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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Hemin inhibits the large conductance potassium channel in brain mitochondria: a putative novel mechanism of neurodegeneration.
Exp. Neurol.
PUBLISHED: 04-14-2014
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Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is a pathological condition that accompanies certain neurological diseases like hemorrhagic stroke or brain trauma. Its effects are severely destructive to the brain and can be fatal. There is an entire spectrum of harmful factors which are associated with the pathogenesis of ICH. One of them is a massive release of hemin from the decomposed erythrocytes. It has been previously shown, that hemin can inhibit the large-conductance Ca(2+)-regulated potassium channel in the plasma membrane. However, it remained unclear whether this phenomenon applies also to the mitochondrial large-conductance Ca(2+)-regulated potassium channel. The aim of the present study was to determine the impact of hemin on the activity of the large conductance Ca(2+)-regulated potassium channel in the brain mitochondria (mitoBKCa). In order to do so, we have used a patch-clamp technique and shown that hemin inhibits mitoBKCa in human astrocytoma U-87 MG cell line mitochondria. Since opening of the mitochondrial potassium channels is known to be cytoprotective, we have elucidated whether hemin can attenuate some of the beneficiary effects of potassium channel opening. We have studied the effect of hemin on reactive oxygen species synthesis, and mild mitochondrial uncoupling in isolated rat brain mitochondria. Taken together, our data show that hemin inhibits mitoBKCa and partially abolishes some of the cytoprotective properties of potassium channel opening. Considering the role of the mitoBKCa in cytoprotection, it can be presumed that its inhibition by hemin may be a novel mechanism contributing to the severity of the ICH symptoms. However, the validity of the presented results shall be further verified in an experimental model of ICH.
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Modulation of the mitochondrial large-conductance calcium-regulated potassium channel by polyunsaturated fatty acids.
Biochim. Biophys. Acta
PUBLISHED: 01-03-2014
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Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) and their metabolites can modulate several biochemical processes in the cell and thus prevent various diseases. PUFAs have a number of cellular targets, including membrane proteins. They can interact with plasma membrane and intracellular potassium channels. The goal of this work was to verify the interaction between PUFAs and the most common and intensively studied mitochondrial large conductance Ca(2+)-regulated potassium channel (mitoBKCa). For this purpose human astrocytoma U87 MG cell lines were investigated using a patch-clamp technique. We analyzed the effects of arachidonic acid (AA); eicosatetraynoic acid (ETYA), which is a non-metabolizable analog of AA; docosahexaenoic acid (DHA); and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA). The open probability (Po) of the channel did not change significantly after application of 10?M ETYA. Po increased, however, after adding 10?M AA. The application of 30?M DHA or 10?M EPA also increased the Po of the channel. Additionally, the number of open channels in the patch increased in the presence of 30?M EPA. Collectively, our results indicate that PUFAs regulate the BKCa channel from the inner mitochondrial membrane.
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Potassium Channel in the Mitochondria of Human Keratinocytes.
J. Invest. Dermatol.
PUBLISHED: 08-21-2013
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The activation of mitochondrial potassium channels induces cytoprotection in various cell types. Hence, the identification of ion channels present in the inner mitochondrial membrane of keratinocytes is important in distinguishing possible protective mechanisms in these cells. In this paper, inner membrane mitochondrial ion channels of the human keratinocyte HaCaT cell line were investigated using a patch-clamp technique. We observed potassium-selective channel activity with a conductance of 83?pS at positive voltages. The I-V curve indicates that the observed channel has rectifying properties. Moreover, the channel activity was inhibited by acidic pH and 1?mM lidocaine. Using reverse transcriptase-PCR, we found an mRNA transcript for the TASK-3 (tandem pore domain acid-sensitive K channels) channel. We observed co-localization of the TASK-3 protein and a mitochondrial marker in the mitochondria of HaCaT cells. Additionally, we showed that TASK-3 knockdown HaCaT cells markedly decreased viability after UVB radiation exposure compared with control cells. In summary, the single-channel activity and properties of a mitochondrial potassium channel in a keratinocyte HaCaT cell line have been described.Journal of Investigative Dermatology advance online publication, 7 November 2013; doi:10.1038/jid.2013.422.
