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The 19q12 Bladder Cancer GWAS Signal: Association with Cyclin E Function and Aggressive Disease.
Yi-Ping Fu, Indu Kohaar, Lee E Moore, Petra Lenz, Jonine D Figueroa, Wei Tang, Patricia Porter-Gill, Nilanjan Chatterjee, Alexandra Scott-Johnson, Montserrat Garcia-Closas, Brian Muchmore, Dalsu Baris, Ashley Paquin, Kris Ylaya, Molly Schwenn, Andrea B Apolo, Margaret R Karagas, McAnthony Tarway, Alison Johnson, Adam Mumy, Alan Schned, Liliana Guedez, Michael A Jones, Masatoshi Kida, Gm Monawar Hosain, Nuria Malats, Manolis Kogevinas, Adonina Tardón, Consol Serra, Alfredo Carrato, Reina Garcia-Closas, Josep Lloreta, Xifeng Wu, Mark Purdue, Gerald L Andriole, Robert L Grubb, Amanda Black, Maria T Landi, Neil E Caporaso, Paolo Vineis, Afshan Siddiq, H Bas Bueno-de-Mesquita, Dimitrios Trichopoulos, Börje Ljungberg, Gianluca Severi, Elisabete Weiderpass, Vittorio Krogh, Miren Dorronsoro, Ruth C Travis, Anne Tjønneland, Paul Brennan, Jenny Chang-Claude, Elio Riboli, Jennifer Prescott, Constance Chen, Immaculata De Vivo, Edward Govannucci, David Hunter, Peter Kraft, Sara Lindstrom, Susan M Gapstur, Eric J Jacobs, W Ryan Diver, Demetrius Albanes, Stephanie J Weinstein, Jarmo Virtamo, Charles Kooperberg, Chancellor Hohensee, Rebecca J Rodabough, Victoria K Cortessis, David V Conti, Manuela Gago-Dominguez, Mariana C Stern, Malcolm C Pike, David Van Den Berg, Jian-Min Yuan, Christopher A Haiman, Olivier Cussenot, Géraldine Cancel-Tassin, Morgan Rouprêt, Eva Compérat, Stefano Porru, Angela Carta, Sofia Pavanello, Cecilia Arici, Giuseppe Mastrangelo, H Barton Grossman, Zhaoming Wang, Xiang Deng, Charles C Chung, Amy Hutchinson, Laurie Burdette, William Wheeler, Joseph Fraumeni, Stephen J Chanock, Stephen M Hewitt, Debra T Silverman, Nathaniel Rothman, Ludmila Prokunina-Olsson.
Cancer Res.
PUBLISHED: 10-17-2014
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A genome-wide association study (GWAS) of bladder cancer identified a genetic marker rs8102137 within the 19q12 region as a novel susceptibility variant. This marker is located upstream of the CCNE1 gene, which encodes cyclin E, a cell-cycle protein. We performed genetic fine-mapping analysis of the CCNE1 region using data from two bladder cancer GWAS (5,942 cases and 10,857 controls). We found that the original GWAS marker rs8102137 represents a group of 47 linked SNPs (with r(2) ? 0.7) associated with increased bladder cancer risk. From this group, we selected a functional promoter variant rs7257330, which showed strong allele-specific binding of nuclear proteins in several cell lines. In both GWASs, rs7257330 was associated only with aggressive bladder cancer, with a combined per-allele OR = 1.18 [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.09-1.27, P = 4.67 × 10(-5)] versus OR = 1.01 (95% CI, 0.93-1.10, P = 0.79) for nonaggressive disease, with P = 0.0015 for case-only analysis. Cyclin E protein expression analyzed in 265 bladder tumors was increased in aggressive tumors (P = 0.013) and, independently, with each rs7257330-A risk allele (Ptrend = 0.024). Overexpression of recombinant cyclin E in cell lines caused significant acceleration of cell cycle. In conclusion, we defined the 19q12 signal as the first GWAS signal specific for aggressive bladder cancer. Molecular mechanisms of this genetic association may be related to cyclin E overexpression and alteration of cell cycle in carriers of CCNE1 risk variants. In combination with established bladder cancer risk factors and other somatic and germline genetic markers, the CCNE1 variants could be useful for inclusion into bladder cancer risk prediction models. Cancer Res; 74(20); 5808-18. ©2014 AACR.
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Prediagnostic immunoglobulin E levels and risk of chronic lymphocytic leukemia, other lymphomas and multiple myeloma-results of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition.
Carcinogenesis
PUBLISHED: 09-30-2014
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Previous epidemiological studies suggest an inverse association between allergies, marked by elevated immunoglobulin (Ig) E levels, and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) risk. The evidence, however, is inconsistent and prospective data are sparse. We examined the association between prediagnostic total (low: <20; intermediate: 20-100; high >100 kU/l) and specific IgE (negative: <0.35; positive ?0.35 kU/I) concentrations against inhalant antigens and lymphoma risk in a study nested within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition cohort. A total of 1021 incident cases and matched controls of NHL, multiple myeloma (MM) and Hodgkin lymphoma with a mean follow-up time of 7 years were investigated. Multivariate-adjusted odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated by conditional logistic regression. Specific IgE was not associated with the risk of MM, B-cell NHL and B-cell NHL subtypes. In contrast, total IgE levels were inversely associated with the risk of MM [high level: OR = 0.40 (95% CI = 0.21-0.79)] and B-cell NHL [intermediate level: OR = 0.68 (95% CI = 0.53-0.88); high level: OR = 0.62 (95% CI = 0.44-0.86)], largely on the basis of a strong inverse association with chronic lymphocytic leukemia [CLL; intermediate level: OR = 0.49 (95% CI = 0.30-0.80); high level: OR = 0.13 (95% CI = 0.05-0.35)] risk. The inverse relationship for CLL remained significant for those diagnosed 5 years after baseline. The findings of this large prospective study demonstrated significantly lower prediagnostic total IgE levels among CLL and MM cases compared with matched controls. This corresponds to the clinical immunodeficiency state often observed in CLL patients prior to diagnosis. No support for an inverse association between prediagnostic levels of specific IgE and NHL risk was found.
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Circulating 25-Hydroxyvitamin D3 in Relation to Renal Cell Carcinoma Incidence and Survival in the EPIC Cohort.
Am. J. Epidemiol.
PUBLISHED: 09-08-2014
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Normal renal function is essential for vitamin D metabolism, but it is unclear whether circulating vitamin D is associated with risk of renal cell carcinoma (RCC). We assessed whether 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 (25(OH)D3) was associated with risk of RCC and death after RCC diagnosis in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). EPIC recruited 385,747 participants with blood samples between 1992 and 2000. The current study included 560 RCC cases, 557 individually matched controls, and 553 additional controls. Circulating 25(OH)D3 was assessed by mass spectrometry. Conditional and unconditional logistic regression models were used to calculate odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals. Death after RCC diagnosis was assessed using Cox proportional hazards models and flexible parametric survival models. A doubling of 25(OH)D3 was associated with 28% lower odds of RCC after adjustment for season of and age at blood collection, sex, and country of recruitment (odds ratio = 0.72, 95% confidence interval: 0.60, 0.86; P = 0.0004). This estimate was attenuated somewhat after additional adjustment for smoking status at baseline, circulating cotinine, body mass index (weight (kg)/height (m)(2)), and alcohol intake (odds ratio = 0.82, 95% confidence interval: 0.68, 0.99; P = 0.038). There was also some indication that both low and high 25(OH)D3 levels were associated with higher risk of death from any cause among RCC cases.
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Breast cancer risk in MEN1 - a cancer genetics perspective.
Clin. Endocrinol. (Oxf)
PUBLISHED: 09-03-2014
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The tumour spectrum associated with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) has been known for many years. New data suggest that females with MEN1 may face an additional, hitherto unrecognized, risk of early-onset breast cancer. The menin protein is certainly known to have a role in regulating oestrogen receptor activity; but how robust are the data linking MEN1 to breast cancer? This article examines the published data from the viewpoint of a cancer geneticist and considers whether there really is a justifiable indication for enhanced breast surveillance in women with MEN1.
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Etiologic heterogeneity among non-Hodgkin lymphoma subtypes: the InterLymph Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Subtypes Project.
J. Natl. Cancer Inst. Monographs
PUBLISHED: 09-01-2014
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Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) comprises biologically and clinically heterogeneous subtypes. Previously, study size has limited the ability to compare and contrast the risk factor profiles among these heterogeneous subtypes.
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Identification and characterization of novel associations in the CASP8/ALS2CR12 region on chromosome 2 with breast cancer risk.
Wei-Yu Lin, Nicola J Camp, Maya Ghoussaini, Jonathan Beesley, Kyriaki Michailidou, John L Hopper, Carmel Apicella, Melissa C Southey, Jennifer Stone, Marjanka K Schmidt, Annegien Broeks, Laura J Van't Veer, Emiel J Th Rutgers, Kenneth Muir, Artitaya Lophatananon, Sarah Stewart-Brown, Pornthep Siriwanarangsan, Peter A Fasching, Lothar Haeberle, Arif B Ekici, Matthias W Beckmann, Julian Peto, Isabel Dos-Santos-Silva, Olivia Fletcher, Nichola Johnson, Manjeet K Bolla, Qin Wang, Joe Dennis, Elinor J Sawyer, Timothy Cheng, Ian Tomlinson, Michael J Kerin, Nicola Miller, Frederik Marme, Harald M Surowy, Barbara Burwinkel, Pascal Guénel, Thérèse Truong, Florence Menegaux, Claire Mulot, Stig E Bojesen, Børge G Nordestgaard, Sune F Nielsen, Henrik Flyger, Javier Benitez, M Pilar Zamora, José Ignacio Arias Perez, Primitiva Menéndez, Anna González-Neira, Guillermo Pita, M Rosario Alonso, Nuria Alvarez, Daniel Herrero, Hoda Anton-Culver, Hermann Brenner, Aida Karina Dieffenbach, Volker Arndt, Christa Stegmaier, Alfons Meindl, Peter Lichtner, Rita K Schmutzler, Bertram Müller-Myhsok, Hiltrud Brauch, Thomas Brüning, Yon-Dschun Ko, , Daniel C Tessier, Daniel Vincent, Francois Bacot, Heli Nevanlinna, Kristiina Aittomäki, Carl Blomqvist, Sofia Khan, Keitaro Matsuo, Hidemi Ito, Hiroji Iwata, Akiyo Horio, Natalia V Bogdanova, Natalia N Antonenkova, Thilo Dörk, Annika Lindblom, Sara Margolin, Arto Mannermaa, Vesa Kataja, Veli-Matti Kosma, Jaana M Hartikainen, Anna H Wu, Chiu-Chen Tseng, David Van Den Berg, Daniel O Stram, Patrick Neven, Els Wauters, Hans Wildiers, Diether Lambrechts, Jenny Chang-Claude, Anja Rudolph, Petra Seibold, Dieter Flesch-Janys, Paolo Radice, Paolo Peterlongo, Siranoush Manoukian, Bernardo Bonanni, Fergus J Couch, Xianshu Wang, Celine Vachon, Kristen Purrington, Graham G Giles, Roger L Milne, Catriona McLean, Christopher A Haiman, Brian E Henderson, Fredrick Schumacher, Loic Le Marchand, Jacques Simard, Mark S Goldberg, France Labrèche, Martine Dumont, Soo Hwang Teo, Cheng Har Yip, Norhashimah Hassan, Eranga Nishanthie Vithana, Vessela Kristensen, Wei Zheng, Sandra Deming-Halverson, Martha J Shrubsole, Jirong Long, Robert Winqvist, Katri Pylkäs, Arja Jukkola-Vuorinen, Saila Kauppila, Irene L Andrulis, Julia A Knight, Gord Glendon, Sandrine Tchatchou, Peter Devilee, Robert A E M Tollenaar, Caroline Seynaeve, Christi J van Asperen, Montserrat Garcia-Closas, Jonine Figueroa, Jolanta Lissowska, Louise Brinton, Kamila Czene, Hatef Darabi, Mikael Eriksson, Judith S Brand, Maartje J Hooning, Antoinette Hollestelle, Ans M W van den Ouweland, Agnes Jager, Jingmei Li, Jianjun Liu, Keith Humphreys, Xiao-Ou Shu, Wei Lu, Yu-Tang Gao, Hui Cai, Simon S Cross, Malcolm W R Reed, William Blot, Lisa B Signorello, Qiuyin Cai, Paul D P Pharoah, Barbara Perkins, Mitul Shah, Fiona M Blows, Daehee Kang, Keun-Young Yoo, Dong-Young Noh, Mikael Hartman, Hui Miao, Kee Seng Chia, Thomas Choudary Putti, Ute Hamann, Craig Luccarini, Caroline Baynes, Shahana Ahmed, Mel Maranian, Catherine S Healey, Anna Jakubowska, Jan Lubiński, Katarzyna Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna Durda, Suleeporn Sangrajrang, Valerie Gaborieau, Paul Brennan, James McKay, Susan Slager, Amanda E Toland, Drakoulis Yannoukakos, Chen-Yang Shen, Chia-Ni Hsiung, Pei-Ei Wu, Shian-Ling Ding, Alan Ashworth, Michael Jones, Nick Orr, Anthony J Swerdlow, Helen Tsimiklis, Enes Makalic, Daniel F Schmidt, Quang M Bui, Stephen J Chanock, David J Hunter, Rebecca Hein, Norbert Dahmen, Lars Beckmann, Kirsimari Aaltonen, Taru A Muranen, Tuomas Heikkinen, Astrid Irwanto, Nazneen Rahman, Clare A Turnbull, Quinten Waisfisz, Hanne E J Meijers-Heijboer, Muriel A Adank, Rob B van der Luijt, Per Hall, Georgia Chenevix-Trench, Alison Dunning, Douglas F Easton, Angela Cox.
