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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Carbohydrate intake in the etiology of Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis.
Inflamm. Bowel Dis.
PUBLISHED: 09-30-2014
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Diet may have a role in the etiology of inflammatory bowel disease. In previous studies, the associations between increased intakes of carbohydrates, sugar, starch, and inflammatory bowel disease are inconsistent. However, few prospective studies have investigated the associations between these macronutrients and incident Crohn's disease (CD) or ulcerative colitis (UC).
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THAOS: gastrointestinal manifestations of transthyretin amyloidosis - common complications of a rare disease.
Orphanet J Rare Dis
PUBLISHED: 04-17-2014
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Transthyretin amyloidosis is a systemic disorder caused by amyloid deposits formed by misfolded transthyretin monomers. Two main forms exist: hereditary and wild-type transthyretin amyloidosis, the former associated with transthyretin gene mutations. There are several disease manifestations; however, gastrointestinal complications are common in the hereditary form. The aim of this study was to explore the prevalence and distribution of gastrointestinal manifestations in transthyretin amyloidosis and to evaluate their impact on the patients' nutritional status and health-related quality of life (HRQoL).
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Loss-of-function of the voltage-gated sodium channel NaV1.5 (channelopathies) in patients with irritable bowel syndrome.
Gastroenterology
PUBLISHED: 02-06-2014
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SCN5A encodes the ?-subunit of the voltage-gated sodium channel NaV1.5. Many patients with cardiac arrhythmias caused by mutations in SCN5A also have symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). We investigated whether patients with IBS have SCN5A variants that affect the function of NaV1.5.
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Relative hypo- and hypercortisolism are both associated with depression and lower quality of life in bipolar disorder: a cross-sectional study.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2014
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Depression in unipolar and bipolar disorders is associated with hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal-axis (HPA-axis) hyperactivity. Also, unipolar disorder has recently been shown to exhibit HPA-axis hypoactivity. We studied for the first time how HPA-axis hypo- and hyperactivity relate to depression and disease burden in bipolar disorder. We were interested in studying hypocortisolism; characterized by increased HPA-axis negative feedback sensitivity and lower basal cortisol levels together with the opposite HPA-axis regulatory pattern of hypercortisolism.
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Immunochemical faecal occult blood tests in primary care and the risk of delay in the diagnosis of colorectal cancer.
Scand J Prim Health Care
PUBLISHED: 11-06-2013
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Abstract Objective. To evaluate the value, risks, and shortcomings of immunochemical faecal occult blood tests (iFOBTs) in the diagnosis of colorectal cancer (CRC) and adenomas with high-grade dysplasia (HGD) in patients initially presenting to primary care. Design. A retrospective population-based study. Setting and subjects. All 495 cases of CRC and adenomas with HGD diagnosed in the county of Jämtland, Sweden from 2005 to 2009. Results. Of 495 patients 323 (65%) initially presented to primary care. IFOBTs were performed in 215 of 323 (67%) patients. The sensitivity of iFOBT for CRC and adenomas with HGD was 88% (83% when patients with a history of rectal bleeding were excluded). Of 34 patients with anaemia found en passant, 10 had negative iFOBTs. Time to diagnosis was longer for patients with negative iFOBTs (p < 0.0005). Conclusion. IFOBT might be helpful in selecting which patients to refer for colonoscopy. However, iFOBT has a limited sensitivity as a diagnostic test for CRC and adenomas with HGD. Relying only on iFOBT for colonoscopy referral could delay diagnosis, especially for patients with anaemia found en passant.
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Genetic variants in CDC42 and NXPH1 as susceptibility factors for constipation and diarrhoea predominant irritable bowel syndrome.
Gut
PUBLISHED: 09-16-2013
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The complex genetic aetiology underlying irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) needs to be assessed in large-scale genetic studies. Two independent IBS cohorts were genotyped to assess whether genetic variability in immune, neuronal and barrier integrity genes is associated with IBS.
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Loss of gastric interstitial cells of Cajal in patients with hereditary transthyretin amyloidosis.
Amyloid
PUBLISHED: 05-03-2013
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Hereditary transthyretin (TTR) amyloidosis is a systemic neuropathic disorder caused by TTR gene mutations. Gastrointestinal complications are common and the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. The interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) function as pacemaker cells in the gastrointestinal tract and are important for gastrointestinal motility. The aim of this study was to investigate the densities of gastric ICC and nerves in patients with TTR amyloidosis compared to non-amyloidosis controls.
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Body mass index and the risk for Crohns disease and ulcerative colitis: data from a European Prospective Cohort Study (The IBD in EPIC Study).
Am. J. Gastroenterol.
PUBLISHED: 01-15-2013
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Obesity is associated with a proinflammatory state that may be involved in the etiology of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), for which there are plausible biological mechanisms. Our aim was to perform the first prospective cohort study investigating if there is an association between obesity and the development of incident IBD.
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Association of TNFSF15 polymorphism with irritable bowel syndrome.
Gut
PUBLISHED: 06-02-2011
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Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is the most common gastrointestinal disorder, affecting more than 10% of the general population worldwide. Although a genetic component is suspected, unambiguous susceptibility genes have so far not been identified. This study tested the hypothesis that genes contributing to epithelial barrier integrity, control of mucosal immune responses and interactions with bacteria in the gut are associated with IBS.
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The relationship between the val158met catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) polymorphism and irritable bowel syndrome.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 02-22-2011
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The catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) enzyme has a key function in the degradation of catecholamines and a functional polymorphism is val158met. The val/val genotype results in a three to fourfold higher enzymatic activity compared with the met/met genotype, with the val/met genotype exhibiting intermediate activity. Since pain syndromes as well as anxiety and depression are associated to low and high COMT activity respectively and these conditions are all associated with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) we wanted for the first time to explore the relationship between the polymorphism and IBS.
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Function and dysfunction of the colon and anorectum in adults: working team report of the Swedish Motility Group (SMoG).
Scand. J. Gastroenterol.
PUBLISHED: 02-05-2009
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Symptoms of fecal incontinence and constipation are common in the general population. These can, however, be unreliably reported and are poorly discriminatory for underlying pathophysiology. Furthermore, both symptoms may coexist. In the elderly, fecal impaction always must be excluded. For patients with constipation, colon transit studies, anorectal manometry and defecography may help to identify patients with slow-transit constipation and/or pelvic floor dysfunction. The best documented medical treatments for constipation are the macrogols, lactulose and isphagula. Evolving drugs include lubiprostone, which enhances colonic secretion by activating chloride channels. Surgery is restricted for a highly selected group of patients with severe slow-transit constipation and for those with large rectoceles that demonstrably cause rectal evacuatory impairment. For patients with fecal incontinence that does not resolve on antidiarrheal treatment, functional and structural evaluation with anorectal manometry and endoanal ultrasound or magnetic resonance (MR) of the anal canal may help to guide management. Sacral nerve stimulation is a rapidly evolving alternative when other treatments such as biofeedback and direct sphincter repair have failed. Advances in understanding the pathophysiology as a guide to treatment of patients with constipation and fecal incontinence is a continuing important goal for translational research. The content of this article is a summary of presentations given by the authors at the Fourth Meeting of the Swedish Motility Group, held in Gothenburg in April 2007.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.