leukemia stem cells (LSCs) and supportive interactions with the bone marrow microenvironment. The therapeutic targeting of LSCs is challenging because LSCs are highly similar to normal hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) and are protected by stromal cells in vivo. We screened 14,718 compounds in a leukemia-stroma co-culture system for inhibition of cobblestone formation, a cellular behavior associated with stem-cell function. Among those compounds that inhibited malignant cells but spared HSPCs was the cholesterol-lowering drug lovastatin. Lovastatin showed anti-LSC activity in vitro and in an in vivo bone marrow transplantation model. Mechanistic studies demonstrated that the effect was on target, via inhibition of HMG-CoA reductase. These results illustrate the power of merging physiologically relevant models with high-throughput screening.
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Target identification and mechanism of action in chemical biology and drug discovery.
Nat. Chem. Biol.
PUBLISHED: 01-28-2013
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Target-identification and mechanism-of-action studies have important roles in small-molecule probe and drug discovery. Biological and technological advances have resulted in the increasing use of cell-based assays to discover new biologically active small molecules. Such studies allow small-molecule action to be tested in a more disease-relevant setting at the outset, but they require follow-up studies to determine the precise protein target or targets responsible for the observed phenotype. Target identification can be approached by direct biochemical methods, genetic interactions or computational inference. In many cases, however, combinations of approaches may be required to fully characterize on-target and off-target effects and to understand mechanisms of small-molecule action.
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An informatic pipeline for managing high-throughput screening experiments and analyzing data from stereochemically diverse libraries.
J. Comput. Aided Mol. Des.
PUBLISHED: 01-21-2013
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Integration of flexible data-analysis tools with cheminformatics methods is a prerequisite for successful identification and validation of "hits" in high-throughput screening (HTS) campaigns. We have designed, developed, and implemented a suite of robust yet flexible cheminformatics tools to support HTS activities at the Broad Institute, three of which are described herein. The "hit-calling" tool allows a researcher to set a hit threshold that can be varied during downstream analysis. The results from the hit-calling exercise are reported to a database for record keeping and further data analysis. The "cherry-picking" tool enables creation of an optimized list of hits for confirmatory and follow-up assays from an HTS hit list. This tool allows filtering by computed chemical property and by substructure. In addition, similarity searches can be performed on hits of interest and sets of related compounds can be selected. The third tool, an "S/SAR viewer," has been designed specifically for the Broad Institutes diversity-oriented synthesis (DOS) collection. The compounds in this collection are rich in chiral centers and the full complement of all possible stereoisomers of a given compound are present in the collection. The S/SAR viewer allows rapid identification of both structure/activity relationships and stereo-structure/activity relationships present in HTS data from the DOS collection. Together, these tools enable the prioritization and analysis of hits from diverse compound collections, and enable informed decisions for follow-up biology and chemistry efforts.
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Multiplex cytological profiling assay to measure diverse cellular States.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2013
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Computational methods for image-based profiling are under active development, but their success hinges on assays that can capture a wide range of phenotypes. We have developed a multiplex cytological profiling assay that "paints the cell" with as many fluorescent markers as possible without compromising our ability to extract rich, quantitative profiles in high throughput. The assay detects seven major cellular components. In a pilot screen of bioactive compounds, the assay detected a range of cellular phenotypes and it clustered compounds with similar  annotated protein targets or chemical structure based on cytological profiles. The results demonstrate that the assay captures subtle patterns in the combination of morphological labels, thereby detecting the effects of chemical compounds even though their targets are not stained directly. This image-based assay provides an unbiased approach to characterize compound- and disease-associated cell states to support future probe discovery.
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Utility-aware screening with clique-oriented prioritization.