Hum. Mol. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 08-28-2014
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Previous studies have suggested that polymorphisms in CASP8 on chromosome 2 are associated with breast cancer risk. To clarify the role of CASP8 in breast cancer susceptibility, we carried out dense genotyping of this region in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC). Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) spanning a 1 Mb region around CASP8 were genotyped in 46 450 breast cancer cases and 42 600 controls of European origin from 41 studies participating in the BCAC as part of a custom genotyping array experiment (iCOGS). Missing genotypes and SNPs were imputed and, after quality exclusions, 501 typed and 1232 imputed SNPs were included in logistic regression models adjusting for study and ancestry principal components. The SNPs retained in the final model were investigated further in data from nine genome-wide association studies (GWAS) comprising in total 10 052 case and 12 575 control subjects. The most significant association signal observed in European subjects was for the imputed intronic SNP rs1830298 in ALS2CR12 (telomeric to CASP8), with per allele odds ratio and 95% confidence interval [OR (95% confidence interval, CI)] for the minor allele of 1.05 (1.03-1.07), P = 1 × 10(-5). Three additional independent signals from intronic SNPs were identified, in CASP8 (rs36043647), ALS2CR11 (rs59278883) and CFLAR (rs7558475). The association with rs1830298 was replicated in the imputed results from the combined GWAS (P = 3 × 10(-6)), yielding a combined OR (95% CI) of 1.06 (1.04-1.08), P = 1 × 10(-9). Analyses of gene expression associations in peripheral blood and normal breast tissue indicate that CASP8 might be the target gene, suggesting a mechanism involving apoptosis.
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Genome-wide association study identifies five susceptibility loci for follicular lymphoma outside the HLA region.
Christine F Skibola, Sonja I Berndt, Joseph Vijai, Lucia Conde, Zhaoming Wang, Meredith Yeager, Paul I W de Bakker, Brenda M Birmann, Claire M Vajdic, Jia-Nee Foo, Paige M Bracci, Roel C H Vermeulen, Susan L Slager, Silvia de Sanjosé, Sophia S Wang, Martha S Linet, Gilles Salles, Qing Lan, Gianluca Severi, Henrik Hjalgrim, Tracy Lightfoot, Mads Melbye, Jian Gu, Hervé Ghesquières, Brian K Link, Lindsay M Morton, Elizabeth A Holly, Alex Smith, Lesley F Tinker, Lauren R Teras, Anne Kricker, Nikolaus Becker, Mark P Purdue, John J Spinelli, Yawei Zhang, Graham G Giles, Paolo Vineis, Alain Monnereau, Kimberly A Bertrand, Demetrius Albanes, Anne Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Attilio Gabbas, Charles C Chung, Laurie Burdett, Amy Hutchinson, Charles Lawrence, Rebecca Montalvan, Liming Liang, Jinyan Huang, Baoshan Ma, Jianjun Liu, Hans-Olov Adami, Bengt Glimelius, Yuanqing Ye, Grzegorz S Nowakowski, Ahmet Dogan, Carrie A Thompson, Thomas M Habermann, Anne J Novak, Mark Liebow, Thomas E Witzig, George J Weiner, Maryjean Schenk, Patricia Hartge, Anneclaire J De Roos, Wendy Cozen, Degui Zhi, Nicholas K Akers, Jacques Riby, Martyn T Smith, Mortimer Lacher, Danylo J Villano, Ann Maria, Eve Roman, Eleanor Kane, Rebecca D Jackson, Kari E North, W Ryan Diver, Jenny Turner, Bruce K Armstrong, Yolanda Benavente, Paolo Boffetta, Paul Brennan, Lenka Foretova, Marc Maynadié, Anthony Staines, James McKay, Angela R Brooks-Wilson, Tongzhang Zheng, Theodore R Holford, Saioa Chamosa, Rudolph Kaaks, Rachel S Kelly, Bodil Ohlsson, Ruth C Travis, Elisabete Weiderpass, Jacqueline Clavel, Edward Giovannucci, Peter Kraft, Jarmo Virtamo, Patrizio Mazza, Pierluigi Cocco, Maria Grazia Ennas, Brian C H Chiu, Joseph F Fraumeni, Alexandra Nieters, Kenneth Offit, Xifeng Wu, James R Cerhan, Karin E Smedby, Stephen J Chanock, Nathaniel Rothman.
Am. J. Hum. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 07-17-2014
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Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) of follicular lymphoma (FL) have previously identified human leukocyte antigen (HLA) gene variants. To identify additional FL susceptibility loci, we conducted a large-scale two-stage GWAS in 4,523 case subjects and 13,344 control subjects of European ancestry. Five non-HLA loci were associated with FL risk: 11q23.3 (rs4938573, p = 5.79 × 10(-20)) near CXCR5; 11q24.3 (rs4937362, p = 6.76 × 10(-11)) near ETS1; 3q28 (rs6444305, p = 1.10 × 10(-10)) in LPP; 18q21.33 (rs17749561, p = 8.28 × 10(-10)) near BCL2; and 8q24.21 (rs13254990, p = 1.06 × 10(-8)) near PVT1. In an analysis of the HLA region, we identified four linked HLA-DR?1 multiallelic amino acids at positions 11, 13, 28, and 30 that were associated with FL risk (pomnibus = 4.20 × 10(-67) to 2.67 × 10(-70)). Additional independent signals included rs17203612 in HLA class II (odds ratio [OR(per-allele)] = 1.44; p = 4.59 × 10(-16)) and rs3130437 in HLA class I (OR(per-allele) = 1.23; p = 8.23 × 10(-9)). Our findings further expand the number of loci associated with FL and provide evidence that multiple common variants outside the HLA region make a significant contribution to FL risk.
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Imputation and subset-based association analysis across different cancer types identifies multiple independent risk loci in the TERT-CLPTM1L region on chromosome 5p15.33.
Zhaoming Wang, Bin Zhu, Mingfeng Zhang, Hemang Parikh, Jinping Jia, Charles C Chung, Joshua N Sampson, Jason W Hoskins, Amy Hutchinson, Laurie Burdette, Abdisamad Ibrahim, Christopher Hautman, Preethi S Raj, Christian C Abnet, Andrew A Adjei, Anders Ahlbom, Demetrius Albanes, Naomi E Allen, Christine B Ambrosone, Melinda Aldrich, Pilar Amiano, Christopher Amos, Ulrika Andersson, Gerald Andriole, Irene L Andrulis, Cecilia Arici, Alan A Arslan, Melissa A Austin, Dalsu Baris, Donald A Barkauskas, Bryan A Bassig, Laura E Beane Freeman, Christine D Berg, Sonja I Berndt, Pier Alberto Bertazzi, Richard B Biritwum, Amanda Black, William Blot, Heiner Boeing, Paolo Boffetta, Kelly Bolton, Marie-Christine Boutron-Ruault, Paige M Bracci, Paul Brennan, Louise A Brinton, Michelle Brotzman, H Bas Bueno-de-Mesquita, Julie E Buring, Mary Ann Butler, Qiuyin Cai, Géraldine Cancel-Tassin, Federico Canzian, Guangwen Cao, Neil E Caporaso, Alfredo Carrato, Tania Carreon, Angela Carta, Gee-Chen Chang, I-Shou Chang, Jenny Chang-Claude, Xu Che, Chien-Jen Chen, Chih-Yi Chen, Chung-Hsing Chen, Constance Chen, Kuan-Yu Chen, Yuh-Min Chen, Anand P Chokkalingam, Lisa W Chu, Francoise Clavel-Chapelon, Graham A Colditz, Joanne S Colt, David Conti, Michael B Cook, Victoria K Cortessis, E David Crawford, Olivier Cussenot, Faith G Davis, Immaculata De Vivo, Xiang Deng, Ti Ding, Colin P Dinney, Anna Luisa Di Stefano, W Ryan Diver, Eric J Duell, Joanne W Elena, Jin-Hu Fan, Heather Spencer Feigelson, Maria Feychting, Jonine D Figueroa, Adrienne M Flanagan, Joseph F Fraumeni, Neal D Freedman, Brooke L Fridley, Charles S Fuchs, Manuela Gago-Dominguez, Steven Gallinger, Yu-Tang Gao, Susan M Gapstur, Montserrat Garcia-Closas, Reina Garcia-Closas, Julie M Gastier-Foster, J Michael Gaziano, Daniela S Gerhard, Carol A Giffen, Graham G Giles, Elizabeth M Gillanders, Edward L Giovannucci, Michael Goggins, Nalan Gokgoz, Alisa M Goldstein, Carlos González, Richard Gorlick, Mark H Greene, Myron Gross, H Barton Grossman, Robert Grubb, Jian Gu, Peng Guan, Christopher A Haiman, Göran Hallmans, Susan E Hankinson, Curtis C Harris, Patricia Hartge, Claudia Hattinger, Richard B Hayes, Qincheng He, Lee Helman, Brian E Henderson, Roger Henriksson, Judith Hoffman-Bolton, Chancellor Hohensee, Elizabeth A Holly, Yun-Chul Hong, Robert N Hoover, H Dean Hosgood, Chin-Fu Hsiao, Ann W Hsing, Chao Agnes Hsiung, Nan Hu, Wei Hu, Zhibin Hu, Ming-Shyan Huang, David J Hunter, Peter D Inskip, Hidemi Ito, Eric J Jacobs, Kevin B Jacobs, Mazda Jenab, Bu-Tian Ji, Christoffer Johansen, Mattias Johansson, Alison Johnson, Rudolf Kaaks, Ashish M Kamat, Aruna Kamineni, Margaret Karagas, Chand Khanna, Kay-Tee Khaw, Christopher Kim, In-Sam Kim, Jin Hee Kim, Yeul Hong Kim, Young-Chul Kim, Young Tae Kim, Chang Hyun Kang, Yoo Jin Jung, Cari M Kitahara, Alison P Klein, Robert Klein, Manolis Kogevinas, Woon-Puay Koh, Takashi Kohno, Laurence N Kolonel, Charles Kooperberg, Christian P Kratz, Vittorio Krogh, Hideo Kunitoh, Robert C Kurtz, Nilgun Kurucu, Qing Lan, Mark Lathrop, Ching C Lau, Fernando Lecanda, Kyoung-Mu Lee, Maxwell P Lee, Loic Le Marchand, Seth P Lerner, Donghui Li, Linda M Liao, Wei-Yen Lim, Dongxin Lin, Jie Lin, Sara Lindstrom, Martha S Linet, Jolanta Lissowska, Jianjun Liu, Börje Ljungberg, Josep Lloreta, Daru Lu, Jing Ma, Nuria Malats, Satu Mannisto, Neyssa Marina, Giuseppe Mastrangelo, Keitaro Matsuo, Katherine A McGlynn, Roberta Mckean-Cowdin, Lorna H McNeill, Robert R McWilliams, Beatrice S Melin, Paul S Meltzer, James E Mensah, Xiaoping Miao, Dominique S Michaud, Alison M Mondul, Lee E Moore, Kenneth Muir, Shelley Niwa, Sara H Olson, Nick Orr, Salvatore Panico, Jae Yong Park, Alpa V Patel, Ana Patiño-García, Sofia Pavanello, Petra H M Peeters, Beata Peplonska, Ulrike Peters, Gloria M Petersen, Piero Picci, Malcolm C Pike, Stefano Porru, Jennifer Prescott, Xia Pu, Mark P Purdue, You-Lin Qiao, Preetha Rajaraman, Elio Riboli, Harvey A Risch, Rebecca J Rodabough, Nathaniel Rothman, Avima M Ruder, Jeong-Seon Ryu, Marc Sanson, Alan Schned, Fredrick R Schumacher, Ann G Schwartz, Kendra L Schwartz, Molly Schwenn, Katia Scotlandi, Adeline Seow, Consol Serra, Massimo Serra, Howard D Sesso, Gianluca Severi, Hongbing Shen, Min Shen, Sanjay Shete, Kouya Shiraishi, Xiao-Ou Shu, Afshan Siddiq, Luis Sierrasesúmaga, Sabina Sierri, Alan Dart Loon Sihoe, Debra T Silverman, Matthias Simon, Melissa C Southey, Logan Spector, Margaret Spitz, Meir Stampfer, Pär Stattin, Mariana C Stern, Victoria L Stevens, Rachael Z Stolzenberg-Solomon, Daniel O Stram, Sara S Strom, Wu-Chou Su, Malin Sund, Sook Whan Sung, Anthony Swerdlow, Wen Tan, Hideo Tanaka, Wei Tang, Ze-Zhang Tang, Adonina Tardón, Evelyn Tay, Philip R Taylor, Yao Tettey, David M Thomas, Roberto Tirabosco, Anne Tjonneland, Geoffrey S Tobias, Jorge R Toro, Ruth C Travis, Dimitrios Trichopoulos, Rebecca Troisi, Ann Truelove, Ying-Huang Tsai, Margaret A Tucker, Rosario Tumino, David Van Den Berg, Stephen K Van Den Eeden, Roel Vermeulen, Paolo Vineis, Kala Visvanathan, Ulla Vogel, Chaoyu Wang, Chengfeng Wang, Junwen Wang, Sophia S Wang, Elisabete Weiderpass, Stephanie J Weinstein, Nicolas Wentzensen, William Wheeler, Emily White, John K Wiencke, Alicja Wolk, Brian M Wolpin, Maria Pik Wong, Margaret Wrensch, Chen Wu, Tangchun Wu, Xifeng Wu, Yi-Long Wu, Jay S Wunder, Yong-Bing Xiang, Jun Xu, Hannah P Yang, Pan-Chyr Yang, Yasushi Yatabe, Yuanqing Ye, Edward D Yeboah, Zhihua Yin, Chen Ying, Chong-Jen Yu, Kai Yu, Jian-Min Yuan, Krista A Zanetti, Anne Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Wei Zheng, Baosen Zhou, Lisa Mirabello, Sharon A Savage, Peter Kraft, Stephen J Chanock, Meredith Yeager, Maria Terese Landi, Jianxin Shi, Nilanjan Chatterjee, Laufey T Amundadottir.
