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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Effects of high-amount-high-intensity exercise on in vivo platelet activation: Modulation by lipid peroxidation and AGE/RAGE axis.
Thromb. Haemost.
PUBLISHED: 04-11-2013
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Physical activity is associated with cardiovascular risk reduction, but the effects of exercise on platelet activation remain controversial. We investigated the effects of regular high-amount, high intensity aerobic exercise on in vivo thromboxane (TX)-dependent platelet activation and plasma levels of platelet-derived proteins, CD40L and P-selectin, and whether platelet variables changes may be related to changes in high-density lipoprotein (HDL) and in the extent of oxidative stress and oxidative stress-related inflammation, as reflected by urinary isoprostane excretion and endogenous soluble receptor for advanced glycation end-products (esRAGE), respectively. Urinary excretion of 11-dehydro-TXB2 and 8-iso-prostaglandin (PG)F2? and plasma levels of P-selectin, CD40L and esRAGE were measured before and after a eight-week standardised aerobic high-amount-high-intensity training program in 22 sedentary subjects with low-to-intermediate risk. Exercise training had a clear beneficial effect on HDL cholesterol (+10%, p=0.027) and triglyceride (-27%, p=0.008) concentration. In addition, a significant (p<0.0001) decrease in urinary 11-dehydro-TXB2 (26%), 8-iso-PGF2? (21%), plasma P-selectin (27%), CD40L (35%) and a 61% increase in esRAGE were observed. Multiple regression analysis revealed that urinary 8-iso-PGF2? [beta=0.33, SEM=0.116, p=0.027] and esRAGE (beta=-0.30, SEM=31.3, p=0.046) were the only significant predictors of urinary 11-dehydro-TXB2 excretion rate over the training period. In conclusion, regular high-amount-high-intensity exercise training has broad beneficial effects on platelet activation markers, paralleled and possibly associated with changes in the lipoprotein profile and in markers of lipid peroxidation and AGE/RAGE axis. Our findings may help explaining why a similar amount of exercise exerts significant benefits in preventing cardiovascular events.
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Shared action spaces: a basis function framework for social re-calibration of sensorimotor representations supporting joint action.
Front Hum Neurosci
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2013
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The article explores the possibilities of formalizing and explaining the mechanisms that support spatial and social perspective alignment sustained over the duration of a social interaction. The basic proposed principle is that in social contexts the mechanisms for sensorimotor transformations and multisensory integration (learn to) incorporate information relative to the other actor(s), similar to the "re-calibration" of visual receptive fields in response to repeated tool use. This process aligns or merges the co-actors spatial representations and creates a "Shared Action Space" (SAS) supporting key computations of social interactions and joint actions; for example, the remapping between the coordinate systems and frames of reference of the co-actors, including perspective taking, the sensorimotor transformations required for lifting jointly an object, and the predictions of the sensory effects of such joint action. The social re-calibration is proposed to be based on common basis function maps (BFMs) and could constitute an optimal solution to sensorimotor transformation and multisensory integration in joint action or more in general social interaction contexts. However, certain situations such as discrepant postural and viewpoint alignment and associated differences in perspectives between the co-actors could constrain the process quite differently. We discuss how alignment is achieved in the first place, and how it is maintained over time, providing a taxonomy of various forms and mechanisms of space alignment and overlap based, for instance, on automaticity vs. control of the transformations between the two agents. Finally, we discuss the link between low-level mechanisms for the sharing of space and high-level mechanisms for the sharing of cognitive representations.
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A study of postural changes after breast augmentation.
Aesthetic Plast Surg
PUBLISHED: 08-18-2011
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A number of factors, including body mass and ones mood, may influence posture. Breast augmentation results not only in a significant improvement in body image-related feelings and self-esteem but also in a sudden change in body mass. The aim of this study was to assess postural changes following breast augmentation by studying body position, orientation through space, and center of pressure.
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Acute and cumulative effects of focused high-frequency vibrations on the endocrine system and muscle strength.
Eur. J. Appl. Physiol.
PUBLISHED: 09-24-2010
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The purpose of this study was to evaluate the acute and long-term effects of local high-intensity vibration (HLV, f = 300 Hz) on muscle performance and blood hormone concentrations in healthy young men. Totally 18 subjects (cV group) were studied in two sessions, either without (control) or with HLV treatment. The protocol was the same on both control and test days, except that, in the second session, subjects underwent HLV treatment. Counter-movement jumping (CMJ), maximal isometric voluntary contraction (MVC) test, and hormonal levels were measured before the procedure, immediately thereafter, and 1 h later. To assess the long-term effects of HLV, the cV group was subjected to HLV on the leg muscles for 4 weeks, and a second group (cR group, n = 18) embarked upon a resistance training program. All subjects underwent an MVC test and an isokinetic (100 deg/s) test before training, 4 weeks after training, and 2 months after the end of training. The HLV protocol significantly increased the serum level of growth hormone (GH, P < 0.05) and creatine phosphokinase (CPK, P < 0.05), and decreased the level of cortisol (P < 0.05). None of GH, CPK or testosterone levels were altered in controls. There was a significant improvement in MVC (P < 0.05). After 4 weeks, both the cV and cR groups demonstrated significant improvement in MVC and isokinetic tests (P < 0.05). This increase persisted for at least 2 months. Our results indicate that HLV influences the levels of particular hormones and improves neuromuscular performance. Our results indicate that HLV has a long-term beneficial effect comparable to that of resistance training.
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Effects of local vibrations on skeletal muscle trophism in elderly people: mechanical, cellular, and molecular events.
Int. J. Mol. Med.
PUBLISHED: 09-03-2009
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Several studies have examined the effects of vibrations on muscle mass and performance in young healthy people. We studied the effects of vibrations on muscles of elderly male and female volunteers (65-85 years of age) diagnosed with sarcopenia. We applied mechanical vibrations locally (local vibrational training) to the thigh muscles at 300 Hz for a period of 12 weeks, starting with a session of 15 min stimulation once a week and increasing to three sessions of 15 min per week. Treated muscles displayed enhanced maximal isometric strength and increased content of fast MyHC-2X myosin. Single muscle fiber analysis did not show any change in cross-sectional area or in specific tension. Analysis of transcriptional profiles by microarray revealed changes in gene expression after 12 weeks of local vibrational training. In particular, pathways related with energy metabolism, sarcomeric protein balance and oxidative stress response were affected. We conclude that vibration treatment is effective in counteracting the loss of muscular strength associated with sarcopenia and the mode of action of vibration is based on cellular and molecular changes which do not include increase in fiber or muscle size.
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A study of postural changes after breast reduction.
Aesthetic Plast Surg
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Numerous factors such as the equilibrium of body masses and psychological status influence human posture. Breast reduction, on the one hand, produces a sudden change in this equilibrium, and on the other hand, it can modify the psychological status, significantly improving body image and self-esteem. This study aimed to assess postural changes after breast reduction by studying the position and orientation in space of the body and center of pressure.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.