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Large-conductance Ca²?-activated potassium channel in mitochondria of endothelial EA.hy926 cells.
Am. J. Physiol. Heart Circ. Physiol.
PUBLISHED: 03-29-2013
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In the present study, we describe the existence of a large-conductance Ca²?-activated potassium (BKCa) channel in the mitochondria of the human endothelial cell line EA.hy926. A single-channel current was recorded from endothelial mitoplasts (i.e., inner mitochondrial membrane) using the patch-clamp technique in the mitoplast-attached mode. A potassium-selective current was recorded with a mean conductance equal to 270 ± 10 pS in a symmetrical 150/150 mM KCl isotonic solution. The channel activity, which was determined as the open probability, increased with the addition of calcium ions and the potassium channel opener NS1619. Conversely, the activity of the channel was irreversibly blocked by paxilline and iberiotoxin, BKCa channel inhibitors. The open-state probability was found to be voltage dependent. The substances known to modulate BKCa channel activity influenced the bioenergetics of mitochondria isolated from human endothelial EA.hy926 cells. In isolated mitochondria, 100 ?M Ca²?, 10 ?M NS1619, and 0.5 ?M NS11021 depolarized the mitochondrial membrane potential and stimulated nonphosphorylating respiration. These effects were blocked by iberiotoxin and paxilline in a potassium-dependent manner. Under phosphorylating conditions, NS1619-induced, iberiotoxin-sensitive uncoupling diverted energy from ATP synthesis during the phosphorylating respiration of the endothelial mitochondria. Immunological analysis with antibodies raised against proteins of the plasma membrane BKCa channel identified a pore-forming ?-subunit and an auxiliary ??-subunit of the channel in the endothelial mitochondrial inner membrane. In conclusion, we show for the first time that the inner mitochondrial membrane in human endothelial EA.hy926 cells contains a large-conductance calcium-dependent potassium channel with properties similar to those of the surface membrane BKCa channel.
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Putative Structural and Functional Coupling of the Mitochondrial BKCa Channel to the Respiratory Chain.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2013
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Potassium channels have been found in the inner mitochondrial membranes of various cells. These channels regulate the mitochondrial membrane potential, the matrix volume and respiration. The activation of these channels is cytoprotective. In our study, the single-channel activity of a large-conductance Ca(2+)-regulated potassium channel (mitoBKCa channel) was measured by patch-clamping mitoplasts isolated from the human astrocytoma (glioblastoma) U-87 MG cell line. A potassium-selective current was recorded with a mean conductance of 290 pS in symmetrical 150 mM KCl solution. The channel was activated by Ca(2+) at micromolar concentrations and by the potassium channel opener NS1619. The channel was inhibited by paxilline and iberiotoxin, known inhibitors of BKCa channels. Western blot analysis, immuno-gold electron microscopy, high-resolution immunofluorescence assays and polymerase chain reaction demonstrated the presence of the BKCa channel ?4 subunit in the inner mitochondrial membrane of the human astrocytoma cells. We showed that substrates of the respiratory chain, such as NADH, succinate, and glutamate/malate, decrease the activity of the channel at positive voltages. This effect was abolished by rotenone, antimycin and cyanide, inhibitors of the respiratory chain. The putative interaction of the ?4 subunit of mitoBKCa with cytochrome c oxidase was demonstrated using blue native electrophoresis. Our findings indicate possible structural and functional coupling of the mitoBKCa channel with the mitochondrial respiratory chain in human astrocytoma U-87 MG cells.
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Identification of a voltage-gated potassium channel in gerbil hippocampal mitochondria.
Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun.