Hum. Mol. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 07-15-2014
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Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have mapped risk alleles for at least 10 distinct cancers to a small region of 63 000 bp on chromosome 5p15.33. This region harbors the TERT and CLPTM1L genes; the former encodes the catalytic subunit of telomerase reverse transcriptase and the latter may play a role in apoptosis. To investigate further the genetic architecture of common susceptibility alleles in this region, we conducted an agnostic subset-based meta-analysis (association analysis based on subsets) across six distinct cancers in 34 248 cases and 45 036 controls. Based on sequential conditional analysis, we identified as many as six independent risk loci marked by common single-nucleotide polymorphisms: five in the TERT gene (Region 1: rs7726159, P = 2.10 × 10(-39); Region 3: rs2853677, P = 3.30 × 10(-36) and PConditional = 2.36 × 10(-8); Region 4: rs2736098, P = 3.87 × 10(-12) and PConditional = 5.19 × 10(-6), Region 5: rs13172201, P = 0.041 and PConditional = 2.04 × 10(-6); and Region 6: rs10069690, P = 7.49 × 10(-15) and PConditional = 5.35 × 10(-7)) and one in the neighboring CLPTM1L gene (Region 2: rs451360; P = 1.90 × 10(-18) and PConditional = 7.06 × 10(-16)). Between three and five cancers mapped to each independent locus with both risk-enhancing and protective effects. Allele-specific effects on DNA methylation were seen for a subset of risk loci, indicating that methylation and subsequent effects on gene expression may contribute to the biology of risk variants on 5p15.33. Our results provide strong support for extensive pleiotropy across this region of 5p15.33, to an extent not previously observed in other cancer susceptibility loci.
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Proteomics-based strategies to identify proteins relevant to chronic lymphocytic leukemia.
J. Proteome Res.
PUBLISHED: 07-14-2014
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Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), a malignant B-cell disorder, is characterized by a heterogeneous clinical course. Two-dimensional nano liquid chromatography (2D-nano-LC) coupled with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF MS) (LC-MALDI) was used to perform qualitative and quantitative analysis on cellular extracts from 12 primary CLL samples. We identified 728 proteins and quantified 655 proteins using isobaric tag-labeled extracts. Four strategies were used to identify disease-related proteins. First, we integrated our CLL proteome with published gene expression data of normal B-cells and CLL cells to highlight proteins with preferential expression in the transcriptome of CLL. Second, as CLL's outcome is heterogeneous, our quantitative proteomic data were used to indicate heterogeneously expressed proteins. Third, we used the quantitative data to identify proteins with differential abundance in poor prognosis CLL samples. Fourth, hierarchical cluster analysis was applied to identify hidden patterns of protein expression. These strategies identified 63 proteins, and 4 were investigated in a CLL cohort (39 patients). Thyroid hormone receptor-associated protein 3, T-cell leukemia/lymphoma protein 1A, and S100A8 were associated with high-risk CLL. Myosin-9 exhibited reduced expression in CLL samples from high-risk patients. This study shows the usefulness of proteomic approaches, combined with transcriptomics, to identify disease-related proteins.
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Genome-wide association study identifies multiple susceptibility loci for diffuse large B cell lymphoma.
James R Cerhan, Sonja I Berndt, Joseph Vijai, Hervé Ghesquières, James McKay, Sophia S Wang, Zhaoming Wang, Meredith Yeager, Lucia Conde, Paul I W de Bakker, Alexandra Nieters, David Cox, Laurie Burdett, Alain Monnereau, Christopher R Flowers, Anneclaire J De Roos, Angela R Brooks-Wilson, Qing Lan, Gianluca Severi, Mads Melbye, Jian Gu, Rebecca D Jackson, Eleanor Kane, Lauren R Teras, Mark P Purdue, Claire M Vajdic, John J Spinelli, Graham G Giles, Demetrius Albanes, Rachel S Kelly, Mariagrazia Zucca, Kimberly A Bertrand, Anne Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Charles Lawrence, Amy Hutchinson, Degui Zhi, Thomas M Habermann, Brian K Link, Anne J Novak, Ahmet Dogan, Yan W Asmann, Mark Liebow, Carrie A Thompson, Stephen M Ansell, Thomas E Witzig, George J Weiner, Amelie S Veron, Diana Zelenika, Hervé Tilly, Corinne Haioun, Thierry Jo Molina, Henrik Hjalgrim, Bengt Glimelius, Hans-Olov Adami, Paige M Bracci, Jacques Riby, Martyn T Smith, Elizabeth A Holly, Wendy Cozen, Patricia Hartge, Lindsay M Morton, Richard K Severson, Lesley F Tinker, Kari E North, Nikolaus Becker, Yolanda Benavente, Paolo Boffetta, Paul Brennan, Lenka Foretova, Marc Maynadié, Anthony Staines, Tracy Lightfoot, Simon Crouch, Alex Smith, Eve Roman, W Ryan Diver, Kenneth Offit, Andrew Zelenetz, Robert J Klein, Danylo J Villano, Tongzhang Zheng, Yawei Zhang, Theodore R Holford, Anne Kricker, Jenny Turner, Melissa C Southey, Jacqueline Clavel, Jarmo Virtamo, Stephanie Weinstein, Elio Riboli, Paolo Vineis, Rudolph Kaaks, Dimitrios Trichopoulos, Roel C H Vermeulen, Heiner Boeing, Anne Tjonneland, Emanuele Angelucci, Simonetta Di Lollo, Marco Rais, Brenda M Birmann, Francine Laden, Edward Giovannucci, Peter Kraft, Jinyan Huang, Baoshan Ma, Yuanqing Ye, Brian C H Chiu, Joshua Sampson, Liming Liang, Ju-Hyun Park, Charles C Chung, Dennis D Weisenburger, Nilanjan Chatterjee, Joseph F Fraumeni, Susan L Slager, Xifeng Wu, Silvia de Sanjosé, Karin E Smedby, Gilles Salles, Christine F Skibola, Nathaniel Rothman, Stephen J Chanock.
Nat. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 06-26-2014
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Diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is the most common lymphoma subtype and is clinically aggressive. To identify genetic susceptibility loci for DLBCL, we conducted a meta-analysis of 3 new genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and 1 previous scan, totaling 3,857 cases and 7,666 controls of European ancestry, with additional genotyping of 9 promising SNPs in 1,359 cases and 4,557 controls. In our multi-stage analysis, five independent SNPs in four loci achieved genome-wide significance marked by rs116446171 at 6p25.3 (EXOC2; P = 2.33 × 10(-21)), rs2523607 at 6p21.33 (HLA-B; P = 2.40 × 10(-10)), rs79480871 at 2p23.3 (NCOA1; P = 4.23 × 10(-8)) and two independent SNPs, rs13255292 and rs4733601, at 8q24.21 (PVT1; P = 9.98 × 10(-13) and 3.63 × 10(-11), respectively). These data provide substantial new evidence for genetic susceptibility to this B cell malignancy and point to pathways involved in immune recognition and immune function in the pathogenesis of DLBCL.
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Mitochondrial DNA copy number and future risk of B-cell lymphoma in a nested case-control study in the prospective EPIC cohort.
Blood
PUBLISHED: 06-04-2014
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It has been suggested that mitochondrial dysfunction and DNA damage are involved in lymphomagenesis. Increased copy number of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) as a compensatory mechanism of mitochondrial dysfunction previously has been associated with B-cell lymphomas, in particular chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). However, current evidence is limited and based on a relatively small number of cases. Using a nested case-control study, we extended these findings with a focus on subtype-specific analyses. Relative mtDNA copy number was measured in the buffy coat of prospectively collected blood of 469 lymphoma cases and 469 matched controls. The association between mtDNA copy number and the risk of developing lymphoma and histologic subtypes was examined using logistic regression models. We found no overall association between mtDNA and risk of lymphoma. Subtype analyses revealed significant increased risks of CLL (n = 102) with increasing mtDNA copy number (odds ratio = 1.34, 1.44, and 1.80 for quartiles 2-4, respectively; P trend = .001). mtDNA copy number was not associated with follow-up time, suggesting that this observation is not strongly influenced by indolent disease status. This study substantially strengthens the evidence that mtDNA copy number is related to risk of CLL and supports the importance of mitochondrial dysfunction as a possible mechanistic pathway in CLL ontogenesis.
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Variation in genomic landscape of clear cell renal cell carcinoma across Europe.
Nat Commun
PUBLISHED: 05-30-2014
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The incidence of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is increasing worldwide, and its prevalence is particularly high in some parts of Central Europe. Here we undertake whole-genome and transcriptome sequencing of clear cell RCC (ccRCC), the most common form of the disease, in patients from four different European countries with contrasting disease incidence to explore the underlying genomic architecture of RCC. Our findings support previous reports on frequent aberrations in the epigenetic machinery and PI3K/mTOR signalling, and uncover novel pathways and genes affected by recurrent mutations and abnormal transcriptome patterns including focal adhesion, components of extracellular matrix (ECM) and genes encoding FAT cadherins. Furthermore, a large majority of patients from Romania have an unexpected high frequency of A:T>T:A transversions, consistent with exposure to aristolochic acid (AA). These results show that the processes underlying ccRCC tumorigenesis may vary in different populations and suggest that AA may be an important ccRCC carcinogen in Romania, a finding with major public health implications.
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Genetic variation at CYP3A is associated with age at menarche and breast cancer risk: a case-control study.
Nichola Johnson, Frank Dudbridge, Nick Orr, Lorna Gibson, Michael E Jones, Minouk J Schoemaker, Elizabeth J Folkerd, Ben P Haynes, John L Hopper, Melissa C Southey, Gillian S Dite, Carmel Apicella, Marjanka K Schmidt, Annegien Broeks, Laura J Van T Veer, Femke Atsma, Kenneth Muir, Artitaya Lophatananon, Peter A Fasching, Matthias W Beckmann, Arif B Ekici, Stefan P Renner, Elinor Sawyer, Ian Tomlinson, Michael Kerin, Nicola Miller, Barbara Burwinkel, Frederik Marme, Andreas Schneeweiss, Christof Sohn, Pascal Guénel, Thérèse Truong, Emilie Cordina, Florence Menegaux, Stig E Bojesen, Børge G Nordestgaard, Henrik Flyger, Roger Milne, M Pilar Zamora, José Ignacio Arias Perez, Javier Benitez, Leslie Bernstein, Hoda Anton-Culver, Argyrios Ziogas, Christina Clarke Dur, Hermann Brenner, Heiko Muller, Volker Arndt, Aida Karina Dieffenbach, Alfons Meindl, Joerg Heil, Claus R Bartram, Rita K Schmutzler, Hiltrud Brauch, Christina Justenhoven, Yon-Dschun Ko, Heli Nevanlinna, Taru A Muranen, Kristiina Aittomäki, Carl Blomqvist, Keitaro Matsuo, Thilo Dörk, Natalia V Bogdanova, Natalia N Antonenkova, Annika Lindblom, Arto Mannermaa, Vesa Kataja, Veli-Matti Kosma, Jaana M Hartikainen, Georgia Chenevix-Trench, Jonathan Beesley, Anna H Wu, David Van Den Berg, Chiu-Chen Tseng, Diether Lambrechts, Dominiek Smeets, Patrick Neven, Hans Wildiers, Jenny Chang-Claude, Anja Rudolph, Stefan Nickels, Dieter Flesch-Janys, Paolo Radice, Paolo Peterlongo, Bernardo Bonanni, Valeria Pensotti, Fergus J Couch, Janet E Olson, Xianshu Wang, Zachary Fredericksen, Vernon S Pankratz, Graham G Giles, Gianluca Severi, Laura Baglietto, Chris Haiman, Jacques Simard, Mark S Goldberg, France Labrèche, Martine Dumont, Penny Soucy, Soo Teo, Cheng Har Yip, Sze Yee Phuah, Belinda K Cornes, Vessela N Kristensen, Grethe Grenaker Alnæs, Anne-Lise Børresen-Dale, Wei Zheng, Robert Winqvist, Katri Pylkäs, Arja Jukkola-Vuorinen, Mervi Grip, Irene L Andrulis, Julia A Knight, Gord Glendon, Anna Marie Mulligan, Peter Devillee, Jonine Figueroa, Stephen J Chanock, Jolanta Lissowska, Mark E Sherman, Per Hall, Nils Schoof, Maartje Hooning, Antoinette Hollestelle, Rogier A Oldenburg, Madeleine Tilanus-Linthorst, Jianjun Liu, Angie Cox, Ian W Brock, Malcolm Wr Reed, Simon S Cross, William Blot, Lisa B Signorello, Paul Dp Pharoah, Alison M Dunning, Mitul Shah, Daehee Kang, Dong-Young Noh, Sue K Park, Ji-Yeob Choi, Mikael Hartman, Hui Miao, Wei Yen Lim, Anthony Tang, Ute Hamann, Asta Försti, Thomas Rüdiger, Hans Ulrich Ulmer, Anna Jakubowska, Jan Lubiński, Katarzyna Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna Durda, Suleeporn Sangrajrang, Valerie Gaborieau, Paul Brennan, James McKay, Susan Slager, Amanda E Toland, Celine Vachon, Drakoulis Yannoukakos, Chen-Yang Shen, Jyh-Cherng Yu, Chiun-Sheng Huang, Ming-Feng Hou, Anna González-Neira, Daniel C Tessier, Daniel Vincent, Francois Bacot, Craig Luccarini, Joe Dennis, Kyriaki Michailidou, Manjeet K Bolla, Jean Wang, Douglas F Easton, Montserrat Garcia-Closas, Mitch Dowsett, Alan Ashworth, Anthony J Swerdlow, Julian Peto, Isabel Dos Santos Silva, Olivia Fletcher.
Breast Cancer Res.
PUBLISHED: 05-26-2014
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We have previously shown that a tag single nucleotide polymorphism (rs10235235), which maps to the CYP3A locus (7q22.1), was associated with a reduction in premenopausal urinary estrone glucuronide levels and a modest reduction in risk of breast cancer in women age <=50 years.
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Rare variants of large effect in BRCA2 and CHEK2 affect risk of lung cancer.
Nat. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 05-08-2014
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We conducted imputation to the 1000 Genomes Project of four genome-wide association studies of lung cancer in populations of European ancestry (11,348 cases and 15,861 controls) and genotyped an additional 10,246 cases and 38,295 controls for follow-up. We identified large-effect genome-wide associations for squamous lung cancer with the rare variants BRCA2 p.Lys3326X (rs11571833, odds ratio (OR) = 2.47, P = 4.74 × 10(-20)) and CHEK2 p.Ile157Thr (rs17879961, OR = 0.38, P = 1.27 × 10(-13)). We also showed an association between common variation at 3q28 (TP63, rs13314271, OR = 1.13, P = 7.22 × 10(-10)) and lung adenocarcinoma that had been previously reported only in Asians. These findings provide further evidence for inherited genetic susceptibility to lung cancer and its biological basis. Additionally, our analysis demonstrates that imputation can identify rare disease-causing variants with substantive effects on cancer risk from preexisting genome-wide association study data.
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No causal association identified for human papillomavirus infections in lung cancer.
