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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
ERK signaling regulates opposing roles of JUN family transcription factors at ETS/AP-1 sites and in cell migration.
Mol. Cell. Biol.
PUBLISHED: 10-22-2014
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JUN transcription factors bind DNA as part of the AP-1 complex, regulate many cellular processes, and play a key role in oncogenesis. The three JUN proteins (c-JUN, JUNB, and JUND) can have both redundant and unique functions depending on the biological phenotype and cell type assayed. Mechanisms that allow this dynamic switching between overlapping and distinct functions are unclear. Here we demonstrate that JUND has a role in prostate cell migration that is the opposite of c-JUN and JUNB. RNA sequencing reveals that opposing regulation by c-JUN and JUND defines a subset of AP-1 target genes with cell migration roles. Cis-regulatory elements for only this subset of targets were enriched for ETS factor binding, indicating a specificity mechanism. Interestingly, the function of c-JUN and JUND in prostate cell migration switched when comparing cells with an inactive versus active RAS/ERK signaling pathway. We show this switch is due to phosphorylation and activation of JUND by ERK. Thus, the ETS/AP-1 sequence defines a unique gene expression program regulated by the relative level of JUN proteins and RAS/ERK signaling. This work provides a rationale for how transcription factors can have distinct roles depending on the signaling status and the biological function in question.
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ETS1 is a genome-wide effector of RAS/ERK signaling in epithelial cells.
Nucleic Acids Res.
PUBLISHED: 10-07-2014
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The RAS/ERK pathway is commonly activated in carcinomas and promotes oncogenesis by altering transcriptional programs. However, the array of cis-regulatory elements and trans-acting factors that mediate these transcriptional changes is still unclear. Our genome-wide analysis determined that a sequence consisting of neighboring ETS and AP-1 transcription factor binding sites is enriched near cell migration genes activated by RAS/ERK signaling in epithelial cells. In vivo screening of candidate ETS proteins revealed that ETS1 is specifically required for migration of RAS/ERK activated cells. Furthermore, both migration and transcriptional activation through ETS/AP-1 required ERK phosphorylation of ETS1. Genome-wide mapping of multiple ETS proteins demonstrated that ETS1 binds specifically to enhancer ETS/AP-1 sequences. ETS1 occupancy, and its role in cell migration, was conserved in epithelial cells derived from multiple tissues, consistent with a chromatin organization common to epithelial cell lines. Genome-wide expression analysis showed that ETS1 was required for activation of RAS-regulated cell migration genes, but also identified a surprising role for ETS1 in the repression of genes such as DUSP4, DUSP6 and SPRY4 that provide negative feedback to the RAS/ERK pathway. Consistently, ETS1 was required for robust RAS/ERK pathway activation. Therefore, ETS1 has dual roles in mediating epithelial-specific RAS/ERK transcriptional functions.
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Prostate cancer ETS rearrangements switch a cell migration gene expression program from RAS/ERK to PI3K/AKT regulation.
Mol. Cancer
PUBLISHED: 03-13-2014
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The RAS/ERK and PI3K/AKT pathways induce oncogenic gene expression programs and are commonly activated together in cancer cells. Often, RAS/ERK signaling is activated by mutation of the RAS or RAF oncogenes, and PI3K/AKT is activated by loss of the tumor suppressor PTEN. In prostate cancer, PTEN deletions are common, but, unlike other carcinomas, RAS and RAF mutations are rare. We have previously shown that over-expression of "oncogenic" ETS transcription factors, which occurs in about one-half of prostate tumors due to chromosome rearrangement, can bypass the need for RAS/ERK signaling in the activation of a cell migration gene expression program. In this study we test the role of RAS/ERK and PI3K/AKT signaling in the function of oncogenic ETS proteins.
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Oncogenic ETS proteins mimic activated RAS/MAPK signaling in prostate cells.
Genes Dev.