PUBLISHED: 05-31-2010
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Transient cerebral ischemia is known to induce endogenous mechanisms that can prevent or delay neuronal injury, such as the activation of mitochondrial potassium channels. However, the molecular mechanism of this effect remains unclear. In this study, the single-channel activity was measured using the patch-clamp technique of the mitoplasts isolated from gerbil hippocampus. In 70% of all patches, a potassium-selective current with the properties of a voltage-gated Kv-type potassium channel was recorded with mean conductance 109+/-6pS in a symmetrical solution. The channel was blocked at negative voltages and irreversibly by margatoxin, a specific Kv1.3 channel inhibitor. The ATP/Mg(2+) complex and Ca(2+) ions had no effect on channel activity. Additionally, agitoxin-2, a potent inhibitor of voltage-gated potassium channels, had no effect on mitochondrial channel activity. This observation suggests that in contrast to surface membrane channels, the mitochondrial voltage-gated potassium channel could have a different molecular structure with no affinity to agitoxin-2. Western blots of gerbil hippocampal mitochondria and immunohistochemistry on gerbil brain sections confirmed the expression of the Kv1.3 protein in mitochondria. Our findings indicate that gerbil brain mitochondria contain a voltage-gated potassium channel that can influence the function of mitochondria in physiological and pathological conditions and that has properties similar to the surface membrane Kv1.3 channel.
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Methadone induces necrotic-like cell death in SH-SY5Y cells by an impairment of mitochondrial ATP synthesis.
Biochim. Biophys. Acta
PUBLISHED: 04-27-2010
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Methadone is a widely used therapeutic opioid in narcotic addiction and neuropathic pain syndromes. Oncologists regularly use methadone as a long-lasting analgesic. Recently it has also been proposed as a promising agent in leukemia therapy, especially when conventional therapies are not effective. Nevertheless, numerous reports indicate a negative impact on human cognition with chronic exposure to opiates. Thus, clarification of methadone toxicity is required. In SH-SY5Y cells we found that high concentrations of methadone were required to induce cell death. Methadone-induced cell death seems to be related to necrotic processes rather than typical apoptosis. Cell cultures challenged with methadone presented alterations in mitochondrial outer membrane permeability. A mechanism that involves Bax translocation to the mitochondria was observed, accompanied with cytochrome c release. Furthermore, no participation of known protein regulators of apoptosis such as Bcl-X(L) and p53 was observed. Interestingly, methadone-induced cell death took place by a caspases-independent pathway; perhaps due to its ability to induce a drastic depletion in cellular ATP levels. Therefore, we studied the effect of methadone on isolated rat liver mitochondria. We observed that methadone caused mitochondrial uncoupling, coinciding with the ionophoric properties of methadone, but did not cause swelling of the organelles. Overall, the effects observed for cells in the presence of supratherapeutic doses of methadone may result from a "bioenergetic crisis." A decreased level of cellular energy may predispose cells to necrotic-like cell death.
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Pharmacology of mitochondrial potassium channels: dark side of the field.
FEBS Lett.
PUBLISHED: 01-12-2010
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Mitochondrial potassium channels play an important role in cytoprotection. Potassium channels in the inner mitochondrial membrane are modulated by inhibitors and activators (potassium channel openers) previously described for plasma membrane potassium channels. The majority of mitochondrial potassium channel modulators exhibit a broad spectrum of off-target effects. These include uncoupling properties, inhibition of the respiratory chain and effects on cellular calcium homeostasis. Therefore, the rational application of channel inhibitors or activators is crucial to understanding the cellular consequences of mitochondrial channel inhibition or activation. Moreover, understanding their side-effects should facilitate the design of a specific mitochondrial channel opener with cytoprotective properties. In this review, we discuss the complex interactions of potassium channel inhibitors and activators with cellular structures.
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Potassium channels in brain mitochondria.
Acta Biochim. Pol.