Cancer Res.
PUBLISHED: 04-23-2014
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Human papillomavirus (HPV) infections have been implicated in lung carcinogenesis, but causal associations remain uncertain. We evaluated a potential causal role for HPV infections in lung cancer through an analysis involving serology, tumor DNA, RNA, and p16 protein expression. Association between type-specific HPV antibodies and risk of lung cancer was examined among 3,083 cases and 4,328 controls in two case-control studies (retrospective) and one nested case-control study (prospective design). Three hundred and thirty-four available tumors were subjected to pathologic evaluation and subsequent HPV genotyping following stringent conditions to detect all high-risk and two low-risk HPV types. All HPV DNA-positive tumors were further tested for the expression of p16 protein and type-specific HPV mRNA. On the basis of the consistency of the results, although HPV11 and HPV31 E6 antibodies were associated with lung cancer risk in the retrospective study, no association was observed in the prospective design. Presence of type-specific antibodies correlated poorly with the presence of the corresponding HPV DNA in the tumor. Although nearly 10% of the lung tumors were positive for any HPV DNA (7% for HPV16 DNA), none expressed the viral oncogenes. No association was observed between HPV antibodies or DNA and lung cancer survival. In conclusion, we found no supportive evidence for the hypothesized causal association between HPV infections and lung cancer.
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Accessible or Inaccessible? Diagnostic Efficacy of CT-Guided Core Biopsies of Head and Neck Masses.
Cardiovasc Intervent Radiol
PUBLISHED: 04-02-2014
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Tissue sampling of lesions in the head and neck is challenging due to complex regional anatomy and sometimes necessitates open surgical biopsy. However, many patients are poor surgical candidates due to comorbidity. Thus, we evaluated the use of CT guidance for establishing histopathological diagnosis of head and neck masses.
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Genetic variants in DNA repair pathways and risk of upper aerodigestive tract cancers: combined analysis of data from two genome-wide association studies in European populations.
Carcinogenesis
PUBLISHED: 03-21-2014
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DNA repair pathways are good candidates for upper aerodigestive tract cancer susceptibility because of their critical role in maintaining genome integrity. We have selected 13 pathways involved in DNA repair representing 212 autosomal genes. To assess the role of these pathways and their associated genes, two European data sets from the International Head and Neck Cancer Epidemiology consortium were pooled, totaling 1954 cases and 3121 controls, with documented demographic, lifetime alcohol and tobacco consumption information. We applied an innovative approach that tests single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-sets within DNA repair pathways and then within genes belonging to the significant pathways. We showed an association between the polymerase pathway and oral cavity/pharynx cancers (P-corrected = 4.45 × 10(-) (2)), explained entirely by the association with one SNP, rs1494961 (P = 2.65 × 10(-) (4)), a missense mutation V306I in the second exon of HELQ gene. We also found an association between the cell cycle regulation pathway and esophagus cancer (P-corrected = 1.48 × 10(-) (2)), explained by three SNPs located within or near CSNK1E gene: rs1534891 (P = 1.27 × 10(-) (4)), rs7289981 (P = 3.37 × 10(-) (3)) and rs13054361 (P = 4.09 × 10(-) (3)). As a first attempt to investigate pathway-level associations, our results suggest a role of specific DNA repair genes/pathways in specific upper aerodigestive tract cancer sites.
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Most blood biomarkers related to vitamin status, one-carbon metabolism, and the kynurenine pathway show adequate preanalytical stability and within-person reproducibility to allow assessment of exposure or nutritional status in healthy women and cardiovascular patients.
J. Nutr.
PUBLISHED: 03-19-2014
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Knowledge of stability during sample transportation and changes in biomarker concentrations within person over time are paramount for proper design and interpretation of epidemiologic studies based on a single measurement of biomarker status. Therefore, we investigated stability and intraindividual vs. interindividual variation in blood concentrations of biomarkers related to vitamin status, one-carbon metabolism, and the kynurenine pathway. Whole blood (EDTA and heparin, n = 12) was stored with an icepack for 24 or 48 h, and plasma concentrations of 38 biomarkers were determined. Stability was calculated as change per hour, intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC), and simple Spearman correlation. Within-person reproducibility of biomarkers was expressed as ICC in samples collected 1-2 y apart from 40 postmenopausal women and in samples collected up to 3 y apart from 551 patients with stable angina pectoris. Biomarker stability was similar in EDTA and heparin blood. Most biomarkers were essentially stable, except for choline and total homocysteine (tHcy), which increased markedly. Within-person reproducibility in postmenopausal women was excellent (ICC > 0.75) for cotinine, all-trans retinol, cobalamin, riboflavin, ?-tocopherol, Gly, pyridoxal, methylmalonic acid, creatinine, pyridoxal 5'-phosphate, and Ser; was good to fair (ICC of 0.74-0.40) for pyridoxic acid, kynurenine, tHcy, cholecalciferol, flavin mononucleotide, kynurenic acid, xanthurenic acid, 3-hydroxykynurenine, sarcosine, anthranilic acid, cystathionine, homoarginine, 3-hydroxyanthranilic acid, betaine, Arg, folate, total cysteine, dimethylglycine, asymmetric dimethylarginine, neopterin, symmetric dimethylarginine, and Trp; and poor (ICC of 0.39-0.15) for methionine sulfoxide, Met, choline, and trimethyllysine. Similar reproducibilities were observed in patients with coronary heart disease. Thus, most biomarkers investigated were essentially stable in cooled whole blood for up to 48 h and had a sufficient within-person reproducibility to allow one-exposure assessment of biomarker status in epidemiologic studies. The Western Norway B Vitamin Intervention Trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NTC00354081.
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Development and characterization of a physiologically relevant model of lymphocyte migration in chronic lymphocytic leukemia.
Blood
PUBLISHED: 03-17-2014
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There is growing evidence that lymphocyte trafficking contributes to the clinical course of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), but to date, only static in vitro cultures have been used to study these phenomena. To address this lack of data, we have developed a dynamic in vitro model in which CLL cells experience shear forces equivalent to those in capillary beds and are made to flow through capillary-like hollow fibers lined with endothelial cells. CLL cells treated in this way increased their expression of CD62L and CXCR4 (both P < .0001) and of CD49d and CD5 (both P = .003) directly as a result of the shear force. Furthermore, CLL cells migrated through the endothelium into the "extravascular" space (mean migration, 1.37% ± 2.14%; n = 21). Migrated CLL cells had significantly higher expression of CD49d (P = .02), matrix metallopeptidase-9 (P = .004), CD38 (P = .009), CD80 (P = .04), and CD69 (P = .04) compared with CLL cells that remained in the circulation. The degree of migration observed strongly correlated with CD49d expression (r(2), 0.47; P = .01), and treatment with the CD49d-blocking antibody natalizumab resulted in significantly decreased migration (P = .01). Taken together, our data provide evidence for a novel, dynamic, and tractable in vitro model of lymphocyte migration and confirm that CD49d is a critical regulator of this process in CLL.
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Evidence that breast cancer risk at the 2q35 locus is mediated through IGFBP5 regulation.
Maya Ghoussaini, Stacey L Edwards, Kyriaki Michailidou, Silje Nord, Richard Cowper-Sal Lari, Kinjal Desai, Siddhartha Kar, Kristine M Hillman, Susanne Kaufmann, Dylan M Glubb, Jonathan Beesley, Joe Dennis, Manjeet K Bolla, Qin Wang, Ed Dicks, Qi Guo, Marjanka K Schmidt, Mitul Shah, Robert Luben, Judith Brown, Kamila Czene, Hatef Darabi, Mikael Eriksson, Daniel Klevebring, Stig E Bojesen, Børge G Nordestgaard, Sune F Nielsen, Henrik Flyger, Diether Lambrechts, Bernard Thienpont, Patrick Neven, Hans Wildiers, Annegien Broeks, Laura J Van't Veer, Emiel J Th Rutgers, Fergus J Couch, Janet E Olson, Emily Hallberg, Celine Vachon, Jenny Chang-Claude, Anja Rudolph, Petra Seibold, Dieter Flesch-Janys, Julian Peto, Isabel Dos-Santos-Silva, Lorna Gibson, Heli Nevanlinna, Taru A Muranen, Kristiina Aittomäki, Carl Blomqvist, Per Hall, Jingmei Li, Jianjun Liu, Keith Humphreys, Daehee Kang, Ji-Yeob Choi, Sue K Park, Dong-Young Noh, Keitaro Matsuo, Hidemi Ito, Hiroji Iwata, Yasushi Yatabe, Pascal Guénel, Thérèse Truong, Florence Menegaux, Marie Sanchez, Barbara Burwinkel, Frederik Marme, Andreas Schneeweiss, Christof Sohn, Anna H Wu, Chiu-Chen Tseng, David Van Den Berg, Daniel O Stram, Javier Benitez, M Pilar Zamora, Jose Ignacio Arias Perez, Primitiva Menéndez, Xiao-Ou Shu, Wei Lu, Yu-Tang Gao, Qiuyin Cai, Angela Cox, Simon S Cross, Malcolm W R Reed, Irene L Andrulis, Julia A Knight, Gord Glendon, Sandrine Tchatchou, Elinor J Sawyer, Ian Tomlinson, Michael J Kerin, Nicola Miller, Christopher A Haiman, Brian E Henderson, Fredrick Schumacher, Loic Le Marchand, Annika Lindblom, Sara Margolin, Soo Hwang Teo, Cheng Har Yip, Daphne S C Lee, Tien Y Wong, Maartje J Hooning, John W M Martens, J Margriet Collée, Carolien H M van Deurzen, John L Hopper, Melissa C Southey, Helen Tsimiklis, Miroslav K Kapuscinski, Chen-Yang Shen, Pei-Ei Wu, Jyh-Cherng Yu, Shou-Tung Chen, Grethe Grenaker Alnæs, Anne-Lise Borresen-Dale, Graham G Giles, Roger L Milne, Catriona McLean, Kenneth Muir, Artitaya Lophatananon, Sarah Stewart-Brown, Pornthep Siriwanarangsan, Mikael Hartman, Hui Miao, Shaik Ahmad Bin Syed Buhari, Yik Ying Teo, Peter A Fasching, Lothar Haeberle, Arif B Ekici, Matthias W Beckmann, Hermann Brenner, Aida Karina Dieffenbach, Volker Arndt, Christa Stegmaier, Anthony Swerdlow, Alan Ashworth, Nick Orr, Minouk J Schoemaker, Montserrat Garcia-Closas, Jonine Figueroa, Stephen J Chanock, Jolanta Lissowska, Jacques Simard, Mark S Goldberg, France Labrèche, Martine Dumont, Robert Winqvist, Katri Pylkäs, Arja Jukkola-Vuorinen, Hiltrud Brauch, Thomas Brüning, Yon-Dschun Koto, Paolo Radice, Paolo Peterlongo, Bernardo Bonanni, Sara Volorio, Thilo Dörk, Natalia V Bogdanova, Sonja Helbig, Arto Mannermaa, Vesa Kataja, Veli-Matti Kosma, Jaana M Hartikainen, Peter Devilee, Robert A E M Tollenaar, Caroline Seynaeve, Christi J van Asperen, Anna Jakubowska, Jan Lubiński, Katarzyna Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna Durda, Susan Slager, Amanda E Toland, Christine B Ambrosone, Drakoulis Yannoukakos, Suleeporn Sangrajrang, Valerie Gaborieau, Paul Brennan, James McKay, Ute Hamann, Diana Torres, Wei Zheng, Jirong Long, Hoda Anton-Culver, Susan L Neuhausen, Craig Luccarini, Caroline Baynes, Shahana Ahmed, Mel Maranian, Catherine S Healey, Anna González-Neira, Guillermo Pita, M Rosario Alonso, Nuria Alvarez, Daniel Herrero, Daniel C Tessier, Daniel Vincent, Francois Bacot, Ines de Santiago, Jason Carroll, Carlos Caldas, Melissa A Brown, Mathieu Lupien, Vessela N Kristensen, Paul D P Pharoah, Georgia Chenevix-Trench, Juliet D French, Douglas F Easton, Alison M Dunning, .
Nat Commun
PUBLISHED: 03-12-2014
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GWAS have identified a breast cancer susceptibility locus on 2q35. Here we report the fine mapping of this locus using data from 101,943 subjects from 50 case-control studies. We genotype 276 SNPs using the 'iCOGS' genotyping array and impute genotypes for a further 1,284 using 1000 Genomes Project data. All but two, strongly correlated SNPs (rs4442975 G/T and rs6721996 G/A) are excluded as candidate causal variants at odds against >100:1. The best functional candidate, rs4442975, is associated with oestrogen receptor positive (ER+) disease with an odds ratio (OR) in Europeans of 0.85 (95% confidence interval=0.84-0.87; P=1.7 × 10(-43)) per t-allele. This SNP flanks a transcriptional enhancer that physically interacts with the promoter of IGFBP5 (encoding insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 5) and displays allele-specific gene expression, FOXA1 binding and chromatin looping. Evidence suggests that the g-allele confers increased breast cancer susceptibility through relative downregulation of IGFBP5, a gene with known roles in breast cell biology.
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Anthropometric measures and bladder cancer risk: A prospective study in the EPIC cohort.
Int. J. Cancer
PUBLISHED: 03-10-2014
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Anthropometric measures have been related to risk of several cancers. For bladder cancer, however, evidence is sparse. Comparability of existing studies is hampered by use of different obesity-measures, inadequate control for smoking, and few female cases. This study examined associations between height, weight, waist and hip circumference, waist-hip ratio, waist-height ratio, body mass index (BMI), recalled weight at age 20 and bladder cancer, and investigated effect modification by age, tumor aggressiveness and smoking. The study was conducted in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition cohort, in 390,878 participants. Associations were calculated using Cox Proportional Hazards Models. During follow-up, 1,391 bladder cancers (1,018 male; 373 female) occurred. Height was unrelated to bladder cancer in both genders. We found a small but significant positive association with weight [1.04 (1.01-1.07) per 5 kilo], BMI [1.05 (1.02-1.08) per 2 units], waist circumference [1.04 (1.01-1.08) per 5 cm], waist-hip ratio (1.07 (1.02-1.13) per 0.05 unit] and waist-height ratio [1.07 (1.01-1.13) per 0.05 unit] in men. Stratification by smoking status confined associations in men to former smokers. In never smokers, we found no significant associations, suggesting residual confounding by smoking. Results did not differ with tumor aggressiveness and age. Residual analyses on BMI/waist circumference showed a significantly higher disease risk with BMI in men (p?=?0.01), but no association with waist circumference. In conclusion, in this large study, height was unrelated to bladder cancer, whereas overweight was associated with a slightly higher bladder cancer risk in men. This association may, however, be distorted by residual confounding by smoking.
