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A Novel Missense Mutation of Wilms' Tumor 1 Causes Autosomal Dominant FSGS.
J. Am. Soc. Nephrol.
PUBLISHED: 08-21-2014
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FSGS is a clinical disorder characterized by focal scarring of the glomerular capillary tuft, podocyte injury, and nephrotic syndrome. Although idiopathic forms of FSGS predominate, recent insights into the molecular and genetic causes of FSGS have enhanced our understanding of disease pathogenesis. Here, we report a novel missense mutation of the transcriptional regulator Wilms' Tumor 1 (WT1) as the cause of nonsyndromic, autosomal dominant FSGS in two Northern European kindreds from the United States. We performed sequential genome-wide linkage analysis and whole-exome sequencing to evaluate participants from family DUK6524. Subsequently, whole-exome sequencing and direct sequencing were performed on proband DNA from family DUK6975. We identified multiple suggestive loci on chromosomes 6, 11, and 13 in family DUK6524 and identified a segregating missense mutation (R458Q) in WT1 isoform D as the cause of FSGS in this family. The identical mutation was found in family DUK6975. The R458Q mutation was not found in 1600 control chromosomes and was predicted as damaging by in silico simulation. We depleted wt1a in zebrafish embryos and observed glomerular injury and filtration defects, both of which were rescued with wild-type but not mutant human WT1D mRNA. Finally, we explored the subcellular mechanism of the mutation in vitro. WT1(R458Q) overexpression significantly downregulated nephrin and synaptopodin expression, promoted apoptosis in HEK293 cells and impaired focal contact formation in podocytes. Taken together, these data suggest that the WT1(R458Q) mutation alters the regulation of podocyte homeostasis and causes nonsyndromic FSGS.
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Phosphodiesterase 5 inhibition ameliorates angiontensin II-induced podocyte dysmotility via the protein kinase G-mediated downregulation of TRPC6 activity.
Am. J. Physiol. Renal Physiol.
PUBLISHED: 04-16-2014
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The emerging role of the transient receptor potential cation channel isotype 6 (TRPC6) as a central contributor to various pathological processes affecting podocytes has generated interest in the development of therapeutics to modulate its function. Recent insights into the regulation of TRPC6 have revealed PKG as a potent negative modulator of TRPC6 conductance and associated signaling via its phosphorylation at two highly conserved amino acid residues: Thr(69)/Thr(70) (Thr(69) in mice and Thr(70) in humans) and Ser(321)/Ser(322) (Ser(321) in mice and Ser(322) in humans). Here, we tested the role of PKG in modulating TRPC6-dependent responses in primary and conditionally immortalized mouse podocytes. TRPC6 was phosphorylated at Thr(69) in nonstimulated podocytes, but this declined upon ANG II stimulation or overexpression of constitutively active calcineurin phosphatase. ANG II induced podocyte motility in an in vitro wound assay, and this was reduced 30-60% in cells overexpressing a phosphomimetic mutant TRPC6 (TRPC6T70E/S322E) or activated PKG (P < 0.05). Pretreatment of podocytes with the PKG agonists S-nitroso-N-acetyl-dl-penicillamine (nitric oxide donor), 8-bromo-cGMP, Bay 41-2772 (soluble guanylate cyclase activator), or phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE5) inhibitor 4-{[3',4'-(methylenedioxy)benzyl]amino}[7]-6-methoxyquinazoline attenuated ANG II-induced Thr(69) dephosphorylation and also inhibited TRPC6-dependent podocyte motility by 30-60%. These data reveal that PKG activation strategies, including PDE5 inhibition, ameliorate ANG II-induced podocyte dysmotility by targeting TRPC6 in podocytes, highlighting the potential therapeutic utility of these approaches to treat hyperactive TRPC6-dependent glomerular disease.
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Mutations in the gene that encodes the F-actin binding protein anillin cause FSGS.
J. Am. Soc. Nephrol.
PUBLISHED: 03-27-2014
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FSGS is characterized by segmental scarring of the glomerulus and is a leading cause of kidney failure. Identification of genes causing FSGS has improved our understanding of disease mechanisms and points to defects in the glomerular epithelial cell, the podocyte, as a major factor in disease pathogenesis. Using a combination of genome-wide linkage studies and whole-exome sequencing in a kindred with familial FSGS, we identified a missense mutation R431C in anillin (ANLN), an F-actin binding cell cycle gene, as a cause of FSGS. We screened 250 additional families with FSGS and found another variant, G618C, that segregates with disease in a second family with FSGS. We demonstrate upregulation of anillin in podocytes in kidney biopsy specimens from individuals with FSGS and kidney samples from a murine model of HIV-1-associated nephropathy. Overexpression of R431C mutant ANLN in immortalized human podocytes results in enhanced podocyte motility. The mutant anillin displays reduced binding to the slit diaphragm-associated scaffold protein CD2AP. Knockdown of the ANLN gene in zebrafish morphants caused a loss of glomerular filtration barrier integrity, podocyte foot process effacement, and an edematous phenotype. Collectively, these findings suggest that anillin is important in maintaining the integrity of the podocyte actin cytoskeleton.