PUBLISHED: 10-21-2011
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The aberrant expression of an oncogenic ETS transcription factor is implicated in the progression of the majority of prostate cancers, 40% of melanomas, and most cases of gastrointestinal stromal tumor and Ewings sarcoma. Chromosomal rearrangements in prostate cancer result in overexpression of any one of four ETS transcription factors. How these four oncogenic ETS genes differ from the numerous other ETS genes expressed in normal prostate and contribute to tumor progression is not understood. We report that these oncogenic ETS proteins, but not other ETS factors, enhance prostate cell migration. Genome-wide binding analysis matched this specific biological function to occupancy of a unique set of genomic sites highlighted by the presence of ETS- and AP-1-binding sequences. ETS/AP-1-binding sequences are prototypical RAS-responsive elements, but oncogenic ETS proteins activated a RAS/MAPK transcriptional program in the absence of MAPK activation. Thus, overexpression of oncogenic ETS proteins can replace RAS/MAPK pathway activation in prostate cells. The genomic description of this ETS/AP-1-regulated, RAS-responsive, gene expression program provides a resource for understanding the role of these ETS factors in both an oncogenic setting and the developmental processes where these genes normally function.
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Genomic and biochemical insights into the specificity of ETS transcription factors.
Annu. Rev. Biochem.
PUBLISHED: 05-10-2011
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ETS proteins are a group of evolutionarily related, DNA-binding transcriptional factors. These proteins direct gene expression in diverse normal and disease states by binding to specific promoters and enhancers and facilitating assembly of other components of the transcriptional machinery. The highly conserved DNA-binding ETS domain defines the family and is responsible for specific recognition of a common sequence motif, 5-GGA(A/T)-3. Attaining specificity for biological regulation in such a family is thus a conundrum. We present the current knowledge of routes to functional diversity and DNA binding specificity, including divergent properties of the conserved ETS and PNT domains, the involvement of flanking structured and unstructured regions appended to these dynamic domains, posttranslational modifications, and protein partnerships with other DNA-binding proteins and coregulators. The review emphasizes recent advances from biochemical and biophysical approaches, as well as insights from genomic studies that detect ETS-factor occupancy in living cells.
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The ETS gene ETV4 is required for anchorage-independent growth and a cell proliferation gene expression program in PC3 prostate cells.
Genes Cancer
PUBLISHED: 03-05-2011
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Chromosomal abnormalities that give rise to elevated expression levels of the ETS genes ETV1, ETV4, ETV5, or ERG are prevalent in prostate cancer, but the function of these transcription factors in carcinogenesis is not clear. Previous work in cell lines implicates ERG, ETV1, and ETV5 as regulators of invasive growth but not transformation. Here we show that the PC3 prostate cancer cell line provides a model system to study the over-expression of ETV4. Migration assays, anchorage independent growth assays, and microarray analysis indicate that high ETV4 expression contributes to both transformation and cellular motility in PC3 cells. ETV4 directly bound the 5 and 3 MYC enhancers and modulated expression of both MYC and other cell proliferation genes, demonstrating a potential role in cell growth control. Despite this novel role for ETV4 in anchorage independent growth, ETV4 over-expression in normal prostate-derived RWPE-1 cells showed effects similar to ETV1 over-expression - increased cellular motility, and an up-regulation of genes encoding extracellular proteins as well as ones important for development, inflammation, and wound healing. Because ETV1 and ETV4 have similar roles when introduced to the same cellular background, we suggest that the requirement of high ETV4 expression for maintenance of the anchorage-independent growth in PC3 cells is due to a specific characteristic of this cell line rather than a function of ETV4 that is distinct from the other oncogenic ETS genes. Thus, the function of ETS genes in prostate cancer may differ based on other genetic alterations in a tumor.
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Human RNA polymerase III transcriptomes and relationships to Pol II promoter chromatin and enhancer-binding factors.
Nat. Struct. Mol. Biol.
PUBLISHED: 03-10-2010
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RNA polymerase (Pol) III transcribes many noncoding RNAs (for example, transfer RNAs) important for translational capacity and other functions. We localized Pol III, alternative TFIIIB complexes (BRF1 or BRF2) and TFIIIC in HeLa cells to determine the Pol III transcriptome, define gene classes and reveal TFIIIC-only sites. Pol III localization in other transformed and primary cell lines reveals previously uncharacterized and cell type-specific Pol III loci as well as one microRNA. Notably, only a fraction of the in silico-predicted Pol III loci are occupied. Many occupied Pol III genes reside within an annotated Pol II promoter. Outside of Pol II promoters, occupied Pol III genes overlap with enhancer-like chromatin and enhancer-binding proteins such as ETS1 and STAT1. Moreover, Pol III occupancy scales with the levels of nearby Pol II, active chromatin and CpG content. These results suggest that active chromatin gates Pol III accessibility to the genome.