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Contact with ruminants is associated with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma risk.
Int. J. Cancer
PUBLISHED: 03-08-2014
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The etiology of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) in the high risk area of northern Iran is only partially known. We aimed to investigate prolonged animal contact as a risk factor for ESCC in this population. From 2003 to 2007, we administered a validated questionnaire to 300 ESCC cases and 571 randomly selected controls matched for neighborhood of residence, age (±2 years) and sex. Questions on lifelong exposure to equines, ruminants, canines, and poultry, including duration and level of contact, were asked in a face-to-face interviews. Conditional logistic regression models were used to calculate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) adjusted for potential confounders. A total of 94.7% of cases and 68.7% of controls reported lifelong history of contact with ruminants. After controlling for potential confounders, contact with ruminants was associated with an eightfold increase (95% CI: 3.92-14.86) in risk of ESCC, and increments in duration of contact raised the risk estimates in a dose-dependent manner. Contact with equines and poultry did not significantly change associated OR for ESCC risk and contact with ruminants. OR (95% CI) for contact with canines was 1.99 (1.35-2.93) which after exclusion of contact with ruminants was not significant (OR for contact only with canine: 3.18, 95% CI: 0.73-13.17). These results add to the evidence that contact with ruminants may increase the risk of ESCC.
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Risk factors for cancers of unknown primary site: Results from the prospective EPIC cohort.
Int. J. Cancer
PUBLISHED: 03-04-2014
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Cancer of unknown primary site (CUP) may be called an "orphan" disease, as it is diagnosed when metastases are detected while the primary tumor typically remains undetected, and because little research has been done on its primary causes. So far, few epidemiological studies, if any, have addressed possible risk factors for CUP. We analyzed data from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort (N=476,940). During prospective follow-up, a total of 651 cases of incident cases of CUP were detected (ICD-O-2 code C809). Proportional hazards models were conducted to examine the associations of lifetime history of smoking habits, alcohol consumption, levels of education and anthropometric indices of adiposity with risk of being diagnosed with CUP. Risk of being diagnosed with CUP was strongly related to smoking, with a relative risk of 3.66 [95% C.I., 2.24-5.97] for current, heavy smokers (26+ cigarettes/day) compared to never smokers (adjusted for alcohol consumption, body mass index, waist circumference and level of education) and a relative risk of 5.12 [3.09-8.47] for cases with CUP who died within 12 months. For alcohol consumption and level of education, weaker associations were observed but attenuated and no longer statistically significant after adjusting for smoking and indices of obesity. Finally, risk of CUP was increased by approximately 30 per cent for subjects in the highest versus lowest quartiles of waist circumference. Our analyses provide further documentation, in addition to autopsy studies, that a substantial proportion of cancers of unknown primary site may have their origin in smoking-related tumors, in particular.
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Prediagnostic serum levels of inflammatory biomarkers are correlated with future development of lung and esophageal cancer.
Cancer Sci.
PUBLISHED: 02-21-2014
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This study tests the hypothesis that prediagnostic serum levels of 20 cancer-associated inflammatory biomarkers correlate directly with future development of head and neck, esophageal, and lung cancers in a high-risk prospective cohort. This is a nested case-control pilot study of subjects enrolled in the Golestan Cohort Study, an ongoing epidemiologic project assessing cancer trends in Golestan, Iran. We measured a panel of 20 21 cytokines, chemokines, and inflammatory molecules using Luminex technology in serum samples collected 2 or more years before cancer diagnosis in 78 aerodigestive cancer cases and 81 controls. Data was analyzed using Wilcoxon rank sum test, odds ratios, receiver operating characteristic areas of discrimination, and multivariate analysis. Biomarkers were profoundly and globally elevated in future esophageal and lung cancer patients compared to controls. Odds ratios were significant for association between several biomarkers and future development of esophageal cancer, including interleukin-1R? (IL-1Ra; 35.9), interferon ?2 (IFN-a2; 34.0), fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2; 17.4), and granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF; 17.4). The same pattern was observed among future lung cancer cases for G-CSF (27.7), GM-CSF (13.3), and tumor necrosis factor-? (TNF-a; 8.6). By contrast, the majority of biomarkers studied showed no significant correlation with future head and neck cancer development. This study provides the first direct evidence that multiple inflammatory biomarkers are coordinately elevated in future lung and esophageal cancer patients 2 or more years before cancer diagnosis.
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Estimating and explaining the effect of education and income on head and neck cancer risk: INHANCE consortium pooled analysis of 31 case-control studies from 27 countries.
Int. J. Cancer
PUBLISHED: 02-21-2014
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Low socioeconomic status has been reported to be associated with head and neck cancer risk. However, previous studies have been too small to examine the associations by cancer subsite, age, sex, global region and calendar time and to explain the association in terms of behavioral risk factors. Individual participant data of 23,964 cases with head and neck cancer and 31,954 controls from 31 studies in 27 countries pooled with random effects models. Overall, low education was associated with an increased risk of head and neck cancer (OR = 2.50; 95% CI = 2.02 - 3.09). Overall one-third of the increased risk was not explained by differences in the distribution of cigarette smoking and alcohol behaviors; and it remained elevated among never users of tobacco and nondrinkers (OR = 1.61; 95% CI = 1.13 - 2.31). More of the estimated education effect was not explained by cigarette smoking and alcohol behaviors: in women than in men, in older than younger groups, in the oropharynx than in other sites, in South/Central America than in Europe/North America and was strongest in countries with greater income inequality. Similar findings were observed for the estimated effect of low versus high household income. The lowest levels of income and educational attainment were associated with more than 2-fold increased risk of head and neck cancer, which is not entirely explained by differences in the distributions of behavioral risk factors for these cancers and which varies across cancer sites, sexes, countries and country income inequality levels.
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A novel Cdk9 inhibitor preferentially targets tumor cells and synergizes with fludarabine.
Oncotarget
PUBLISHED: 02-06-2014
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Cdk9 is a key elongation factor for RNA transcription and functions by phosphorylating the C-terminal domain of RNA polymerase II. Here we present direct evidence that cdk9 is important for cancer cell survival and describe the characterization of the potent cdk9 inhibitor CDKI-73 in primary human leukemia cells. CDKI-73 induced caspase-dependent apoptosis that was preceded by dephosphorylation of cdk9 and serine 2 of RNA polymerase II. CDKI-73 was more potent than the pan-cdk inhibitor flavopiridol and showed >200-fold selectivity against primary leukemia cells when compared with normal CD34+ cells. Furthermore, CDKI-73 was equipotent in poor prognostic sub-groups of leukemia patients and showed cytotoxic synergy with the nucleoside analog fludarabine. The Mechanism of synergy was associated with CDKI-73-mediated transcriptional inhibition of MCL1 and XIAP that was maintained when used in combination with fludarabine. Our data present a strong rationale for the development of cdk9 inhibitors such as CDKI-73 as anticancer therapeutics.
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Impact of body size and physical activity during adolescence and adult life on overall and cause-specific mortality in a large cohort study from Iran.
Eur. J. Epidemiol.
PUBLISHED: 02-03-2014
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We conducted this study to examine life-course body size and physical activity in relation to total and cause-specific mortality, which has not previously been studied in the low and middle-income countries in Asia. The Golestan Cohort Study is a population-based cohort in northeastern Iran in which 50,045 people above the age of 40 have been followed since 2004. Participants were shown a validated pictogram to assess body size at ages 15, 30, and the time of recruitment. Information on occupational physical activity at these ages was also collected. Subjects were followed up annually, and cause of death was determined. Cox regression models were adjusted for age at cohort start, smoking, socioeconomic status, ethnicity, place of residence, education, and opium use. Models for body size were also adjusted for physical activity at the same age, and vice versa. During a total of 252,740 person-years of follow-up (mean follow-up duration 5.1 ± 1.3 years) through December 2011, 2,529 of the cohort participants died. Larger body sizes at ages 15 or 30 in both sexes were associated with increased overall mortality. Cancer mortality was more strongly associated with adolescent obesity, and cardiovascular mortality with early adulthood body size. Weight gain between these ages was associated with cardiovascular mortality. Obese adolescents who lost weight still had increased mortality from all medical causes in both sexes. Physical activity during adolescence and early adulthood had no association with mortality, but at cohort baseline higher levels of activity were associated with reduced mortality. Mortality in this Middle-Eastern population was associated with obesity both during adolescence and early adult life.
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Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease and overall and Cause-specific Mortality: A Prospective Study of 50000 Individuals.
Middle East J Dig Dis
PUBLISHED: 02-02-2014
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BACKGROUND Only a few studies in Western countries have investigated the association between gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and mortality at the general population level and they have shown mixed results. This study investigated the association between GERD symptoms and overall and cause-specific mortality in a large prospective population-based study in Golestan Province, Iran. METHODS Baseline data on frequency, onset time, and patient-perceived severity of GERD symptoms were available for 50001 participants in the Golestan Cohort Study (GCS). We identified 3107 deaths (including 1146 circulatory and 470 cancer-related) with an average follow-up of 6.4 years and calculated hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) adjusted for multiple potential confounders. RESULTS Severe daily symptoms (defined as symptoms interfering with daily work or causing nighttime awakenings on a daily bases, reported by 4.3% of participants) were associated with cancer mortality (HR 1.48, 95% CI: 1.04-2.05). This increase was too small to noticeably affect overall mortality. Mortality was not associated with onset time or frequency of GERD and was not increased with mild to moderate symptoms. CONCLUSION We have observed an association with GERD and increased cancer mortality in a small group of individuals that had severe symptoms. Most patients with mild to moderate GERD can be re-assured that their symptoms are not associated with increased mortality.
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Imaging of adult ocular and orbital pathology--a pictorial review.
J Radiol Case Rep
PUBLISHED: 02-01-2014
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Orbital pathology often presents a diagnostic challenge to the reporting radiologist. The aetiology is protean, and clinical input is therefore often necessary to narrow the differential diagnosis. With this manuscript, we provide a pictorial review of adult ocular and orbital pathology.
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Alcohol and mortality in Russia: prospective observational study of 151,000 adults.
Lancet
PUBLISHED: 01-31-2014
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Russian adults have extraordinarily high rates of premature death. Retrospective enquiries to the families of about 50,000 deceased Russians had found excess vodka use among those dying from external causes (accident, suicide, violence) and eight particular disease groupings. We now seek prospective evidence of these associations.
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Exposure to secondhand tobacco smoke and lung cancer by histological type: a pooled analysis of the International Lung Cancer Consortium (ILCCO).
Int. J. Cancer
PUBLISHED: 01-30-2014
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While the association between exposure to secondhand smoke and lung cancer risk is well established, few studies with sufficient power have examined the association by histological type. In this study, we evaluated the secondhand smoke-lung cancer relationship by histological type based on pooled data from 18 case-control studies in the International Lung Cancer Consortium (ILCCO), including 2,504 cases and 7,276 control who were never smokers and 10,184 cases and 7,176 controls who were ever smokers. We used multivariable logistic regression, adjusting for age, sex, race/ethnicity, smoking status, pack-years of smoking, and study. Among never smokers, the odds ratios (OR) comparing those ever exposed to secondhand smoke with those never exposed were 1.31 (95% CI: 1.17-1.45) for all histological types combined, 1.26 (95% CI: 1.10-1.44) for adenocarcinoma, 1.41 (95% CI: 0.99-1.99) for squamous cell carcinoma, 1.48 (95% CI: 0.89-2.45) for large cell lung cancer, and 3.09 (95% CI: 1.62-5.89) for small cell lung cancer. The estimated association with secondhand smoke exposure was greater for small cell lung cancer than for nonsmall cell lung cancers (OR=2.11, 95% CI: 1.11-4.04). This analysis is the largest to date investigating the relation between exposure to secondhand smoke and lung cancer. Our study provides more precise estimates of the impact of secondhand smoke on the major histological types of lung cancer, indicates the association with secondhand smoke is stronger for small cell lung cancer than for the other histological types, and suggests the importance of intervention against exposure to secondhand smoke in lung cancer prevention.
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A prospective study of one-carbon metabolism biomarkers and cancer of the head and neck and esophagus.
Int. J. Cancer
PUBLISHED: 01-29-2014
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Experimental and epidemiological data suggest that factors of one-carbon metabolism are important in the pathogenesis of several cancers, but prospective data on head and neck cancer (HNC) and esophagus cancer are limited. The European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study recruited 385,747 participants from 10 countries who donated a blood sample. The current study included 516 cancer cases of the head and neck and esophagus and 516 individually matched controls. Plasma levels of vitamins B2, B6, B9 (folate), B12, and methionine and homocysteine were measured in pre-diagnostic plasma samples and analyzed in relation to HNC and esophagus cancer risk, as well as post-diagnosis all-cause mortality. After controlling for risk factors, study participants with higher levels of homocysteine had elevated risk of HNC, the odds ratio (OR) in conditional analysis when comparing the top and bottom quartiles of homocysteine [ORQ4 vs. Q1 ] being 2.13 (95% confidence interval [95% CI] 1.13-4.00, p for trend 0.009). A slight decrease in HNC risk was also seen among subjects with higher levels of folate (ORQ4 vs. Q1 0.63, 95% CI 0.35-1.16, p for trend 0.02). Subgroup analyses by anatomical sub-site indicated particularly strong associations with circulating homocysteine for oral cavity and gum cancer (p for trend 8 × 10(-4) ), as well as for oropharynx cancer (p for trend 0.008). Plasma concentrations of the other investigated biomarkers did not display any clear association with risk or survival. In conclusion, study participants with elevated circulating levels of homocysteine had increased risk of developing squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck.
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Genome-wide association study reveals two new risk loci for bipolar disorder.