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Prevention of sudden cardiac death in hemodialysis patients.
Cardiovasc Hematol Disord Drug Targets
PUBLISHED: 03-22-2014
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One quarter of all hemodialysis patients will succumb to sudden cardiac death (SCD), a rate far exceeding that observed in the general population. A high prevalence of atherosclerotic coronary artery disease amongst patients with end-stage kidney disease (ESKD) partly explains this exaggerated risk. However, uremia and dialysis related factors are also of critical importance. Interventions aimed at preventing SCD have been inadequately studied in patients with ESKD. Data extrapolated from non-renal populations cannot necessarily be applied to hemodialysis patients, who possess relatively unique risk factors for SCD including "uremic cardiomyopathy", electrolyte shifts, fluctuations in intravascular volume and derangements of mineral and bone metabolism. Pending data derived from proposed randomized controlled clinical trials, critical appraisal of existing evidence and the selective application of guidelines developed for the general population to dialysis patients are required if therapeutic nihilism, or excessive intervention, are to be avoided. We discuss the evidence supporting a role for medical therapies, dialysis prescription refinements, revascularization procedures and electrical therapies as potential interventions to prevent SCD amongst hemodialysis patients. Based on current best available evidence, we present suggested strategies for the prevention of arrhythmia-mediated death in this highly vulnerable patient population.
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TNXB mutations can cause vesicoureteral reflux.
J. Am. Soc. Nephrol.
PUBLISHED: 04-25-2013
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Primary vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) is the most common congenital anomaly of the kidney and the urinary tract, and it is a major risk factor for pyelonephritic scarring and CKD in children. Although twin studies support the heritability of VUR, specific genetic causes remain elusive. We performed a sequential genome-wide linkage study and whole-exome sequencing in a family with hereditary VUR. We obtained a significant multipoint parametric logarithm of odds score of 3.3 on chromosome 6p, and whole-exome sequencing identified a deleterious heterozygous mutation (T3257I) in the gene encoding tenascin XB (TNXB in 6p21.3). This mutation segregated with disease in the affected family as well as with a pathogenic G1331R change in another family. Fibroblast cell lines carrying the T3257I mutation exhibited a reduction in both cell motility and phosphorylated focal adhesion kinase expression, suggesting a defect in the focal adhesions that link the cell cytoplasm to the extracellular matrix. Immunohistochemical studies revealed that the human uroepithelial lining of the ureterovesical junction expresses TNXB, suggesting that TNXB may be important for generating tensile forces that close the ureterovesical junction during voiding. Taken together, these results suggest that mutations in TNXB can cause hereditary VUR.
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C3 glomerulopathy: consensus report.
Kidney Int.
PUBLISHED: 03-20-2013
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C3 glomerulopathy is a recently introduced pathological entity whose original definition was glomerular pathology characterized by C3 accumulation with absent or scanty immunoglobulin deposition. In August 2012, an invited group of experts (comprising the authors of this document) in renal pathology, nephrology, complement biology, and complement therapeutics met to discuss C3 glomerulopathy in the first C3 Glomerulopathy Meeting. The objectives were to reach a consensus on: the definition of C3 glomerulopathy, appropriate complement investigations that should be performed in these patients, and how complement therapeutics should be explored in the condition. This meeting report represents the current consensus view of the group.
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Inverted formin 2 mutations with variable expression in patients with sporadic and hereditary focal and segmental glomerulosclerosis.
Kidney Int.
PUBLISHED: 08-24-2011
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Focal and segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) is a major cause of end-stage kidney disease. Recent advances in molecular genetics show that defects in the podocyte play a major role in its pathogenesis and mutations in inverted formin 2 (INF2) cause autosomal dominant FSGS. In order to delineate the role of INF2 mutations in familial and sporadic FSGS, we sought to identify variants in a large cohort of patients with FSGS. A secondary objective was to define an approach for genetic screening in families with autosomal dominant disease. A total of 248 individuals were identified with FSGS, of whom 31 had idiopathic disease. The remaining patients clustered into 64 families encompassing 15 from autosomal recessive and 49 from autosomal dominant kindreds. There were missense mutations in 8 of the 49 families with autosomal dominant disease. Three of the detected variants were novel and all mutations were confined to exon 4 of INF2, a regulatory region responsible for 90% of all changes reported in FSGS due to INF2 mutations. Thus, in our series, INF2 mutations were responsible for 16% of all cases of autosomal dominant FSGS, with these mutations clustered in exon 4. Hence, screening for these mutations may represent a rapid, non-invasive and cost-effective method for the diagnosis of autosomal dominant FSGS.