J Chem Inf Model
PUBLISHED: 12-20-2011
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Most methods of deciding which hits from a screen to send for confirmatory testing assume that all confirmed actives are equally valuable and aim only to maximize the number of confirmed hits. In contrast, "utility-aware" methods are informed by models of screeners preferences and can increase the rate at which the useful information is discovered. Clique-oriented prioritization (COP) extends a recently proposed economic framework and aims--by changing which hits are sent for confirmatory testing--to maximize the number of scaffolds with at least two confirmed active examples. In both retrospective and prospective experiments, COP enables accurate predictions of the number of clique discoveries in a batch of confirmatory experiments and improves the rate of clique discovery by more than 3-fold. In contrast, other similarity-based methods like ontology-based pattern identification (OPI) and local hit-rate analysis (LHR) reduce the rate of scaffold discovery by about half. The utility-aware algorithm used to implement COP is general enough to implement several other important models of screener preferences.
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A human islet cell culture system for high-throughput screening.
J Biomol Screen
PUBLISHED: 12-07-2011
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A small-molecule inducer of beta-cell proliferation in human islets represents a potential regeneration strategy for treating type 1 diabetes. However, the lack of suitable human beta cell lines makes such a discovery a challenge. Here, we adapted an islet cell culture system to high-throughput screening to identify such small molecules. We prepared microtiter plates containing extracellular matrix from a human bladder carcinoma cell line. Dissociated human islets were seeded onto these plates, cultured for up to 7 days, and assessed for proliferation by simultaneous Ki67 and C-peptide immunofluorescence. Importantly, this environment preserved beta-cell physiological function, as measured by glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Adenoviral overexpression of cdk-6 and cyclin D(1), known inducers of human beta cell proliferation, was used as a positive control in our assay. This induction was inhibited by cotreatment with rapamycin, an immunosuppressant often used in islet transplantation. We then performed a pilot screen of 1280 compounds, observing some phenotypic effects on cells. This high-throughput human islet cell culture method can be used to assess various aspects of beta-cell biology on a relatively large number of compounds.
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A small-molecule screening strategy to identify suppressors of statin myopathy.
ACS Chem. Biol.
PUBLISHED: 07-15-2011
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The reduction of plasma low-density lipoprotein levels by HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors, or statins, has had a revolutionary impact in medicine, but muscle-related side effects remain a dose-limiting toxicity in many patients. We describe a chemical epistasis approach that can be useful in refining the mechanism of statin muscle toxicity, as well as in screening for agents that suppress muscle toxicity while preserving the ability of statins to increase the expression of the low-density lipoprotein receptor. Using this approach, we identified one compound that attenuates the muscle side effects in both cellular and animal models of statin toxicity, likely by influencing Rab prenylation. Our proof-of-concept screen lays the foundation for truly high-throughput screens that could help lead to the development of clinically useful adjuvants that can one day be co-administered with statins.
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Enhancing the rate of scaffold discovery with diversity-oriented prioritization.
Bioinformatics
PUBLISHED: 06-17-2011
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In high-throughput screens (HTS) of small molecules for activity in an in vitro assay, it is common to search for active scaffolds, with at least one example successfully confirmed as an active. The number of active scaffolds better reflects the success of the screen than the number of active molecules. Many existing algorithms for deciding which hits should be sent for confirmatory testing neglect this concern.
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Route to three-dimensional fragments using diversity-oriented synthesis.
Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A.
PUBLISHED: 04-11-2011
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Fragment-based drug discovery (FBDD) has proven to be an effective means of producing high-quality chemical ligands as starting points for drug-discovery pursuits. The increasing number of clinical candidate drugs developed using FBDD approaches is a testament of the efficacy of this approach. The success of fragment-based methods is highly dependent on the identity of the fragment library used for screening. The vast majority of FBDD has centered on the use of sp(2)-rich aromatic compounds. An expanded set of fragments that possess more 3D character would provide access to a larger chemical space of fragments than those currently used. Diversity-oriented synthesis (DOS) aims to efficiently generate a set of molecules diverse in skeletal and stereochemical properties. Molecules derived from DOS have also displayed significant success in the modulation of function of various "difficult" targets. Herein, we describe the application of DOS toward the construction of a unique set of fragments containing highly sp(3)-rich skeletons for fragment-based screening. Using cheminformatic analysis, we quantified the shapes and physical properties of the new 3D fragments and compared them with a database containing known fragment-like molecules.
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Quantifying structure and performance diversity for sets of small molecules comprising small-molecule screening collections.
Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A.
PUBLISHED: 04-11-2011
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Using a diverse collection of small molecules we recently found that compound sets from different sources (commercial; academic; natural) have different protein-binding behaviors, and these behaviors correlate with trends in stereochemical complexity for these compound sets. These results lend insight into structural features that synthetic chemists might target when synthesizing screening collections for biological discovery. We report extensive characterization of structural properties and diversity of biological performance for these compounds and expand comparative analyses to include physicochemical properties and three-dimensional shapes of predicted conformers. The results highlight additional similarities and differences between the sets, but also the dependence of such comparisons on the choice of molecular descriptors. Using a protein-binding dataset, we introduce an information-theoretic measure to assess diversity of performance with a constraint on specificity. Rather than relying on finding individual active compounds, this measure allows rational judgment of compound subsets as groups. We also apply this measure to publicly available data from ChemBank for the same compound sets across a diverse group of functional assays. We find that performance diversity of compound sets is relatively stable across a range of property values as judged by this measure, both in protein-binding studies and functional assays. Because building screening collections with improved performance depends on efficient use of synthetic organic chemistry resources, these studies illustrate an important quantitative framework to help prioritize choices made in building such collections.
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Master data management: getting your house in order.
Comb. Chem. High Throughput Screen.
PUBLISHED: 03-15-2011
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The availability of high-throughput techniques combined with more exploratory and confirmatory studies in small-molecule science (e.g., probe- and drug-discovery) creates a significant need for structured approaches to data management. The probe- and drug-discovery scientific processes start and end with lower-throughput experiments, connected often by high-throughput cheminformatics, screening, and small-molecule profiling experiments. A rigorous and disciplined approach to data management ensures that data can be used to ask complex questions of assay results, and allows many questions to be answered computationally, without the need for significant manual effort. A structured approach to recording scientific experimental design and observations involves using a consistently maintained set of master data or metadata. Master data include sets of tightly controlled terminology used to describe an experiment, including both materials and methods. Master data can be used at the level of an individual laboratory or with a scope as extensive as a whole community of scientists. Consistent use of master data increases experimental power by allowing data analysis to connect all parts of the discovery life cycle, across experiments performed by different researchers and from different laboratories, thus decreasing the opportunity cost for making novel connections between results. Despite the promise of this increased experimental power, challenges remain in implementation and consistent use of master data management (MDM) techniques in the laboratory. In this paper, we discuss how specific MDM techniques can enhance the quality and utility of scientific data at a project, laboratory, and institutional level. We present a model for storage and exploitation of master data, practical applications of these techniques in the research context of small-molecule science, and specific benefits of MDM to small-molecule screening aimed at probe- and drug-discovery.
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Assay of the multiple energy-producing pathways of mammalian cells.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 02-27-2011
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To elucidate metabolic changes that occur in diabetes, obesity, and cancer, it is important to understand cellular energy metabolism pathways and their alterations in various cells.
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Disease allele-dependent small-molecule sensitivities in blood cells from monogenic diabetes.
Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A.
PUBLISHED: 12-23-2010
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Even as genetic studies identify alleles that influence human disease susceptibility, it remains challenging to understand their functional significance and how they contribute to disease phenotypes. Here, we describe an approach to translate discoveries from human genetics into functional and therapeutic hypotheses by relating human genetic variation to small-molecule sensitivities. We use small-molecule probes modulating a breadth of targets and processes to reveal disease allele-dependent sensitivities, using cells from multiple individuals with an extreme form of diabetes (maturity onset diabetes of the young type 1, caused by mutation in the orphan nuclear receptor HNF4?). This approach enabled the discovery of small molecules that show mechanistically revealing and therapeutically relevant interactions with HNF4? in both lymphoblasts and pancreatic ?-cells, including compounds that physically interact with HNF4?. Compounds including US Food and Drug Administration-approved drugs were identified that favorably modulate a critical disease phenotype, insulin secretion from ?-cells. This method may suggest therapeutic hypotheses for other nonblood disorders.
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Expanding stereochemical and skeletal diversity using petasis reactions and 1,3-dipolar cycloadditions.