Nat Commun
PUBLISHED: 01-29-2014
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Bipolar disorder (BD) is a common and highly heritable mental illness and genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have robustly identified the first common genetic variants involved in disease aetiology. The data also provide strong evidence for the presence of multiple additional risk loci, each contributing a relatively small effect to BD susceptibility. Large samples are necessary to detect these risk loci. Here we present results from the largest BD GWAS to date by investigating 2.3 million single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in a sample of 24,025 patients and controls. We detect 56 genome-wide significant SNPs in five chromosomal regions including previously reported risk loci ANK3, ODZ4 and TRANK1, as well as the risk locus ADCY2 (5p15.31) and a region between MIR2113 and POU3F2 (6q16.1). ADCY2 is a key enzyme in cAMP signalling and our finding provides new insights into the biological mechanisms involved in the development of BD.
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Genetic association of gastric cancer with miRNA clusters including the cancer-related genes MIR29, MIR25, MIR93 and MIR106: results from the EPIC-EURGAST study.
Int. J. Cancer
PUBLISHED: 01-24-2014
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MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are post-transcriptional gene regulators involved in a wide range of biological processes including tumorigenesis. Deregulation of miRNA pathways has been associated with cancer but the contribution of their genetic variability to this disorder is poorly known. We analyzed the genetic association of gastric cancer (GC) and its anatomical and histological subtypes, with 133 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) tagging 15 isolated miRNAs and 24 miRNA clusters potentially involved in cancer, in 365 GC cases and 1,284 matched controls within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition cohort. Various SNPs were associated with GC under the log-additive model. Furthermore, several of these miRNAs passed the gene-based permutation test when analyzed according to GC subtypes: three tagSNPs of the miR-29a/miR-29b-1 cluster were associated with diffuse subtype (minimum p-value?=?1.7 × 10(-4) ; odds ratio, OR?=?1.72; 95% confidence interval, CI?=?1.30-2.28), two tagSNPs of the miR-25/miR-93/miR-106b cluster were associated with cardia GC (minimum p-value?=?5.38 × 10(-3) ; OR?=?0.56, 95% CI?=?0.37-0.86) and one tagSNP of the miR-363/miR-92a-2/miR-19b-2/miR-20b/miR-18b/miR-106a cluster was associated with noncardia GC (minimum p-value?=?5.40 × 10(-3) ; OR?=?1.41, 95% CI?=?1.12-1.78). Some functionally validated target genes of these miRNAs are implicated in cancer-related processes such as methylation (DNMT3A, DNMT3B), cell cycle (E2F1, CDKN1A, CDKN1C), apoptosis (BCL2L11, MCL1), angiogenesis (VEGFA) and progression (PIK3R1, MYCN). Furthermore, we identified genetic interactions between variants tagging these miRNAs and variants in their validated target genes. Deregulation of the expression of these miRNAs in GC also supports our findings, altogether suggesting for the fist time that genetic variation in MIR29, MIR25, MIR93 and MIR106b may have a critical role in genetic susceptibility to GC and could contribute to the molecular mechanisms of gastric carcinogenesis.
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Prediagnostic telomere length and risk of B-cell lymphoma-Results from the EPIC cohort study.
Int. J. Cancer
PUBLISHED: 01-17-2014
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Recent epidemiological investigations have reported on the association between telomere length (TL) and a number of malignancies, including B-cell lymphoma (BCL). The reported results for BCLs are however inconsistent. We carried out a nested case-control study to determine whether TL is associated with future risk of BCL. Using quantitative polymerase chain reaction, the relative TL (i.e. the ratio of telomere repeat copy number to single gene copy number) was measured in mononuclear cell DNA of prediagnostic peripheral blood samples of 464 lymphoma cases and 464 matched controls (median time between blood collection and diagnosis, 4.6 years). Conditional logistic regression was used to analyze the association between TL and the risk of developing lymphoma and histologic subtypes. TL was significantly longer in cases compared to controls (p = 0.01). Multivariable models showed a significantly increased risk of BCL [odds ratio (OR) = 1.66, 1.80 and 3.20 for quartiles 2-4, respectively, p-trend = 0.001], diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) (OR = 1.20, 2.48 and 2.36 for quartiles 2-4, respectively, p-trend = 0.03) and follicular lymphoma (FL) (OR = 1.39, 1.90 and 2.69 for quartiles 2-4, respectively, p-trend = 0.02) with increasing TL. This study suggests an association between longer leucocyte TL and increased risk of BCL which was most pronounced for DLBCL and FL.
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Physical activity and risk of pancreatic cancer in a central European multicenter case-control study.
Cancer Causes Control
PUBLISHED: 01-07-2014
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Findings from epidemiological studies examining physical activity in relation to pancreatic cancer risk have suggested decreased risks for physical activity; however, the results are inconsistent.
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Outcome prediction in acute stroke patients considered for endovascular treatment: a novel tool.
Interv Neuroradiol
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2014
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Functional outcome following emergent intra-arterial thrombectomy is variable and likely reflects the heterogeneous characteristics of acute stroke patients. The aims of our study were (1) to study which pre-treatment variables correlate with functional outcome and (2) to devise a tool which would reliably predict outcome. Prospective data of patients treated with intra-arterial mechanical thrombectomy in our institution between 2010 and 2012 were collected. A preliminary univariate analysis of baseline variables was performed and data outliers were identified by constructing scatter and box plots. Systematic bivariate analysis was then carried out using a linear regression model and the individual contributing weights of the variables to outcome calculated. The B and constant values from the regression were used to construct a predictive formula. Fifty-seven patients, 35 males (61.4%) and 22 females (38.6%) with a mean age of 62.3 years (range 26-87) were included in the cohort. Statistical correlations of baseline variables and functional outcome showed that age, National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale at presentation and CT leptomeningeal collaterals were strongly correlated (p<0.01), and were later included in the linear regression model. A tool was devised from the regression formula combining weighted inputs of the three variables. Regression statistics and residual analysis were then performed to assess the accuracy and reliability of the proposed tool. The proposed tool is easy to use and reliably predicts functional outcome prior to endovascular therapy. It may help clinical decision-making in the acute setting and offers 'tailor-made' outcome expectations.
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Determinants of gastroesophageal reflux disease, including hookah smoking and opium use- a cross-sectional analysis of 50,000 individuals.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2014
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Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a common cause of discomfort and morbidity worldwide. However, information on determinants of GERD from large-scale studies in low- to medium-income countries is limited. We investigated the factors associated with different measures of GERD symptoms, including frequency, patient-perceived severity, and onset time.
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Genetic variants in nicotine addiction and alcohol metabolism genes, oral cancer risk and the propensity to smoke and drink alcohol: a replication study in India.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2014
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Genetic variants in nicotinic acetylcholine receptor and alcohol metabolism genes have been associated with propensity to smoke tobacco and drink alcohol, respectively, and also implicated in genetic susceptibility to head and neck cancer. In addition to smoking and alcohol, tobacco chewing is an important oral cancer risk factor in India. It is not known if these genetic variants influence propensity or oral cancer susceptibility in the context of this distinct etiology.
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Exposure to UV radiation and risk of Hodgkin lymphoma: a pooled analysis.
Blood
PUBLISHED: 09-09-2013
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Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) exposure has been inversely associated with Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) risk, but only inconsistently, only in a few studies, and without attention to HL heterogeneity. We conducted a pooled analysis of HL risk focusing on type and timing of UVR exposure and on disease subtypes by age, histology, and tumor-cell Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) status. Four case-control studies contributed 1320 HL cases and 6381 controls. We estimated lifetime, adulthood, and childhood UVR exposure and history of sunburn and sunlamp use. We used 2-stage estimation with mixed-effects models and weighted pooled effect estimates by inverse marginal variances. We observed statistically significant inverse associations with HL risk for UVR exposures during childhood and adulthood, sunburn history, and sunlamp use, but we found no significant dose-response relationships. Risks were significant only for EBV-positive HL (pooled odds ratio, 0.56; 95% confidence interval, 0.35 to 0.91 for the highest overall UVR exposure category), with a significant linear trend for overall exposure (P = .03). Pooled relative risk estimates were not heterogeneous across studies. Increased UVR exposure may protect against HL, particularly EBV-positive HL. Plausible mechanisms involving UVR induction of regulatory T cells or the cellular DNA damage response suggest opportunities for new prevention targets.
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Fine-Scale Mapping of the FGFR2 Breast Cancer Risk Locus: Putative Functional Variants Differentially Bind FOXA1 and E2F1.
Kerstin B Meyer, Martin O'Reilly, Kyriaki Michailidou, Saskia Carlebur, Stacey L Edwards, Juliet D French, Radhika Prathalingham, Joe Dennis, Manjeet K Bolla, Qin Wang, Ines de Santiago, John L Hopper, Helen Tsimiklis, Carmel Apicella, Melissa C Southey, Marjanka K Schmidt, Annegien Broeks, Laura J van 't Veer, Frans B Hogervorst, Kenneth Muir, Artitaya Lophatananon, Sarah Stewart-Brown, Pornthep Siriwanarangsan, Peter A Fasching, Michael P Lux, Arif B Ekici, Matthias W Beckmann, Julian Peto, Isabel Dos Santos Silva, Olivia Fletcher, Nichola Johnson, Elinor J Sawyer, Ian Tomlinson, Michael J Kerin, Nicola Miller, Federick Marme, Andreas Schneeweiss, Christof Sohn, Barbara Burwinkel, Pascal Guénel, Thérèse Truong, Pierre Laurent-Puig, Florence Menegaux, Stig E Bojesen, Børge G Nordestgaard, Sune F Nielsen, Henrik Flyger, Roger L Milne, M Pilar Zamora, Jose I Arias, Javier Benitez, Susan Neuhausen, Hoda Anton-Culver, Argyrios Ziogas, Christina C Dur, Hermann Brenner, Heiko Muller, Volker Arndt, Christa Stegmaier, Alfons Meindl, Rita K Schmutzler, Christoph Engel, Nina Ditsch, Hiltrud Brauch, Thomas Brüning, Yon-Dschun Ko, , Heli Nevanlinna, Taru A Muranen, Kristiina Aittomäki, Carl Blomqvist, Keitaro Matsuo, Hidemi Ito, Hiroji Iwata, Yasushi Yatabe, Thilo Dörk, Sonja Helbig, Natalia V Bogdanova, Annika Lindblom, Sara Margolin, Arto Mannermaa, Vesa Kataja, Veli-Matti Kosma, Jaana M Hartikainen, Georgia Chenevix-Trench, Anna H Wu, Chiu-Chen Tseng, David Van Den Berg, Daniel O Stram, Diether Lambrechts, Bernard Thienpont, Marie-Rose Christiaens, Ann Smeets, Jenny Chang-Claude, Anja Rudolph, Petra Seibold, Dieter Flesch-Janys, Paolo Radice, Paolo Peterlongo, Bernardo Bonanni, Loris Bernard, Fergus J Couch, Janet E Olson, Xianshu Wang, Kristen Purrington, Graham G Giles, Gianluca Severi, Laura Baglietto, Catriona McLean, Christopher A Haiman, Brian E Henderson, Fredrick Schumacher, Loic Le Marchand, Jacques Simard, Mark S Goldberg, France Labrèche, Martine Dumont, Soo-Hwang Teo, Cheng-Har Yip, Sze-Yee Phuah, Vessela Kristensen, Grethe Grenaker Alnæs, Anne-Lise Børresen-Dale, Wei Zheng, Sandra Deming-Halverson, Martha Shrubsole, Jirong Long, Robert Winqvist, Katri Pylkäs, Arja Jukkola-Vuorinen, Saila Kauppila, Irene L Andrulis, Julia A Knight, Gord Glendon, Sandrine Tchatchou, Peter Devilee, Robert A E M Tollenaar, Caroline M Seynaeve, Montserrat Garcia-Closas, Jonine Figueroa, Stephen J Chanock, Jolanta Lissowska, Kamila Czene, Hartef Darabi, Kimael Eriksson, Maartje J Hooning, John W M Martens, Ans M W van den Ouweland, Carolien H M van Deurzen, Per Hall, Jingmei Li, Jianjun Liu, Keith Humphreys, Xiao-Ou Shu, Wei Lu, Yu-Tang Gao, Hui Cai, Angela Cox, Malcolm W R Reed, William Blot, Lisa B Signorello, Qiuyin Cai, Paul D P Pharoah, Maya Ghoussaini, Patricia Harrington, Jonathan Tyrer, Daehee Kang, Ji-Yeob Choi, Sue K Park, Dong-Young Noh, Mikael Hartman, Miao Hui, Wei-Yen Lim, Shaik A Buhari, Ute Hamann, Asta Försti, Thomas Rüdiger, Hans-Ulrich Ulmer, Anna Jakubowska, Jan Lubiński, Katarzyna Jaworska, Katarzyna Durda, Suleeporn Sangrajrang, Valerie Gaborieau, Paul Brennan, James McKay, Celine Vachon, Susan Slager, Florentia Fostira, Robert Pilarski, Chen-Yang Shen, Chia-Ni Hsiung, Pei-Ei Wu, Ming-Feng Hou, Anthony Swerdlow, Alan Ashworth, Nick Orr, Minouk J Schoemaker, Bruce A J Ponder, Alison M Dunning, Douglas F Easton.
Am. J. Hum. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 08-01-2013
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The 10q26 locus in the second intron of FGFR2 is the locus most strongly associated with estrogen-receptor-positive breast cancer in genome-wide association studies. We conducted fine-scale mapping in case-control studies genotyped with a custom chip (iCOGS), comprising 41 studies (n = 89,050) of European ancestry, 9 Asian ancestry studies (n = 13,983), and 2 African ancestry studies (n = 2,028) from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium. We identified three statistically independent risk signals within the locus. Within risk signals 1 and 3, genetic analysis identified five and two variants, respectively, highly correlated with the most strongly associated SNPs. By using a combination of genetic fine mapping, data on DNase hypersensitivity, and electrophoretic mobility shift assays to study protein-DNA binding, we identified rs35054928, rs2981578, and rs45631563 as putative functional SNPs. Chromatin immunoprecipitation showed that FOXA1 preferentially bound to the risk-associated allele (C) of rs2981578 and was able to recruit ER? to this site in an allele-specific manner, whereas E2F1 preferentially bound the risk variant of rs35054928. The risk alleles were preferentially found in open chromatin and bound by Ser5 phosphorylated RNA polymerase II, suggesting that the risk alleles are associated with changes in transcription. Chromatin conformation capture demonstrated that the risk region was able to interact with the promoter of FGFR2, the likely target gene of this risk region. A role for FOXA1 in mediating breast cancer susceptibility at this locus is consistent with the finding that the FGFR2 risk locus primarily predisposes to estrogen-receptor-positive disease.
