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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
European enhanced surveillance of invasive pneumococcal disease in 2010: data from 26 European countries in the post-heptavalent conjugate vaccine era.
Vaccine
PUBLISHED: 02-18-2014
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Streptococcus pneumoniae is a leading cause of severe infectious diseases worldwide. This paper presents the results from the first European invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) enhanced surveillance where additional and valuable data were reported and analysed. Following its authorisation in Europe in 2001 for use in children aged between two months and five years, the heptavalent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) was progressively introduced in the European Union (EU)/European Economic Area (EEA) countries, albeit with different schemes and policies. In mid-2010 European countries started to switch to a higher valency vaccine (PCV10/PCV13), still without a significant impact by the time of this surveillance. Therefore, this surveillance provides an overview of baseline data from the transition period between the introduction of PCV7 and the implementation of PCV10/PCV13. In 2010, 26 EU/EEA countries reported 21 565 cases of IPD to The European Surveillance System (TESSy) applying the EU 2008 case definition. Serotype was determined in 9946/21565 (46.1%) cases. The most common serotypes were 19A, 1, 7F, 3, 14, 22F, 8, 4, 12F and 19F, accounting for 5949/9946 (59.8%) of the serotyped isolates. Data on antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST) in the form of minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) were submitted for penicillin 5384/21565 (25.0%), erythromycin 4031/21565 (18.7%) and cefotaxime 5252/21565 (24.4%). Non-susceptibility to erythromycin was highest at 17.6% followed by penicillin at 8.9%. PCV7 serotype coverage among children <5 years in Europe, was 19.2%; for the same age group, the serotype coverage for PCV10 and PCV13 were 46.1% and 73.1%, respectively. In the era of pneumococcal conjugate vaccines, the monitoring of changing trends in antimicrobial resistance and serotype distribution are essential in assessing the impact of vaccines and antibiotic use control programmes across European countries.
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The issue of mandatory vaccination for healthcare workers in Europe.
Expert Rev Vaccines
PUBLISHED: 12-18-2013
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Mandatory policies have occasionally been implemented, targeting optimal vaccination uptake among healthcare workers (HCWs). Herein, we analyze the existing recommendations in European countries and discuss the feasibility of implementing mandatory vaccination for HCWs. As reflected by a survey among vaccine experts from 29 European countries, guidelines on HCW vaccination were issued in all countries, though with substantial differences in targeted diseases, HCW groups and type of recommendation. Mandatory policies were only exceptionally implemented. Results from a second survey suggested that such policies would not become easily adopted, and recommendations might work better if focusing on specific HCW groups and appropriate diseases such as hepatitis B, influenza and measles. In conclusion, guidelines for HCW vaccination, but not mandatory policies, are widely adopted in Europe. Recommendations targeting specific HCW groups and diseases might be better accepted and facilitate higher vaccine uptake than policies vaguely targeting all HCW groups.
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Assessing vaccination coverage in the European Union: is it still a challenge?
Expert Rev Vaccines
PUBLISHED: 08-23-2011
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Assessing vaccination coverage is of paramount importance for improving quality and effectiveness of vaccination programs. In this article, some of the different systems that are used for assessing vaccination coverage within and outside the EU are reviewed in order to explore the need for improving vaccination coverage data quality. All countries in the EU have implemented vaccination programs for children, which include vaccinations to protect against between nine and 14 infectious diseases. Collecting and assessing vaccination coverage regularly is part of such programs, but the methods used vary widely. Some quality issues are evident when data reported through administrative methods are compared with seroprevalence studies or other surveys. More thorough assessment of vaccination coverage and more effective information sharing are needed in the EU. A homogeneous system for assessing vaccination coverage would facilitate comparability across countries and might increase the level of the quality of both the national and local systems. Cooperative and coordinated responses to vaccine-preventable disease threats might be improved by better information sharing.
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Eurogin 2010 roadmap on cervical cancer prevention.
