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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Impact of an EHR-Based Diabetes Management Form on Quality and Outcomes of Diabetes Care in Primary Care Practices.
Am J Med Qual
PUBLISHED: 01-09-2014
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Health information technology shows promise for improving chronic disease care. This study assessed the impact of a diabetes management form (DMF), accessible within an electronic health record. From 2007 to 2009, 2108 diabetes patients were seen in 20 primary care practices; 1103 visits involved use of the DMF in 2008. The primary outcome was "optimal care": HbA1c ?8%, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol <100 mg/dL, blood pressure <130/80 mm Hg, not smoking, and aspirin prescription in patients ?40 years. After adjusting for number of visits, age, sex, and insulin use, DMF-exposed patients showed less improvement in attaining "optimal care" (estimated difference-in-difference [DID] = -2.06 percentage points; P < .001), LDL cholesterol (DID = -2.30; P = .023), blood pressure (DID = -3.05; P < .001), and total cholesterol (DID = -0.47; P = .004) targets. Documented microalbumin tests, aspirin prescription, and eye and foot exams increased more. Thus, DMF use was associated with smaller gains in achieving evidence-based targets, but greater improvement in documented delivery of care.
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Effects of naltrexone sustained- release/bupropion sustained-release combination therapy on body weight and glycemic parameters in overweight and obese patients with type 2 diabetes.
Diabetes Care
PUBLISHED: 10-21-2013
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OBJECTIVE To assess the efficacy and safety of 32 mg naltrexone sustained-release (SR)/360 mg bupropion SR (NB) in overweight/obese individuals with type 2 diabetes with or without background oral antidiabetes drugs. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS This was a 56-week, double-blind, placebo-controlled study in which 505 patients received standardized lifestyle intervention and were randomized 2:1 to NB or placebo. Coprimary end points were percent weight change and achievement of ?5% weight loss. Secondary end points included achievement of HbA1c <7% (53 mmol/mol), achievement of weight loss ?10%, and change in HbA1c, waist circumference, fasting blood glucose, and lipids. RESULTS In the modified intent-to-treat population (54% female, 80% Caucasian, and mean age 54 years, weight 106 kg, BMI 37 kg/m(2), and HbA1c 8.0% [64 mmol/mol]), NB resulted in significantly greater weight reduction (-5.0 vs. -1.8%; P < 0.001) and proportion of patients achieving ?5% weight loss (44.5 vs. 18.9%, P < 0.001) compared with placebo. NB also resulted in significantly greater HbA1c reduction (-0.6 vs. -0.1% [6.6 vs. 1.1 mmol/mol]; P < 0.001), percent of patients achieving HbA1c <7% (53 mmol/mol) (44.1 vs. 26.3%; P < 0.001), and improvement in triglycerides and HDL cholesterol compared with placebo. NB was associated with higher incidence of nausea (42.3 vs. 7.1%), constipation (17.7 vs. 7.1%), and vomiting (18.3 vs. 3.6%). No difference was observed between groups in the incidence of depression, suicidal ideation, or hypoglycemia. CONCLUSIONS NB therapy in overweight/obese patients with type 2 diabetes induced weight loss, which was associated with improvements in glycemic control and select cardiovascular risk factors and was generally well tolerated with a safety profile similar to that in patients without diabetes.
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Effects of taspoglutide on glycemic control and body weight in obese patients with type 2 diabetes (T-emerge 7 study).
Obesity (Silver Spring)
PUBLISHED: 02-14-2013
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Therapies that lower blood glucose and provide weight loss may provide meaningful benefits for obese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). This study assessed the efficacy of taspoglutide compared with placebo on glycemic control and weight in obese patients with T2DM inadequately controlled with metformin monotherapy.
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Efficacy and safety of insulin degludec in a flexible dosing regimen vs insulin glargine in patients with type 1 diabetes (BEGIN: Flex T1): a 26-week randomized, treat-to-target trial with a 26-week extension.
J. Clin. Endocrinol. Metab.
PUBLISHED: 02-07-2013
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This study investigated the efficacy and safety of insulin degludec (IDeg) once daily (OD), varying injection timing day to day in subjects with type 1 diabetes.
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Safety and efficacy of saxagliptin added to thiazolidinedione over 76 weeks in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.
Diab Vasc Dis Res
PUBLISHED: 05-13-2011
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To assess the long-term efficacy and safety of saxagliptin in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus inadequately controlled with thiazolidinedione monotherapy, 565 patients were randomised to saxagliptin (2.5 mg or 5 mg) or placebo added to thiazolidinedione over 76 weeks (24-week short-term + 52-week long-term extension period) in this phase 3, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial; 360 patients completed the study. At 76 weeks, adjusted mean changes from baseline HbA(1C) (repeated measures model; 95% CI) for saxagliptin 2.5 mg, 5 mg, and placebo were -0.59% (-0.75, -0.43), -1.09% (-1.26, -0.93), and -0.20% (-0.39, -0.01), respectively (post hoc and nominal p=0.0019 and p<0.0001 for saxagliptin 2.5 mg and 5 mg vs. placebo, respectively). Adverse event frequency was similar between groups. Confirmed hypoglycaemic events were 1.0% and 0% vs. 0.5% for saxagliptin 2.5 mg and 5 mg vs. placebo, respectively. Results should be interpreted with caution given the proportion of patients who discontinued or required glycaemic rescue therapy during the 76-week course of study. Saxagliptin added to thiazolidinedione provided sustained incremental efficacy vs. placebo with little hypoglycaemia for up to 76 weeks and was generally well tolerated.