Org. Lett.
PUBLISHED: 10-26-2010
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A short and modular synthetic pathway using intramolecular 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reactions and yielding functionalized isoxazoles, isoxazolines, and isoxazolidines is described. The change in shape of previous compounds and those in this study is quantified and compared using principal moment-of-inertia shape analysis.
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Small molecules of different origins have distinct distributions of structural complexity that correlate with protein-binding profiles.
Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A.
PUBLISHED: 10-18-2010
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Using a diverse collection of small molecules generated from a variety of sources, we measured protein-binding activities of each individual compound against each of 100 diverse (sequence-unrelated) proteins using small-molecule microarrays. We also analyzed structural features, including complexity, of the small molecules. We found that compounds from different sources (commercial, academic, natural) have different protein-binding behaviors and that these behaviors correlate with general trends in stereochemical and shape descriptors for these compound collections. Increasing the content of sp(3)-hybridized and stereogenic atoms relative to compounds from commercial sources, which comprise the majority of current screening collections, improved binding selectivity and frequency. The results suggest structural features that synthetic chemists can target when synthesizing screening collections for biological discovery. Because binding proteins selectively can be a key feature of high-value probes and drugs, synthesizing compounds having features identified in this study may result in improved performance of screening collections.
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Small-molecule inducers of insulin expression in pancreatic alpha-cells.
Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A.
PUBLISHED: 08-09-2010
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High-content screening for small-molecule inducers of insulin expression identified the compound BRD7389, which caused alpha-cells to adopt several morphological and gene expression features of a beta-cell state. Assay-performance profile analysis suggests kinase inhibition as a mechanism of action, and we show that biochemical and cellular inhibition of the RSK kinase family by BRD7389 is likely related to its ability induce a beta-cell-like state. BRD7389 also increases the endocrine cell content and function of donor human pancreatic islets in culture.
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Distinct biological network properties between the targets of natural products and disease genes.
J. Am. Chem. Soc.
PUBLISHED: 06-23-2010
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We show that natural products target proteins with a high number of protein-protein functional interactions (high biological network connectivity) and that these protein targets have higher network connectivity than disease genes. This feature may facilitate disruption of essential biological pathways, resulting in competitor death. This result also suggests that additional sources of small molecules will be required to discover drugs targeting the root causes of human disease in the future.
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Small-Molecule Suppressors of Cytokine-Induced beta-Cell Apoptosis.
ACS Chem. Biol.
PUBLISHED: 06-17-2010
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Pancreatic beta-cell apoptosis is a critical event during the development of type-1 diabetes. The identification of small molecules capable of preventing cytokine-induced apoptosis could lead to avenues for therapeutic intervention. We developed a set of phenotypic cell-based assays designed to identify such small-molecule suppressors. Rat INS-1E cells were simultaneously treated with a cocktail of inflammatory cytokines and a collection of 2,240 diverse small molecules and screened using an assay for cellular ATP levels. Forty-nine top-scoring compounds included glucocorticoids, several pyrazole derivatives, and known inhibitors of glycogen synthase kinase-3beta. Two compounds were able to increase cellular ATP levels, reduce caspase-3 activity and nitrite production, and increase glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in the presence of cytokines. These results indicate that small molecules identified by this screening approach may protect beta cells from autoimmune attack and may be good candidates for therapeutic intervention in early stages of type-1 diabetes.
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An economic framework to prioritize confirmatory tests after a high-throughput screen.
J Biomol Screen
PUBLISHED: 06-14-2010
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How many hits from a high-throughput screen should be sent for confirmatory experiments? Analytical answers to this question are derived from statistics alone and aim to fix, for example, the false discovery rate at a predetermined tolerance. These methods, however, neglect local economic context and consequently lead to irrational experimental strategies. In contrast, the authors argue that this question is essentially economic, not statistical, and is amenable to an economic analysis that admits an optimal solution. This solution, in turn, suggests a novel tool for deciding the number of hits to confirm and the marginal cost of discovery, which meaningfully quantifies the local economic trade-off between true and false positives, yielding an economically optimal experimental strategy. Validated with retrospective simulations and prospective experiments, this strategy identified 157 additional actives that had been erroneously labeled inactive in at least one real-world screening experiment.