Int. J. Cancer
PUBLISHED: 03-25-2011
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The EUROGIN 2010 roadmap represents a continuing effort to provide and interpret updated information on cervical cancer screening and vaccination against the cause of the disease, high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV). Contrary to the two previous reports in 2008 and 2009, the present roadmap gives equal room to HPV-based screening and HPV vaccination, as a result of the recent strengthening of the evidence on the efficacy and feasibility of both approaches. The superiority of HPV testing in primary screening compared to cytology (in more developed countries) and to cytology or visual inspection methods (in less developed countries) has been demonstrated in several randomised trials. High vaccine efficacy has been confirmed up to 7 years after vaccination; school-based programmes in some countries have been able to reach over 70% coverage among adolescent girls. Demonstration projects have indicated that the delivery of HPV vaccines in less developed countries is feasible and favourably received by populations where cervical cancer is very common. HPV-based screening can diminish cervical cancer incidence more quickly than HPV vaccination, but vaccination can eventually facilitate screening efforts, especially if new vaccines against a greater number of HPV types are introduced. The availability of two highly complementary prevention tools such as HPV testing and HPV vaccination makes it possible to conceive integrated strategies for the elimination of cervical cancer that have no precedent in the cancer field. HPV tests and HPV vaccines remain, however, too expensive, and large-scale financing of screening and vaccination in less developed countries is sorely lacking.
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Reliable surveillance of tick-borne encephalitis in European countries is necessary to improve the quality of vaccine recommendations.
Vaccine
PUBLISHED: 05-26-2010
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In July-November 2009, 26 European Union (EU) Member States (MSs), Norway and Iceland, participated in a survey seeking information on national tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) vaccination recommendations. Information on TBE surveillance, methods used to ascertain endemic areas, vaccination recommendations, vaccine coverage and methods of monitoring of vaccine coverage were obtained. Sixteen countries (57%) reported presence of TBE endemic areas on their territory. Vaccination against TBE was recommended for the general population in 8 (28%) countries, for occupational risk groups - in 13 (46%) countries, and for tourists going abroad - in 22 (78%) countries. Although vaccination recommendations for country residents, and for tourists always referred to endemic areas, there was no uniform, standardized method used to define endemic areas. For this reason, clear recommendations for tourists need to be developed, and standardized surveillance directed to efficient assessment of TBE risk need to be implemented in European countries.
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Monitoring and assessing vaccine safety: a European perspective.
Expert Rev Vaccines
PUBLISHED: 04-08-2010
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The success of vaccination programs is an uncontroversial reality--in Europe as well as worldwide. On the other hand, the perceived risk of adverse events in the general public is the most important threat for implementing successful vaccination programs in Europe. For this reason, monitoring and assessing vaccine safety is a priority for public health. Vaccine safety is assessed both before and after vaccine authorization. In postmarketing settings, different activities related to vaccine safety usually involve several different stakeholders. In 2005, a new EU agency, the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control, was established with the aim to strengthen Europes defences against infectious diseases. Implementing stable links between different stakeholders and defining clear roles in the EU is paramount in order to provide optimal and transparent information on adverse reactions following immunization, with the final goal of increasing compliance to safe and effective vaccination programs.
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Monitoring the rate of hospitalization before rotavirus immunization in Italy utilizing ICD9-CM regional databases.
Hum Vaccin
PUBLISHED: 03-10-2009
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Recently, two Rotavirus (RV) vaccines were licensed in Italy, rendering RV illness a vaccine preventable disease. To assess the RV hospitalization rate in Italy, a study focused on the Regional hospital discharge forms (HDD) databases was carried out.
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The importance of influenza prevention for public health.
Hum Vaccin Immunother
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Annual epidemics of seasonal (inter-pandemic) influenza represent a significant burden on society in terms of morbidity, mortality, hospitalizations and lost working time. The impact of influenza depends on a mix of direct and indirect effects and is not easy to assess. Nevertheless there is a consensus in considering influenza prevention and mitigation high priorities for public health. We review the available evidence to assess the impact of influenza prevention focusing especially on vaccines and immunization strategies.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.