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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Haemoproteus syrnii in Strix aluco from France: morphology, stages of sporogony in a hippoboscid fly, molecular characterization and discussion on the identification of Haemoproteus species.
Parasite
PUBLISHED: 09-13-2013
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In France, Haemoproteus syrnii is frequently found in the Tawny Owl, Strix aluco. Additional and complementary features of this species, and in particular the characteristics of volutin, are presented. The authors consider the volutin granules as constant in a given species, and discuss their taxonomic value. These cytoplasmic inclusions appear early during the first stages of development of the gametocytes as an initial granule which multiplies as the parasite develops. They were reported in some species of Haemoproteus but are seldom considered as a specific character and described with precision. Sporogony from ookinete to apparently mature sporozoites appears to take place in a pupiparous hippoboscid (Ornithomyia sp.). One specimen was crushed between two slides and stained with Giemsa. Gametocytes of H. syrnii, many ookinetes, an immature oocyst and mature sporozoites were observed spread all over the smear. This would allow classifying this species in the Haemoproteus subgenus. We provide associated molecular data derived from the cyt b and cox 1 gene from this parasite. We discuss the problems of multiple infections and the difficulties in identifying Haemoproteus species and in deriving conclusions from sequences deposited in databases.
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Mechanics of the Toxoplasma gondii oocyst wall.
Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A.
PUBLISHED: 06-24-2013
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The ability of microorganisms to survive under extreme conditions is closely related to the physicochemical properties of their wall. In the ubiquitous protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii, the oocyst stage possesses a bilayered wall that protects the dormant but potentially infective parasites from harsh environmental conditions until their ingestion by the host. None of the common disinfectants are effective in killing the parasite because the oocyst wall acts as a primary barrier to physical and chemical attacks. Here, we address the structure and chemistry of the wall of the T. gondii oocyst by combining wall surface treatments, fluorescence imaging, EM, and measurements of its mechanical characteristics by using atomic force microscopy. Elasticity and indentation measurements indicated that the oocyst wall resembles common plastic materials, based on the Young moduli, E, evaluated by atomic force microscopy. Our study demonstrates that the inner layer is as robust as the bilayered wall itself. Besides wall mechanics, our results suggest important differences regarding the nonspecific adhesive properties of each layer. All together, these findings suggest a key biological role for the oocyst wall mechanics in maintaining the integrity of the T. gondii oocysts in the environment or after exposure to disinfectants, and therefore their potential infectivity to humans and animals.
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Interaction forces drive the environmental transmission of pathogenic protozoa.
Appl. Environ. Microbiol.
PUBLISHED: 12-09-2011
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The protozoan parasites Giardia duodenalis, Cryptosporidium spp., and Toxoplasma gondii are pathogens that are resistant to a number of environmental factors and pose significant risks to public health worldwide. Their environmental transmission is closely governed by the physicochemical properties of their cysts (Giardia) and oocysts (Cryptosporidium and Toxoplasma), allowing their transport, retention, and survival for months in water, soil, vegetables, and mollusks, which are the main reservoirs for human infection. Importantly, the cyst/oocyst wall plays a key role in that regard by exhibiting a complex polymeric coverage that determines the charge and hydrophobic characteristics of parasites surfaces. Interaction forces between parasites and other environmental particles may be, in a first approximation, evaluated following the Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory of colloidal stability. However, due to the molecular topography and nano- to microstructure of the cyst/oocyst surface, non-DVLO hydrophobic forces together with additional steric attractive and/or repulsive forces may play a pivotal role in controlling the parasite behavior when the organism is subjected to various external conditions. Here, we review several parameters that enhance or hinder the adhesion of parasites to other particles and surfaces and address the role of fast-emerging techniques for mapping the cyst/oocyst surface, e.g., by measuring its topology and the generated interaction forces at the nano- to microscale. We discuss why characterizing these interactions could be a crucial step for managing the environmental matrices at risk of microbial pollution.
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Microtubule-induced nuclear envelope fluctuations control chromatin dynamics in Drosophila embryos.
Development
PUBLISHED: 07-13-2011
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Nuclear shape is different in stem cells and differentiated cells and reflects important changes in the mechanics of the nuclear envelope (NE). The current framework emphasizes the key role of the nuclear lamina in nuclear mechanics and its alterations in disease. Whether active stress controls nuclear deformations and how this stress interplays with properties of the NE to control NE dynamics is unclear. We address this in the early Drosophila embryo, in which profound changes in NE shape parallel the transcriptional activation of the zygotic genome. We show that microtubule (MT) polymerization events produce the elementary forces necessary for NE dynamics. Moreover, large-scale NE deformations associated with groove formation require concentration of MT polymerization in bundles organized by Dynein. However, MT bundles cannot produce grooves when the farnesylated inner nuclear membrane protein Kugelkern (Kuk) is absent. Although it increases stiffness of the NE, Kuk also stabilizes NE deformations emerging from the collective effect of MT polymerization forces concentrated in bundles. Finally, we report that MT-induced NE deformations control the dynamics of chromatin and its organization at steady state. Thus, the NE is a dynamic organelle, fluctuations of which increase chromatin dynamics. We propose that such mechanical regulation of chromatin dynamics by MTs might be important for gene regulation.
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Force measurements of TCR/pMHC recognition at T cell surface.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 06-25-2011
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The rupture forces and adhesion frequencies of single recognition complexes between an affinity selected peptide/MHC complex and a TCR at a murine hybridoma surface were measured using Atomic Force Microscopy. When the CD8 coreceptor is absent, the adhesion frequency depends on the nature of the peptide but the rupture force does not. When CD8 is present, no effect of the nature of the peptide is observed. CD8 is proposed to act as a time and distance lock, enabling the shorter TCR molecule to bridge the pMHC and have time to finely read the peptide. Ultimately, such experiments could help the dissection of the sequential steps by which the TCR reads the peptide/MHC complex in order to control T cell activation.
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Nongenomic effects of cisplatin: acute inhibition of mechanosensitive transporters and channels without actin remodeling.
Cancer Res.
PUBLISHED: 09-14-2010
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Cisplatin is an antineoplastic drug, mostly documented to cause cell death through the formation of DNA adducts. In patients, it exhibits a range of short-term side effects that are unlikely to be related to its genomic action. As cisplatin has been shown to modify membrane properties in different cell systems, we investigated its effects on mechanosensitive ion transporters and channels. We show here that cisplatin is a noncompetitive inhibitor of the mechanosensitive Na(+)/H(+) exchanger NHE-1, with a half-inhibition concentration of 30 ?g/mL associated with a decrease in V(max) and Hill coefficient. We also showed that it blocks the Cl(-) and K(+) mechanosensitive channels VSORC and TREK-1 at similar concentrations. In contrast, the nonmechanosensitive Cl(-) and K(+) channels CFTR and TASK-1 and the Na(+)-coupled glucose transport, which share functional features with VSORC, TREK-1, and NHE-1, respectively, were insensitive to cisplatin. We next investigated whether cisplatin action was due to a direct effect on membrane or to cortical actin remodeling that would affect mechanosensors. Using scanning electron microscopy, in vivo actin labeling, and atomic force microscopy, we did not observe any modification of the Youngs modulus and actin cytoskeleton for up to 60 and 120 ?g/mL cisplatin, whereas these concentrations modified membrane morphology. Our results reveal a novel mechanism for cisplatin, which affects mechanosensitive channels and transporters involved in cell fate programs and/or expressed in mechanosensitive organs in which cisplatin elicits strong secondary effects, such as the inner ear or the peripheral nervous system. These results might constitute a common denominator to previously unrelated effects of this drug.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.