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Cigarette, cigar, and pipe smoking and the risk of head and neck cancers: pooled analysis in the International Head and Neck Cancer Epidemiology Consortium.
Am. J. Epidemiol.
PUBLISHED: 06-30-2013
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Cigar and pipe smoking are considered risk factors for head and neck cancers, but the magnitude of effect estimates for these products has been imprecisely estimated. By using pooled data from the International Head and Neck Cancer Epidemiology (INHANCE) Consortium (comprising 13,935 cases and 18,691 controls in 19 studies from 1981 to 2007), we applied hierarchical logistic regression to more precisely estimate odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals for cigarette, cigar, and pipe smoking separately, compared with reference groups of those who had never smoked each single product. Odds ratios for cigar and pipe smoking were stratified by ever cigarette smoking. We also considered effect estimates of smoking a single product exclusively versus never having smoked any product (reference group). Among never cigarette smokers, the odds ratio for ever cigar smoking was 2.54 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.93, 3.34), and the odds ratio for ever pipe smoking was 2.08 (95% CI: 1.55, 2.81). These odds ratios increased with increasing frequency and duration of smoking (Ptrend ? 0.0001). Odds ratios for cigar and pipe smoking were not elevated among ever cigarette smokers. Head and neck cancer risk was elevated for those who reported exclusive cigar smoking (odds ratio = 3.49, 95% CI: 2.58, 4.73) or exclusive pipe smoking (odds ratio = 3.71, 95% CI: 2.59, 5.33). These results suggest that cigar and pipe smoking are independently associated with increased risk of head and neck cancers.
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Blinatumomab induces autologous T-cell killing of chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells.
Haematologica
PUBLISHED: 06-28-2013
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Chronic lymphocytic leukemia is an incurable B-cell malignancy that is associated with tumor cell-mediated T-cell dysfunction. It therefore represents a challenging disease for T-cell immunotherapeutics. The CD19/CD3 bi-specific antibody construct blinatumomab (AMG103 or MT103) has been tested clinically in non-Hodgkins lymphoma and acute lymphoblastic leukemia but has not been assessed in chronic lymphocytic leukemia. We investigated whether blinatumomab could overcome T-cell dysfunction in chronic lymphocytic leukemia in vitro. Blinatumomab was tested on peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 28 patients (treatment naïve and previously treated). T-cell activation and function, as well as cytotoxicity against leukemic tumor cells were measured. Blinatumomab induced T-cell activation, proliferation, cytokine secretion and granzyme B release in a manner similar to that occurring with stimulation with anti-CD3/anti-CD28 beads. However, only blinatumomab was able to induce tumor cell death and this was found to require blinatumomab-mediated conjugate formation between T cells and tumor cells. Cytotoxicity of tumor cells was observed at very low T-cell:tumor cell ratios. A three-dimensional model based on confocal microscopy suggested that up to 11 tumor cells could cluster round each T cell. Importantly, blinatumomab induced cytotoxicity against tumor cells in samples from both treatment-naïve and treated patients, and in the presence of co-culture pro-survival signals. The potent cytotoxic action of blinatumomab on tumor cells appears to involve conjugation of T cells with tumor cells at both the activation and effector stages. The efficacy of blinatumomab in vitro suggests that the bi-specific antibody approach may be a powerful immunotherapeutic strategy in chronic lymphocytic leukemia.
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Herpes simplex virus encephalitis involving the right thalamus.
BMJ Case Rep
PUBLISHED: 06-21-2013
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Herpes simplex virus (HSV) encephalitis is a rare but often fatal disease if left untreated. A 50-year-old woman was admitted with lethargy, confusion, dysphasia and cough. MRI brain demonstrated bilateral temporal and perisylvian hyperintense signal abnormality extending into the cingulate gyrus, typical of HSV encephalitis. However, there was also signal abnormality involving the right thalamus, indicating thalamic involvement. EEG and cerebrospinal fluid PCR confirmed HSV encephalitis. The patient was started on intravenous acyclovir resulting in marked improvement. Adequate assessment and prompt treatment of HSV encephalitis will aid in achieving adequate recovery. Radiological investigation plays a crucial role in diagnosis with typical MR features a useful aid to diagnosis. HSV encephalitis classically involves the medial temporal lobes, insula and cingulated gyri. The basal ganglia and thalami are nearly always spared. We present a very rare case of HSV encephalitis which involved the right thalamus.
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Opium use and risk of mortality from digestive diseases: a prospective cohort study.
Am. J. Gastroenterol.
PUBLISHED: 05-29-2013
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Opium use, particularly in low doses, is a common practice among adults in northeastern Iran. We aimed to investigate the association between opium use and subsequent mortality from disorders of the digestive tract.
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Fragment-based hit identification: thinking in 3D.
Drug Discov. Today
PUBLISHED: 05-16-2013
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The identification of high-quality hits during the early phases of drug discovery is essential if projects are to have a realistic chance of progressing into clinical development and delivering marketed drugs. As the pharmaceutical industry goes through unprecedented change, there are increasing opportunities to collaborate via pre-competitive networks to marshal multifunctional resources and knowledge to drive impactful, innovative science. The 3D Fragment Consortium is developing fragment-screening libraries with enhanced 3D characteristics and evaluating their effect on the quality of fragment-based hit identification (FBHI) projects.
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Prevalence, awareness and risk factors of hypertension in a large cohort of Iranian adult population.
J. Hypertens.
PUBLISHED: 05-16-2013
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There is considerable variation in hypertension prevalence and awareness, and their correlates, across different geographic locations and ethnic groups. We performed this cross-sectional analysis on data from the Golestan Cohort Study (GCS).
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Teaching NeuroImages: hemorrhagic cavernoma with secondary development of hypertrophic olivary degeneration.
Neurology
PUBLISHED: 05-08-2013
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Hypertrophic olivary degeneration (HOD) is secondary degeneration of the inferior olivary nucleus (ION) due to a primary lesion in the dento-rubro-olivary pathway. This pathway is known as the Guillain and Mollert triangle, containing the dentate nucleus and the contralateral red and inferior olivary nuclei (figure e-1 on the Neurology® Web site at www.neurology.org). The commonest presenting symptom is palatal myoclonus occurring 8-12 months after the primary insult. MRI of the ION initially has normal results (figure 1). Three phases of HOD exist on MRI: hyperintense signal change without hypertrophy, hyperintense signal change with hypertrophy (figure 2), and regression of hypertrophy with persistent hyperintense signal.(1.)
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Genome-wide association study identifies multiple risk loci for chronic lymphocytic leukemia.
Sonja I Berndt, Christine F Skibola, Vijai Joseph, Nicola J Camp, Alexandra Nieters, Zhaoming Wang, Wendy Cozen, Alain Monnereau, Sophia S Wang, Rachel S Kelly, Qing Lan, Lauren R Teras, Nilanjan Chatterjee, Charles C Chung, Meredith Yeager, Angela R Brooks-Wilson, Patricia Hartge, Mark P Purdue, Brenda M Birmann, Bruce K Armstrong, Pierluigi Cocco, Yawei Zhang, Gianluca Severi, Anne Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Charles Lawrence, Laurie Burdette, Jeffrey Yuenger, Amy Hutchinson, Kevin B Jacobs, Timothy G Call, Tait D Shanafelt, Anne J Novak, Neil E Kay, Mark Liebow, Alice H Wang, Karin E Smedby, Hans-Olov Adami, Mads Melbye, Bengt Glimelius, Ellen T Chang, Martha Glenn, Karen Curtin, Lisa A Cannon-Albright, Brandt Jones, W Ryan Diver, Brian K Link, George J Weiner, Lucia Conde, Paige M Bracci, Jacques Riby, Elizabeth A Holly, Martyn T Smith, Rebecca D Jackson, Lesley F Tinker, Yolanda Benavente, Nikolaus Becker, Paolo Boffetta, Paul Brennan, Lenka Foretova, Marc Maynadié, James McKay, Anthony Staines, Kari G Rabe, Sara J Achenbach, Celine M Vachon, Lynn R Goldin, Sara S Strom, Mark C Lanasa, Logan G Spector, Jose F Leis, Julie M Cunningham, J Brice Weinberg, Vicki A Morrison, Neil E Caporaso, Aaron D Norman, Martha S Linet, Anneclaire J De Roos, Lindsay M Morton, Richard K Severson, Elio Riboli, Paolo Vineis, Rudolph Kaaks, Dimitrios Trichopoulos, Giovanna Masala, Elisabete Weiderpass, Maria-Dolores Chirlaque, Roel C H Vermeulen, Ruth C Travis, Graham G Giles, Demetrius Albanes, Jarmo Virtamo, Stephanie Weinstein, Jacqueline Clavel, Tongzhang Zheng, Theodore R Holford, Kenneth Offit, Andrew Zelenetz, Robert J Klein, John J Spinelli, Kimberly A Bertrand, Francine Laden, Edward Giovannucci, Peter Kraft, Anne Kricker, Jenny Turner, Claire M Vajdic, Maria Grazia Ennas, Giovanni M Ferri, Lucia Miligi, Liming Liang, Joshua Sampson, Simon Crouch, Ju-Hyun Park, Kari E North, Angela Cox, John A Snowden, Josh Wright, Angel Carracedo, Carlos Lopez-Otin, Sílvia Beà, Itziar Salaverria, David Martín-Garcia, Elias Campo, Joseph F Fraumeni, Silvia de Sanjosé, Henrik Hjalgrim, James R Cerhan, Stephen J Chanock, Nathaniel Rothman, Susan L Slager.
Nat. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 05-02-2013
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Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have previously identified 13 loci associated with risk of chronic lymphocytic leukemia or small lymphocytic lymphoma (CLL). To identify additional CLL susceptibility loci, we conducted the largest meta-analysis for CLL thus far, including four GWAS with a total of 3,100 individuals with CLL (cases) and 7,667 controls. In the meta-analysis, we identified ten independent associated SNPs in nine new loci at 10q23.31 (ACTA2 or FAS (ACTA2/FAS), P=1.22×10(-14)), 18q21.33 (BCL2, P=7.76×10(-11)), 11p15.5 (C11orf21, P=2.15×10(-10)), 4q25 (LEF1, P=4.24×10(-10)), 2q33.1 (CASP10 or CASP8 (CASP10/CASP8), P=2.50×10(-9)), 9p21.3 (CDKN2B-AS1, P=1.27×10(-8)), 18q21.32 (PMAIP1, P=2.51×10(-8)), 15q15.1 (BMF, P=2.71×10(-10)) and 2p22.2 (QPCT, P=1.68×10(-8)), as well as an independent signal at an established locus (2q13, ACOXL, P=2.08×10(-18)). We also found evidence for two additional promising loci below genome-wide significance at 8q22.3 (ODF1, P=5.40×10(-8)) and 5p15.33 (TERT, P=1.92×10(-7)). Although further studies are required, the proximity of several of these loci to genes involved in apoptosis suggests a plausible underlying biological mechanism.
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Empirical hierarchical bayes approach to gene-environment interactions: development and application to genome-wide association studies of lung cancer in TRICL.
Genet. Epidemiol.
PUBLISHED: 04-15-2013
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The analysis of gene-environment (G × E) interactions remains one of the greatest challenges in the postgenome-wide association studies (GWASs) era. Recent methods constitute a compromise between the robust but underpowered case-control and powerful case-only methods. Inferences of the latter are biased when the assumption of gene-environment (G-E) independence in controls fails. We propose a novel empirical hierarchical Bayes approach to G × E interaction (EHB-GE), which benefits from greater rank power while accounting for population-based G-E correlation. Building on Lewinger et al.s ([2007] Genet Epidemiol 31:871-882) hierarchical Bayes prioritization approach, the method first obtains posterior G-E correlation estimates in controls for each marker, borrowing strength from G-E information across the genome. These posterior estimates are then subtracted from the corresponding case-only G × E estimates. We compared EHB-GE with rival methods using simulation. EHB-GE has similar or greater rank power to detect G × E interactions in the presence of large numbers of G-E correlations with weak to strong effects or only a low number of such correlations with large effect. When there are no or only a few weak G-E correlations, Murcray et al.s method ([2009] Am J Epidemiol 169:219-226) identifies markers with low G × E interaction effects better. We applied EHB-GE and competing methods to four lung cancer case-control GWAS from the Interdisciplinary Research in Cancer of the Lung/International Lung Cancer Consortium with smoking as environmental factor. A number of genes worth investigating were identified by the EHB-GE approach.
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Juvenile idiopathic arthritis, mitral valve prolapse and a familial variant involving the integrin-binding fragment of FBN1.
Am. J. Med. Genet. A
PUBLISHED: 04-14-2013
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Mutations in Fibrillin 1 (FBN1) are associated with Marfan syndrome and in some instances with the MASS phenotype (myopia, mitral valve prolapse, borderline non-progressive aortic root dilatation, skeletal features, and striae). Potential confusion over diagnosis and management in patients with borderline features has been addressed through the revised Ghent nosology, which emphasizes the importance of aortic root dilatation and ectopia lentis as features of Marfan syndrome. The overlapping and more common mitral valve prolapse syndrome is precluded by ectopia lentis or aortic dilatation. Among these clinically related conditions, there is no compelling evidence that genotype predicts phenotype, with the exception of neonatal Marfan syndrome, mutations in which cluster within FBN1 exons 24-32. Recent reports also link two very different phenotypes to changes in FBN1. Heterozygous mutations in transforming growth factor ?-binding protein-like domain 5 (TB5) can cause acromicric or geleophysic dysplasias-and mutations in the TB4 domain, which contains an integrin binding RGD loop, have been found in congenital scleroderma/stiff skin syndrome. We report on a variant in an evolutionarily conserved residue that stabilizes the integrin binding fragment of FBN1, associated with juvenile idiopathic arthritis, mitral valve prolapse or apparently normal phenotype in different family members.
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Case-finding in Fabry disease: experience from the North of England.