PUBLISHED: 06-20-2009
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Potassium channels are the most widely distributed class of ion channels. These channels are transmembrane proteins known to play important roles in both normal and pathophysiological functions in all cell types. Various potassium channels are recognised as potential therapeutic targets in the treatment of Parkinsons disease, Alzheimers disease, brain/spinal cord ischaemia and sepsis. In addition to their importance as therapeutic targets, certain potassium channels are known for their beneficial roles in anaesthesia, cardioprotection and neuroprotection. Some types of potassium channels present in the plasma membrane of various cells have been found in the inner mitochondrial membrane as well. Potassium channels have been proposed to regulate mitochondrial membrane potential, respiration, matrix volume and Ca(+) ion homeostasis. It has been proposed that mitochondrial potassium channels mediate ischaemic preconditioning in various tissues. However, the specificity of a pharmacological agents and the mechanisms underlying their effects on ischaemic preconditioning remain controversial. The following potassium channels from various tissues have been identified in the inner mitochondrial membrane: ATP-regulated (mitoK(ATP)) channel, large conductance Ca(2+)-regulated (mitoBK(Ca)) channel, intermediate conductance Ca(2+)-regulated (mitoIK(Ca)) channel, voltage-gated (mitoKv1.3 type) channel, and twin-pore domain (mitoTASK-3) channel. It has been shown that increased potassium flux into brain mitochondria induced by either the mitoK(ATP) channel or mitoBK(Ca) channel affects the beneficial effects on neuronal cell survival under pathological conditions. Recently, differential distribution of mitoBK(Ca) channels has been observed in neuronal mitochondria. These findings may suggest a neuroprotective role for the mitoBK(Ca) channel in specific brain structures. This minireview summarises current data on brain mitochondrial potassium channels and the efforts to identify their molecular correlates.
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Single channel studies of the ATP-regulated potassium channel in brain mitochondria.
J. Bioenerg. Biomembr.
PUBLISHED: 06-15-2009
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Mitochondrial potassium channels in the brain have been suggested to have an important role in neuroprotection. The single channel activity of mitochondrial potassium channels was measured after reconstitution of the purified inner membrane from rat brain mitochondria into a planar lipid bilayer. In addition to a large conductance potassium channel that was described previously, we identified a potassium channel that has a mean conductance of 219 +/- 15 pS. The activity of this channel was inhibited by ATP/Mg(2+) and activated by the potassium channel opener BMS191095. Channel activity was not influenced either by 5-hydroxydecanoic acid, an inhibitor of mitochondrial ATP-regulated potassium channels, or by the plasma membrane ATP-regulated potassium channel blocker HMR1098. Likewise, this mitochondrial potassium channel was unaffected by the large conductance potassium channel inhibitor iberiotoxin or by the voltage-dependent potassium channel inhibitor margatoxin. The amplitude of the conductance was lowered by magnesium ions, but the opening ability was unaffected. Immunological studies identified the Kir6.1 channel subunit in the inner membrane from rat brain mitochondria. Taken together, our results demonstrate for the first time the single channel activity and properties of an ATP-regulated potassium channel from rat brain mitochondria.
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Calcium ions regulate K? uptake into brain mitochondria: the evidence for a novel potassium channel.
Int J Mol Sci
PUBLISHED: 02-18-2009
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The mitochondrial response to changes of cytosolic calcium concentration has a strong impact on neuronal cell metabolism and viability. We observed that Ca(2+) additions to isolated rat brain mitochondria induced in potassium ion containing media a mitochondrial membrane potential depolarization and an accompanying increase of mitochondrial respiration. These Ca(2+) effects can be blocked by iberiotoxin and charybdotoxin, well known inhibitors of large conductance potassium channel (BK(Ca) channel). Furthermore, NS1619 - a BK(Ca) channel opener - induced potassium ion-specific effects on brain mitochondria similar to those induced by Ca(2+). These findings suggest the presence of a calcium-activated, large conductance potassium channel (sensitive to charybdotoxin and NS1619), which was confirmed by reconstitution of the mitochondrial inner membrane into planar lipid bilayers. The conductance of the reconstituted channel was 265 pS under gradient (50/450 mM KCl) conditions. Its reversal potential was equal to 50 mV, which proved that the examined channel was cation-selective. We also observed immunoreactivity of anti-beta(4) subunit (of the BK(Ca) channel) antibodies with ~26 kDa proteins of rat brain mitochondria. Immunohistochemical analysis confirmed the predominant occurrence of beta(4) subunit in neuronal mitochondria. We hypothesize that the mitochondrial BK(Ca) channel represents a calcium sensor, which can contribute to neuronal signal transduction and survival.
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