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Hepatorenal correction in murine glycogen storage disease type I with a double-stranded adeno-associated virus vector.
Mol. Ther.
PUBLISHED: 07-05-2011
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Glycogen storage disease type Ia (GSD-Ia) is caused by the deficiency of glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase). Long-term complications of GSD-Ia include life-threatening hypoglycemia and proteinuria progressing to renal failure. A double-stranded (ds) adeno-associated virus serotype 2 (AAV2) vector encoding human G6Pase was pseudotyped with four serotypes, AAV2, AAV7, AAV8, and AAV9, and we evaluated efficacy in 12-day-old G6pase (-/-) mice. Hypoglycemia during fasting (plasma glucose <100 mg/dl) was prevented for >6 months by the dsAAV2/7, dsAAV2/8, and dsAAV2/9 vectors. Prolonged fasting for 8 hours revealed normalization of blood glucose following dsAAV2/9 vector administration at the higher dose. The glycogen content of kidney was reduced by >65% with both the dsAAV2/7 and dsAAV2/9 vectors, and renal glycogen content was stably reduced between 7 and 12 months of age for the dsAAV2/9 vector-treated mice. Every vector-treated group had significantly reduced glycogen content in the liver, in comparison with untreated G6pase (-/-) mice. G6Pase was expressed in many renal epithelial cells of with the dsAAV2/9 vector for up to 12 months. Albuminuria and renal fibrosis were reduced by the dsAAV2/9 vector. Hepatorenal correction in G6pase (-/-) mice demonstrates the potential of AAV vectors for the correction of inherited diseases of metabolism.
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Arhgap24 inactivates Rac1 in mouse podocytes, and a mutant form is associated with familial focal segmental glomerulosclerosis.
J. Clin. Invest.
PUBLISHED: 06-10-2011
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The specialized epithelial cell of the kidney, the podocyte, has a complex actin-based cytoskeleton. Dynamic regulation of this cytoskeleton is required for efficient barrier function of the kidney. Podocytes are a useful cell type to study the control of the actin cytoskeleton in vivo, because disruption of components of the cytoskeleton results in podocyte damage, cell loss, and a prototypic injury response called focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS). Searching for actin regulatory proteins that are expressed in podocytes, we identified a RhoA-activated Rac1 GTPase-activating protein (Rac1-GAP), Arhgap24, that was upregulated in podocytes as they differentiated, both in vitro and in vivo. Increased levels of active Rac1 and Cdc42 were measured in Arhgap24 knockdown experiments, which influenced podocyte cell shape and membrane dynamics. Consistent with a role for Arhgap24 in normal podocyte functioning in vivo, sequencing of the ARHGAP24 gene in patients with FSGS identified a mutation that impaired its Rac1-GAP activity and was associated with disease in a family with FSGS. Thus, Arhgap24 contributes to the careful balancing of RhoA and Rac1 signaling in podocytes, the disruption of which may lead to kidney disease.
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TRPC6 enhances angiotensin II-induced albuminuria.
J. Am. Soc. Nephrol.
PUBLISHED: 01-21-2011
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Mutations in the canonical transient receptor potential cation channel 6 (TRPC6) are responsible for familial forms of adult onset focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS). The mechanisms by which TRPC6 mutations cause kidney disease are not well understood. We used TRPC6-deficient mice to examine the function of TRPC6 in the kidney. We found that adult TRPC6-deficient mice had BP and albumin excretion rates similar to wild-type animals. Glomerular histomorphology revealed no abnormalities on both light and electron microscopy. To determine whether the absence of TRPC6 would alter susceptibility to hypertension and renal injury, we infused mice with angiotensin II continuously for 28 days. Although both groups developed similar levels of hypertension, TRPC6-deficient mice had significantly less albuminuria, especially during the early phase of the infusion; this suggested that TRPC6 adversely influences the glomerular filter. We used whole-cell patch-clamp recording to measure cell-membrane currents in primary cultures of podocytes from both wild-type and TRPC6-deficient mice. In podocytes from wild-type mice, angiotensin II and a direct activator of TRPC6 both augmented cell-membrane currents; TRPC6 deficiency abrogated these increases in current magnitude. Our findings suggest that TRPC6 promotes albuminuria, perhaps by promoting angiotensin II-dependent increases in Ca(2+), suggesting that TRPC6 blockade may be therapeutically beneficial in proteinuric kidney disease.