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Stereochemical and skeletal diversity arising from amino propargylic alcohols.
Org. Lett.
PUBLISHED: 05-21-2010
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An efficient synthetic pathway to the possible stereoisomers of skeletally diverse heterocyclic small molecules is presented. The change in shape brought about by different intramolecular cyclizations of diastereoisomeric amino propargylic alcohols is quantified using principal moment-of-inertia (PMI) shape analysis.
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Alpha shapes applied to molecular shape characterization exhibit novel properties compared to established shape descriptors.
J Chem Inf Model
PUBLISHED: 09-25-2009
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Despite considerable efforts, description of molecular shape is still largely an unresolved problem. Given the importance of molecular shape in the description of spatial interactions in crystals or ligand-target complexes, this is not a satisfying state. In the current work, we propose a novel application of alpha shapes to the description of the shapes of small molecules. Alpha shapes are parametrized generalizations of the convex hull. For a specific value of alpha, the alpha shape is the geometric dual of the space-filling model of a molecule, with the parameter alpha allowing description of shape in varying degrees of detail. To date, alpha shapes have been used to find macromolecular cavities and to estimate molecular surface areas and volumes. We developed a novel methodology for computing molecular shape characteristics from the alpha shape. In this work, we show that alpha-shape descriptors reveal aspects of molecular shape that are complementary to other shape descriptors and that accord well with chemists intuition about shape. While our implementation of alpha-shape descriptors is not computationally trivial, we suggest that the additional shape characteristics they provide can be used to improve and complement shape-analysis methods in domains such as crystallography and ligand-target interactions. In this communication, we present a unique methodology for computing molecular shape characteristics from the alpha shape. We first describe details of the alpha-shape calculation, an outline of validation experiments performed, and a discussion of the advantages and challenges we found while implementing this approach. The results show that, relative to known shape calculations, this method provides a high degree of shape resolution with even small changes in atomic coordinates.
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Connecting synthetic chemistry decisions to cell and genome biology using small-molecule phenotypic profiling.
Curr Opin Chem Biol
PUBLISHED: 08-14-2009
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Discovering small-molecule modulators for thousands of gene products requires multiple stages of biological testing, specificity evaluation, and chemical optimization. Many cellular profiling methods, including cellular sensitivity, gene expression, and cellular imaging, have emerged as methods to assess the functional consequences of biological perturbations. Cellular profiling methods applied to small-molecule science provide opportunities to use complex phenotypic information to prioritize and optimize small-molecule structures simultaneously against multiple biological endpoints. As throughput increases and cost decreases for such technologies, we see an emerging paradigm of using more information earlier in probe-discovery and drug-discovery efforts. Moreover, increasing access to public datasets makes possible the construction of virtual profiles of small-molecule performance, even when multiplexed measurements were not performed or when multidimensional profiling was not the original intent. We review some key conceptual advances in small-molecule phenotypic profiling, emphasizing connections to other information, such as protein-binding measurements, genetic perturbations, and cell states. We argue that to maximally leverage these measurements in probe-discovery and drug-discovery requires a fundamental connection to synthetic chemistry, allowing the consequences of synthetic decisions to be described in terms of changes in small-molecule profiles. Mining such data in the context of chemical structure and synthesis strategies can inform decisions about chemistry procurement and library development, leading to optimal small-molecule screening collections.
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Using biological performance similarity to inform disaccharide library design.
J. Am. Chem. Soc.
PUBLISHED: 03-21-2009
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Designing better small-molecule discovery libraries requires having methods to assess the consequences of different synthesis decisions on the biological performance of resulting library members. Since we are particularly interested in how stereochemistry affects performance in biological assays, we prepared a disaccharide library containing systematic stereochemical variations, assayed the library for different biological effects, and developed methods to assess the similarity of performance between members across multiple assays. These methods allow us to ask which subsets of stereochemical features best predict similarity in patterns of biological performance between individual members and which features produce the greatest variation of outcomes. We anticipate that the data-analysis approach presented here can be generalized to other sets of biological assays and other chemical descriptors. Methods to assess which structural features of library members produce the greatest similarity in performance for a given set of biological assays should help prioritize synthesis decisions in second-generation library development targeting the underlying cell-biological processes. Methods to assess which structural features of library members produce the greatest variation in performance should help guide decisions about what synthetic methods need to be developed to make optimal small-molecule screening collections.