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The GNUMAP algorithm: unbiased probabilistic mapping of oligonucleotides from next-generation sequencing.
Bioinformatics
PUBLISHED: 10-27-2009
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The advent of next-generation sequencing technologies has increased the accuracy and quantity of sequence data, opening the door to greater opportunities in genomic research.
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DNA specificity determinants associate with distinct transcription factor functions.
PLoS Genet.
PUBLISHED: 08-25-2009
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To elucidate how genomic sequences build transcriptional control networks, we need to understand the connection between DNA sequence and transcription factor binding and function. Binding predictions based solely on consensus predictions are limited, because a single factor can use degenerate sequence motifs and because related transcription factors often prefer identical sequences. The ETS family transcription factor, ETS1, exemplifies these challenges. Unexpected, redundant occupancy of ETS1 and other ETS proteins is observed at promoters of housekeeping genes in T cells due to common sequence preferences and the presence of strong consensus motifs. However, ETS1 exhibits a specific function in T cell activation; thus, unique transcriptional targets are predicted. To uncover the sequence motifs that mediate specific functions of ETS1, a genome-wide approach, chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled with high-throughput sequencing (ChIP-seq), identified both promoter and enhancer binding events in Jurkat T cells. A comparison with DNase I sensitivity both validated the dataset and also improved accuracy. Redundant occupancy of ETS1 with the ETS protein GABPA occurred primarily in promoters of housekeeping genes, whereas ETS1 specific occupancy occurred in the enhancers of T cell-specific genes. Two routes to ETS1 specificity were identified: an intrinsic preference of ETS1 for a variant of the ETS family consensus sequence and the presence of a composite sequence that can support cooperative binding with a RUNX transcription factor. Genome-wide occupancy of RUNX factors corroborated the importance of this partnership. Furthermore, genome-wide occupancy of co-activator CBP indicated tight co-localization with ETS1 at specific enhancers, but not redundant promoters. The distinct sequences associated with redundant versus specific ETS1 occupancy were predictive of promoter or enhancer location and the ontology of nearby genes. These findings demonstrate that diversity of DNA binding motifs may enable variable transcription factor function at different genomic sites.
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At the crossroads: EGFR and PTHrP signaling in cancer-mediated diseases of bone.
Odontology
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The epidermal growth factor receptor is a well-established cancer therapeutic target due to its stimulation of proliferation, motility, and resistance to apoptosis. Recently, additional roles for the receptor have been identified in growth of metastases. Similar to development, metastatic spread requires signaling interactions between epithelial-derived tumor cells and mesenchymal derivatives of the microenvironment. This necessitates reactivation of developmental signaling molecules, including the hypercalcemia factor parathyroid hormone-related protein. This review covers the variations of epidermal growth factor receptor signaling in cancers that produce bone metastases, regulation of parathyroid hormone-related protein, and evidence that the two molecules drive cancer-mediated diseases of bone.
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RAS/ERK pathway transcriptional regulation through ETS/AP-1 binding sites.
Small GTPases
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The RAS/RAF/MEK/ERK signaling pathway is activated by mutation in many cancers. Neighboring ETS and AP-1 DNA binding sequences can act as response elements for transcriptional activation by this pathway. ERK phosphorylation of an ETS transcription factor is one mechanism of activating the RAS/ERK gene expression program that can promote cancer cell phenotypes such as proliferation, invasion, and metastasis. Recent genome-wide mapping of ETS proteins over-expressed by chromosomal rearrangement in prostate cancer reveals a second mechanism for activation of this gene expression program. An oncogenic subset of ETS transcription factors can activate RAS/ERK target genes even in the absence of RAS/ERK pathway activation by binding ETS/AP-1 sequences. Thus, regulation of cancer cell invasion and metastasis via ETS/AP-1 sequence elements depends on which ETS protein is bound, and the status of the RAS/ERK pathway. This commentary will focus on what is known about the selectivity of ETS/AP-1 sequences for different ETS transcription factors and the transcriptional consequences of ETS protein selection.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

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We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

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In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.