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A new locus for familial FSGS on chromosome 2p.
J. Am. Soc. Nephrol.
PUBLISHED: 07-08-2010
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FSGS is a clinicopathologic entity characterized by nephrotic syndrome and progression to ESRD. Although the pathogenesis is unknown, the podocyte seems to play a central role in this disorder. Here, we present six kindreds with hereditary FSGS that did not associate with mutations in known causal genes, and we report a new locus for the disease on chromosome 2p15 in one kindred. We performed genome-wide linkage analysis and refined the linkage area with microsatellite markers and haplotype analysis to define the minimal candidate region. Genome-wide linkage analysis yielded a maximum two-point logarithm of odds (LOD) score of 3.6 for the six families on chromosome 2p. One family contributed the largest proportion of the additive score (LOD 2.02) at this locus. Multipoint parametric LOD score calculation in this family yielded a significant LOD score of 3.1 at markers D2S393 and D2S337, and fine mapping of this region with microsatellite markers defined a minimal candidate region of 0.9 Mb with observed recombinations at markers D2S2332 and RS1919481. We excluded the remaining five families from linkage to this region by haplotype analysis. These data support a new gene locus for familial FSGS on chromosome 2p15. Identification of the mutated gene at this locus may provide further insight into the disease mechanisms of FSGS.
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Pathogenesis and therapy of focal segmental glomerulosclerosis: an update.
Pediatr. Nephrol.
PUBLISHED: 06-25-2010
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Focal and segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) is an important cause of steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome in adults and children. It is responsible for 5-20% of all cases of end-stage kidney disease (ESKD) in the United States. The pathogenesis of FSGS has not been fully elucidated; however, data from molecular studies of familial cases in the last two decades suggest that FSGS is a defect of the podocyte. The therapeutic agents available for treatment of FSGS are not very effective and only a small percentage of affected individuals will achieve complete remission. Recent data from molecular biology and molecular genetics has provided insight into the mechanisms of action of old agents and also identification of other novel therapeutic targets. This review focuses on recent advances in the molecular pathogenesis of FSGS and currently available therapeutic agents as well as potential novel therapies.
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Exclusion of homozygous PLCE1 (NPHS3) mutations in 69 families with idiopathic and hereditary FSGS.
Pediatr. Nephrol.
PUBLISHED: 05-12-2009
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Focal and segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) is the most common glomerular cause of end-stage kidney disease (ESKD). Although the etiology of FSGS has not been fully elucidated, recent results from the positional cloning of genes mutated in nephrotic syndromes are now beginning to provide insight into the pathogenesis of these diseases. Mutations in PLCE1/NPHS3 have recently been reported as a cause of nephrotic syndrome characterized by diffuse mesangial sclerosis (DMS) histology. One single family with a missense mutation had late onset of the disease that was characterized by FSGS. To further define the role of PLCE1 mutations in the etiology of FSGS, we performed mutational analysis in 69 families with FSGS. A total of 69 families with 231 affected individuals were examined. The median age of disease onset was 26 years (range 1-66 years). Onset of ESKD was at a median age of 35.5 years. Seven variants leading to non-synonymous changes were found, of which only two are new variants (exon 4 c.1682 G>A R561Q, exon 31 c.6518A>G K2173R). No known disease-causing mutations were identified in the families screened. PLCE1/NPHS3 mutations are not a cause of FSGS in this cohort. The absence of mutations in PLCE1/NPHS3 in this study indicates that there are additional genetic causes of FSGS and that hereditary FSGS is a heterogeneous disease. Kindreds appropriate for genome-wide screening are currently being subjected to analysis with the aim of identifying other genetic causes of FSGS.
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A hybrid CFHR3-1 gene causes familial C3 glomerulopathy.
J. Am. Soc. Nephrol.
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Controlled activation of the complement system, a key component of innate immunity, enables destruction of pathogens with minimal damage to host tissue. Complement factor H (CFH), which inhibits complement activation, and five CFH-related proteins (CFHR1-5) compose a family of structurally related molecules. Combined deletion of CFHR3 and CFHR1 is common and confers a protective effect in IgA nephropathy. Here, we report an autosomal dominant complement-mediated GN associated with abnormal increases in copy number across the CFHR3 and CFHR1 loci. In addition to normal copies of these genes, affected individuals carry a unique hybrid CFHR3-1 gene. In addition to identifying an association between these genetic observations and complement-mediated kidney disease, these results provide insight into the protective role of the combined deletion of CFHR3 and CFHR1 in IgA nephropathy.
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JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

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In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.