J. Inherit. Metab. Dis.
PUBLISHED: 03-12-2013
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The advent of effective therapy for Fabry disease (FD) creates two challenges: (1) how do we identify individuals with the condition early in its natural history, and (2) how many people have the condition and require expensive therapy? Between 1981 and 2011, 17 new FD families were referred to the Northern Genetics Service in the North of England, the majority between 2005 and 2001. Since 2009 we have employed biochemical screening in dried blood spots from individuals with high risk phenotypes, such as left ventricular hypertrophy and unexplained renal failure, to identify four of the new index cases; and we have offered comprehensive cascade genetic testing to identify pre-symptomatic and symptomatic cases of FD in their 233 at risk relatives. Overall, this combined approach identified a further 23 symptomatic cases of FD and 38 asymptomatic cases. The uptake of cascade genetic testing in this cohort was 48 %, which is similar to other inherited disorders for which there is an effective intervention. The minimum prevalence of GLA mutation in the North of England population at the end of 2011 was 1 in 40,800 and the prevalence of symptomatic FD was 1 in 64,600. Improved uptake of cascade genetic testing would increase these estimates to a maximum of 1 in 21,800 and 1 in 49,000 respectively. We suggest that any protocol for case identification should consist of targeted biochemical screening and coordinated cascade genetic testing.
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Adult height and head and neck cancer: a pooled analysis within the INHANCE Consortium.
Eur. J. Epidemiol.
PUBLISHED: 02-28-2013
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Several epidemiological studies have shown a positive association between adult height and cancer incidence. The only study conducted among women on mouth and pharynx cancer risk, however, reported an inverse association. This study aims to investigate the association between height and the risk of head and neck cancer (HNC) within a large international consortium of HNC. We analyzed pooled individual-level data from 24 case-control studies participating in the International Head and Neck Cancer Epidemiology Consortium. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95 % confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated separately for men and women for associations between height and HNC risk. Educational level, tobacco smoking, and alcohol consumption were included in all regression models. Stratified analyses by HNC subsites were performed. This project included 17,666 cases and 28,198 controls. We found an inverse association between height and HNC (adjusted OR per 10 cm height = 0.91, 95 % CI 0.86-0.95 for men; adjusted OR = 0.86, 95 % CI 0.79-0.93 for women). In men, the estimated OR did vary by educational level, smoking status, geographic area, and control source. No differences by subsites were detected. Adult height is inversely associated with HNC risk. As height can be considered a marker of childhood illness and low energy intake, the inverse association is consistent with prior studies showing that HNC occur more frequently among deprived individuals. Further studies designed to elucidate the mechanism of such association would be warranted.
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Smoking addiction and the risk of upper-aerodigestive-tract cancer in a multicenter case-control study.
Int. J. Cancer
PUBLISHED: 01-31-2013
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Although previous studies on tobacco and alcohol and the risk of upper-aerodigestive-tract (UADT) cancers have clearly shown dose-response relations with the frequency and duration of tobacco and alcohol, studies on addiction to tobacco smoking itself as a risk factor for UADT cancer have not been published, to our knowledge. The aim of this report is to assess whether smoking addiction is an independent risk factor or a refinement to smoking variables (intensity and duration) for UADT squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) risk in the multicenter case-control study (ARCAGE) in Western Europe. The analyses included 1,586 ever smoking UADT SCC cases and 1,260 ever smoking controls. Addiction was measured by a modified Fagerström score (first cigarette after waking up, difficulty refraining from smoking in places where it is forbidden and cigarettes per day). Adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) for UADT cancers with addiction variables were estimated with unconditional logistic regression. Among current smokers, the participants who smoked their first cigarette within 5 min of waking up were two times more likely to develop UADT SCC than those who smoked 60 min after waking up. Greater tobacco smoking addiction was associated with an increased risk of UADT SCC among current smokers (OR = 3.83, 95% CI: 2.56-5.73 for score of 3-7 vs. 0) but not among former smokers. These results may be consistent with a residual effect of smoking that was not captured by the questionnaire responses (smoking intensity and smoking duration) alone, suggesting addiction a refinement to smoking variables.
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SNP association mapping across the extended major histocompatibility complex and risk of B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia in children.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2013
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The extended major histocompatibility complex (xMHC) is the most gene-dense region of the genome and harbors a disproportionately large number of genes involved in immune function. The postulated role of infection in the causation of childhood B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (BCP-ALL) suggests that the xMHC may make an important contribution to the risk of this disease. We conducted association mapping across an approximately 4 megabase region of the xMHC using a validated panel of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in childhood BCP-ALL cases (n=567) enrolled in the Northern California Childhood Leukemia Study (NCCLS) compared with population controls (n=892). Logistic regression analyses of 1,145 SNPs, adjusted for age, sex, and Hispanic ethnicity indicated potential associations between several SNPs and childhood BCP-ALL. After accounting for multiple comparisons, one of these included a statistically significant increased risk associated with rs9296068 (OR=1.40, 95% CI=1.19-1.66, corrected p=0.036), located in proximity to HLA-DOA. Sliding window haplotype analysis identified an additional locus located in the extended class I region in proximity to TRIM27 tagged by a haplotype comprising rs1237485, rs3118361, and rs2032502 (corrected global p=0.046). Our findings suggest that susceptibility to childhood BCP-ALL is influenced by genetic variation within the xMHC and indicate at least two important regions for future evaluation.
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Heritability of subcortical volumetric traits in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2013
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We aimed to 1) determine if subcortical volume deficits are common to mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) patients and their unaffected siblings 2) assess the suitability of subcortical volumetric traits as endophenotypes for MTLE.
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Asthma and lung cancer risk: a systematic investigation by the International Lung Cancer Consortium.
Carcinogenesis
PUBLISHED: 12-22-2011
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Asthma has been hypothesized to be associated with lung cancer (LC) risk. We conducted a pooled analysis of 16 studies in the International Lung Cancer Consortium (ILCCO) to quantitatively assess this association and compared the results with 36 previously published studies. In total, information from 585?444 individuals was used. Study-specific measures were combined using random effects models. A meta-regression and subgroup meta-analyses were performed to identify sources of heterogeneity. The overall LC relative risk (RR) associated with asthma was 1.28 [95% confidence intervals (CIs) = 1.16-1.41] but with large heterogeneity (I(2) = 73%, P < 0.001) between studies. Among ILCCO studies, an increased risk was found for squamous cell (RR = 1.69, 95%, CI = 1.26-2.26) and for small-cell carcinoma (RR = 1.71, 95% CI = 0.99-2.95) but was weaker for adenocarcinoma (RR = 1.09, 95% CI = 0.88-1.36). The increased LC risk was strongest in the 2 years after asthma diagnosis (RR = 2.13, 95% CI = 1.09-4.17) but subjects diagnosed with asthma over 10 years prior had no or little increased LC risk (RR = 1.10, 95% CI = 0.94-1.30). Because the increased incidence of LC was chiefly observed in small cell and squamous cell lung carcinomas, primarily within 2 years of asthma diagnosis and because the association was weak among never smokers, we conclude that the association may not reflect a causal effect of asthma on the risk of LC.
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Defining the prognosis of early stage chronic lymphocytic leukaemia patients.
Br. J. Haematol.
PUBLISHED: 12-15-2011
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Approximately 70% of chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) patients present with early stage disease, therefore defining which patients will progress and require treatment is a major clinical challenge. Here, we present the largest study of prognostic markers ever carried out in Binet stage A patients (n?=?1154) with a median follow-up of 8?years. We assessed the prognostic impact of lymphocyte doubling time (LDT), immunoglobulin gene (IGHV) mutation status, CD38 expression, ZAP-70 expression and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) cytogenetics with regards to time to first treatment (TTFT) and overall survival (OS). Univariate analysis revealed LDT as the most prognostic parameter for TTFT, with IGHV mutation status most prognostic for OS. CD38 expression, ZAP-70 expression and FISH were also prognostic variables; combinations of these markers increased prognostic power in concordant cases. Multivariate analysis revealed that only LDT, IGHV mutation status, CD38 and age at diagnosis were independent prognostic variables for TTFT and OS. Therefore, IGHV mutation status and CD38 expression have independent prognostic value in early stage CLL and should be performed as part of the routine diagnostic workup. ZAP-70 expression and FISH were not independent prognostic markers in early stage disease and can be omitted at diagnosis but FISH analysis should be undertaken at disease progression to direct treatment strategy.
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The chromosome 2p21 region harbors a complex genetic architecture for association with risk for renal cell carcinoma.
Hum. Mol. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 11-23-2011
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In follow-up of a recent genome-wide association study (GWAS) that identified a locus in chromosome 2p21 associated with risk for renal cell carcinoma (RCC), we conducted a fine mapping analysis of a 120 kb region that includes EPAS1. We genotyped 59 tagged common single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 2278 RCC and 3719 controls of European background and observed a novel signal for rs9679290 [P = 5.75 × 10(-8), per-allele odds ratio (OR) = 1.27, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.17-1.39]. Imputation of common SNPs surrounding rs9679290 using HapMap 3 and 1000 Genomes data yielded two additional signals, rs4953346 (P = 4.09 × 10(-14)) and rs12617313 (P = 7.48 × 10(-12)), both highly correlated with rs9679290 (r(2) > 0.95), but interestingly not correlated with the two SNPs reported in the GWAS: rs11894252 and rs7579899 (r(2) < 0.1 with rs9679290). Genotype analysis of rs12617313 confirmed an association with RCC risk (P = 1.72 × 10(-9), per-allele OR = 1.28, 95% CI: 1.18-1.39) In conclusion, we report that chromosome 2p21 harbors a complex genetic architecture for common RCC risk variants.
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Personal use of hair dyes--increased risk of non-Hodgkins lymphoma in Thailand.
Asian Pac. J. Cancer Prev.
PUBLISHED: 10-31-2011
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The use of hair dyes has been inconsistently associated with an increased risk of lymphomas. To further evaluate this possibility, we examined hair dye use and lymphoma risk in a case-control study in the Thai population. A total of 390 histologically confirmed incident non-Hodgkins lymphoma (NHL) cases and 422 controls were included. Information on hair dye use was obtained through a personal interview together with information on other known risk factors of lymphoma. Analysis was performed using logistic regression; odds ratios (ORs) estimates and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated. Ever use of hair dyes was not associated with an increase risk of NHL both overall (OR=1.1, 95%CI 0.8-1.5) and in women (OR=1.4, 95%CI 0.9-2.3). However, NHL was significantly higher among persons who began using hair dyes before 1980 (OR=2.1, 95%CI 1.0-4.1). An increased risk was also observed among women who reported use of permanent hair dye product (OR=1.8, 95% CI 1.0-3.1). Analyses by NHL subtype showed an increased risk for diffuse large B-cell lymphoma among users of permanent hair dyes (OR=1.6, 95%CI 1.0-2.5) while follicular lymphoma was associated with the use of dark-colored dyes (OR=3.7, 95%CI 1.1-12.8). No association was observed with duration of use, nor total lifetime applications. These results indicate that personal hair dye use may play role in risks of NHL among person who used hair dyes before 1980.
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A genome-wide association study identifies a novel susceptibility locus for renal cell carcinoma on 12p11.23.
Xifeng Wu, Ghislaine Scelo, Mark P Purdue, Nathaniel Rothman, Mattias Johansson, Yuanqing Ye, Zhaoming Wang, Diana Zelenika, Lee E Moore, Christopher G Wood, Egor Prokhortchouk, Valerie Gaborieau, Kevin B Jacobs, Wong-Ho Chow, Jorge R Toro, David Zaridze, Jie Lin, Jan Lubiński, Joanna Trubicka, Neonilia Szeszenia-Dabrowska, Jolanta Lissowska, Peter Rudnai, Eleonóra Fabiánová, Dana Mates, Viorel Jinga, Vladimír Bencko, Alena Slamova, Ivana Holcatova, Marie Navratilova, Vladimir Janout, Paolo Boffetta, Joanne S Colt, Faith G Davis, Kendra L Schwartz, Rosamonde E Banks, Peter J Selby, Patricia Harnden, Christine D Berg, Ann W Hsing, Robert L Grubb, Heiner Boeing, Paolo Vineis, Francoise Clavel-Chapelon, Domenico Palli, Rosario Tumino, Vittorio Krogh, Salvatore Panico, Eric J Duell, José Ramón Quirós, Maria-Jose Sanchez, Carmen Navarro, Eva Ardanaz, Miren Dorronsoro, Kay-Tee Khaw, Naomi E Allen, H Bas Bueno-de-Mesquita, Petra H M Peeters, Dimitrios Trichopoulos, Jakob Linseisen, Börje Ljungberg, Kim Overvad, Anne Tjønneland, Isabelle Romieu, Elio Riboli, Victoria L Stevens, Michael J Thun, W Ryan Diver, Susan M Gapstur, Paul D Pharoah, Douglas F Easton, Demetrius Albanes, Jarmo Virtamo, Lars Vatten, Kristian Hveem, Tony Fletcher, Kvetoslava Koppova, Olivier Cussenot, Géraldine Cancel-Tassin, Simone Benhamou, Michelle A Hildebrandt, Xia Pu, Mario Foglio, Doris Lechner, Amy Hutchinson, Meredith Yeager, Joseph F Fraumeni, Mark Lathrop, Konstantin G Skryabin, James D McKay, Jian Gu, Paul Brennan, Stephen J Chanock.
Hum. Mol. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 10-18-2011
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Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is the most lethal urologic cancer. Only two common susceptibility loci for RCC have been confirmed to date. To identify additional RCC common susceptibility loci, we conducted an independent genome-wide association study (GWAS). We analyzed 533 191 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for association with RCC in 894 cases and 1516 controls of European descent recruited from MD Anderson Cancer Center in the primary scan, and validated the top 500 SNPs in silico in 3772 cases and 8505 controls of European descent involved in the only published GWAS of RCC. We identified two common variants in linkage disequilibrium, rs718314 and rs1049380 (r(2) = 0.64, D? = 0.84), in the inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate receptor, type 2 (ITPR2) gene on 12p11.23 as novel susceptibility loci for RCC (P = 8.89 × 10(-10) and P = 6.07 × 10(-9), respectively, in meta-analysis) with an allelic odds ratio of 1.19 [95% confidence interval (CI): 1.13-1.26] for rs718314 and 1.18 (95% CI: 1.12-1.25) for rs1049380. It has been recently identified that rs718314 in ITPR2 is associated with waist-hip ratio (WHR) phenotype. To our knowledge, this is the first genetic locus associated with both cancer risk and WHR.
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