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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Yolk sac mesenchymal progenitor cells from New World mice (Necromys lasiurus) with multipotent differential potential.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2014
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Fetal membranes are abundant, ethically acceptable and readily accessible sources of stem cells. In particular, the yolk sac is a source of cell lineages that do not express MHCs and are mainly free from immunological incompatibles when transferred to a recipient. Although data are available especially for hematopoietic stem cells in mice and human, whereas other cell types and species are dramatically underrepresented. Here we studied the nature and differentiation potential of yolk sac derived mesenchymal stem cells from a New World mouse, Necromys lasiurus. Explants from mid-gestation were cultured in DMEM-High glucose medium with 10% defined fetal bovine serum. The cells were characterized by standard methods including immunophenotyping by fluorescence and flow cytometry, growth and differentiation potential and tumorigenicity assays. The first adherent cells were observed after 7 days of cell culture and included small, elongated fibroblast-like cells (92.13%) and large, round epithelial-like cells with centrally located nuclei (6.5%). Only the fibroblast-like cells survived the first passages. They were positive to markers for mesenchymal stem cells (Stro-1, CD90, CD105, CD73) and pluripotency (Oct3/4, Nanog) as well as precursors of hematopoietic stem cells (CD117). In differentiation assays, they were classified as a multipotent lineage, because they differentiated into osteogenic, adipogenic, and chondrogenic lineages and, finally, they did not develop tumors. In conclusion, mesenchymal progenitor cells with multipotent differentiation potential and sufficient growth and proliferation abilities were able to be obtained from Necromys yolk sacs, therefore, we inferred that these cells may be promising for a wide range of applications in regenerative medicine.
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Development and morphology of the inverted yolk sac in the guinea pig (Cavia porcellus).
Theriogenology
PUBLISHED: 02-15-2013
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Although the guinea pig is an important animal model for human placentation, aspects of fetal nutrition are not fully understood, especially in regard to the yolk sac that is regarded to be essential for early development of the embryo. We investigated differentiation by means of histology, histochemistry, immunohistochemistry, and transmission electron microscopy. Data suggest that the guinea pigs yolk sac was not sufficiently developed to facilitate substantial fetal nutrition in early pregnancy. On Day 12, it was a flat, inverted, but avascular structure. This was followed by differentiation to form the typical, highly villous and vascularized condition of advanced gestation. Finally, the yolk sac degenerated toward term. We suggest that the guinea pig and other caviomorphs rely predominantly on hemotrophic nutrition via the placenta even in very early pregnancy. In contrast to the general pattern of mammals, histiotrophic nutrition via yolk sac routes seems to be most essential during mid-gestation.
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Ultrastructure of the bullfrog (Lithobates catesbeianus-Shaw, 1802) oviduct in different seasons.
Microsc. Res. Tech.
PUBLISHED: 01-15-2013
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The bullfrog (Lithobates catesbeianus) is an exotic animal that adapted perfectly to the climatic conditions of Brazil after introduction in the country. These climatic conditions favor the reproduction and fattening of bullfrogs. However, the development of the bullfrog is significantly reduced in colder regions because low temperatures affect the secretion of gonadotropins and change the sensitivity of the germinal epithelium to gonadotropic hormones. Thus, the temperature and photoperiod are abiotic factors that influence the life cycle of this species, especially with regard to reproduction. Samples from different regions of the oviducts (the infundibulum, magnum, and isthmus) of 9 bullfrogs were collected in the different seasons of the year. The samples were fixed and processed for analysis with scanning and transmission electron microscopy. A comparison of the morphology of the oviducts collected during different seasonal periods suggests that the frogs have greater reproductive potential in the spring due to the development of the structures related to the oviduct, presence of developed cilia, and electron-dense granules. However, seasonal changes were noted in the animal throughout the year in preparation for reproduction during the spring and summer.
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Chorioallantoic and yolk sac placentation in Thrichomys laurentinus (Echimyidae) and the evolution of hystricognath rodents.
J. Exp. Zool. B Mol. Dev. Evol.
PUBLISHED: 02-03-2011
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The evolutionary history of Hystricognathi is associated with major transformations in their placental system. Data so far indicate that key characters are independent from size dimensions in medium to very large species. To better understand the situation in smaller species, we analyzed placental development in a spiny rat, Thrichomys laurentinus. Fourteen individuals ranging from early implantation to near term were investigated by histology, immunohistochemistry, proliferation activity and electron microscopy. Placentation in Thrichomys revealed major parallels to the guinea pig and other hystricognath rodents with respect to the early and invasive implantation, the process of trophoblast invasion, the internal organization of the labyrinth and the trophospongium as well as the establishment of the complete inverted yolk sac placenta. In contrast to systematically related small-sized species, the placental regionalization in Thrichomys was characterized by a remarkable lobulated structure and associated growing processes. Reverse to former perspectives, these conditions represented ancient character states of hystricognaths. The subplacenta was temporarily supplied by both the maternal and fetal blood systems, a rare condition among hystricognaths. The extraplacental trophoblast originating from the subplacenta was partly proliferative in mid gestation. In conclusion, the presented results indicated that only minor variations occurred in small-sized hystricognath species, independent of their systematic interrelationships. Previous views were supported that placentation in hystricognaths followed an extraordinary stable pattern, although the group had distinct habitats in South America and Africa that were separated 30-40 million years ago.
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Morphological observations of ampullae of lorenzini in Squatina guggenheim and S. occulta (Chondrichthyes, Elasmobranchii, Squatinidae).
Microsc. Res. Tech.
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We have conducted a morphological study of the ampullae of Lorenzini on two shark species from Squatina Genus. In both species, S. guggenheim and S. occulta, the ampullae were observed like small pores scattered in the head region similar to other species of the Chondrichthyes Class. However, differently of the other species a greatest density of ampullae of Lorenzini was observed along of the body surface. After fixation using 10% formaldehyde, the ampullae were removed and processed for light and scanning electron microscopy. Macroscopically, the two shark species differed by the presence of dorsal spines that appeared from the head to the first dorsal fin in S. guggenheim and were absent in S. occulta. Microscopically, there were no differences between the ampullae of Lorenzini channels in these two species. The wall of the ampulla was formed by a simple squamous epithelium. Bands of connective tissue, hyaline cartilage and collagen fibers were found between the ampulla and the skeletal striated muscle layer. Nerve branches responsible for conducting signal pulses to the central nervous system were visible between the muscle and connective tissue layers. Using scanning electron microscopy and histological analysis, we found that the channels were twisted and positioned parallel to the skin. The inside of the channels contained a large amount of a gelatinous secretion composed by polysaccharides. Therefore, we conclude that the morphological combination of extended distribution of the ampullae of Lorenzini and the body shape may represent an adaptation of these species to their way of life.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.