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Unbiased discovery of in vivo imaging probes through in vitro profiling of nanoparticle libraries.
Integr Biol (Camb)
PUBLISHED: 02-09-2009
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In vivo imaging reveals how proteins and cells function as part of complex regulatory networks in intact organisms, and thereby contributes to a systems-level understanding of biological processes. However, the development of novel in vivo imaging probes remains challenging. Most probes are directed against a limited number of pre-specified protein targets; cell-based screens for imaging probes have shown promise, but raise concerns over whether in vitro surrogate cell models recapitulate in vivo phenotypes. Here, we rapidly profile the in vitro binding of nanoparticle imaging probes in multiple samples of defined target vs. background cell types, using primary cell isolates. This approach selects for nanoparticles that show desired targeting effects across all tested members of a class of cells, and decreases the likelihood that an idiosyncratic cell line will unduly skew screening results. To adjust for multiple hypothesis testing, we use permutation methods to identify nanoparticles that best differentiate between the target and background cell classes. (This approach is conceptually analogous to one used for high-dimensionality datasets of genome-wide gene expression, e.g. to identify gene expression signatures that discriminate subclasses of cancer.) We apply this approach to the identification of nanoparticle imaging probes that bind endothelial cells, and validate our in vitro findings in human arterial samples, and by in vivo intravital microscopy in mice. Overall, this work presents a generalizable approach to the unbiased discovery of in vivo imaging probes, and may guide the further development of novel endothelial imaging probes.
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Identification of regulators of polyploidization presents therapeutic targets for treatment of AMKL.
Cell
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The mechanism by which cells decide to skip mitosis to become polyploid is largely undefined. Here we used a high-content image-based screen to identify small-molecule probes that induce polyploidization of megakaryocytic leukemia cells and serve as perturbagens to help understand this process. Our study implicates five networks of kinases that regulate the switch to polyploidy. Moreover, we find that dimethylfasudil (diMF, H-1152P) selectively increased polyploidization, mature cell-surface marker expression, and apoptosis of malignant megakaryocytes. An integrated target identification approach employing proteomic and shRNA screening revealed that a major target of diMF is Aurora kinase A (AURKA). We further find that MLN8237 (Alisertib), a selective inhibitor of AURKA, induced polyploidization and expression of mature megakaryocyte markers in acute megakaryocytic leukemia (AMKL) blasts and displayed potent anti-AMKL activity in vivo. Our findings provide a rationale to support clinical trials of MLN8237 and other inducers of polyploidization and differentiation in AMKL.
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Chromatin-targeting small molecules cause class-specific transcriptional changes in pancreatic endocrine cells.
Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A.
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Under the instruction of cell-fate-determining, DNA-binding transcription factors, chromatin-modifying enzymes mediate and maintain cell states throughout development in multicellular organisms. Currently, small molecules modulating the activity of several classes of chromatin-modifying enzymes are available, including clinically approved histone deacetylase (HDAC) and DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) inhibitors. We describe the genome-wide expression changes induced by 29 compounds targeting HDACs, DNMTs, histone lysine methyltransferases (HKMTs), and protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs) in pancreatic ?- and ?-cell lines. HDAC inhibitors regulate several hundred transcripts irrespective of the cell type, with distinct clusters of dissimilar activity for hydroxamic acids and orthoamino anilides. In contrast, compounds targeting histone methyltransferases modulate the expression of restricted gene sets in distinct cell types. For example, we find that G9a/GLP methyltransferase inhibitors selectively up-regulate the cholesterol biosynthetic pathway in pancreatic but not liver cells. These data suggest that, despite their conservation across the entire genome and in different cell types, chromatin pathways can be targeted to modulate the expression of selected transcripts.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.