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Efficacy and safety of CP-945,598, a selective cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonist, on weight loss and maintenance.
Obesity (Silver Spring)
PUBLISHED: 02-03-2011
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Three double-blind, placebo-controlled, three-parallel-group, multicenter phase 3 trials were conducted to assess the efficacy and safety of CP-945,598 for weight loss and weight-loss maintenance. Two trials were designed to be 2 years in duration (in obese and overweight patients) and one as a 1-year study (in obese and overweight patients with type 2 diabetes). However, the 2-year trials and the CP-945,598 development program were terminated before completion due to changing regulatory perspectives of CB1 receptor-related drugs. In total, 1,253 and 2,536 participants in the two 2-year multinational and North American studies were randomized to 10-mg CP-945,598 (n = 360; 718); 20-mg CP-945,598 (n = 534, 1,084) and placebo (n = 359, 734), respectively; and 975 participants were randomized to 10-mg CP-945,598 (n = 318); 20-mg CP-945,598 (n = 320); and placebo (n = 337) in the 1-year multinational diabetes trial. Baseline demographics were similar between treatment groups within each trial. One year of treatment with CP-945,598 resulted in a dose-related mean percentage reduction from baseline body-weight in all trials. A significant proportion of all participants also achieved 5% and 10% weight loss after 1 year. In participants with mainly well-controlled type 2 diabetes, the combination of lifestyle and CP-945,598 induced substantial improvements in glycemic control. The most frequent adverse events (AEs) for CP-945,598 were: diarrhea, nausea, nasopharyngitis, and headache. Self-reported experiences of anxiety and suicidal thoughts were higher with CP-945,598 than placebo, as were the incidence of depression and depressed mood. However, the reported increases in psychiatric symptoms were not consistently dose dependent.
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Type 2 diabetes comorbidities and treatment challenges: rationale for DPP-4 inhibitors.
Postgrad Med
PUBLISHED: 05-14-2010
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The management of type 2 diabetes is designed to reduce disease-related complications and improve long-term outcomes. Achieving glycemic control is a critical component of this process. The selection of drug therapy for reducing blood glucose is made more challenging when patients already have complications or comorbid conditions (eg, high risk for hypoglycemia, obesity, renal impairment). Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors are a new class of antihyperglycemic drugs that block degradation of incretin hormones. By enhancing and prolonging incretin effects, DPP-4 inhibitors stimulate glucose-dependent insulin secretion and also reduce glucagon secretion. This results in improved glycemic control, as reflected by decreases in glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), fasting plasma glucose, and postprandial plasma glucose. Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors also have the potential to improve beta-cell function. In randomized clinical trials, the DPP-4 inhibitors saxagliptin and sitagliptin reduced HbA1c by 0.5% to 0.8%, compared with placebo, whether used as monotherapy or in combination with another agent. As initial combination therapy with metformin, saxagliptin and sitagliptin have demonstrated reductions in HbA1c of 2.5% and 1.9%, respectively. The efficacy of the DPP-4 inhibitors was maintained during treatment for up to 2 years, and did not differ in the elderly compared with younger adults. Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors offer efficacy similar to other drug classes, and are well tolerated with a lower risk of hypoglycemia, weight-neutral effects, and a low propensity for drug-drug interactions. On the basis of their clinical profiles, the DPP-4 inhibitors are emerging as an attractive option for improving glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes. Saxagliptin and sitagliptin are approved for use as initial therapy in combination with metformin, as monotherapy, as well as in combination with metformin, a sulfonylurea, or a thiazolidinedione in patients not adequately controlled by these agents alone.
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Titration of inhaled human insulin (Exubera) in a treat-to-target regimen for patients with type 2 diabetes.
Diabetes Technol. Ther.
PUBLISHED: 02-16-2010
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This study assessed the feasibility of safely achieving target glycated hemoglobin (A1C) of < or =7% by intensifying structured insulin titration regimens using inhaled human insulin (Exubera [EXU] [Pfizer Inc., New York, NY] [insulin human (recombinant DNA origin)] inhalation powder) in patients with type 2 diabetes inadequately controlled on combination oral antidiabetes agents (OADs).
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Effect of rimonabant on glycemic control in insulin-treated type 2 diabetes: the ARPEGGIO trial.
Diabetes Care
PUBLISHED: 12-15-2009
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OBJECTIVE To examine the efficacy and safety of rimonabant, a selective cannabinoid receptor type-1 antagonist, in patients with type 2 diabetes receiving insulin monotherapy. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Patients (n = 368; A1C > or =7%) were randomized to 20 mg/day rimonabant or placebo in this 48-week, double-blind, placebo-controlled multicenter trial. Change in baseline A1C to week 48 (primary outcome) and changes in body weight, waist circumference, and lipid levels (secondary outcomes) were assessed. RESULTS Rimonabant significantly reduced baseline A1C versus placebo (-0.89 vs. -0.24%; P < 0.0001), and significantly greater improvements were observed in cardiometabolic risk factors. More rimonabant patients achieved >10% reduction in mean total daily insulin dose versus placebo (P = 0.0012), and fewer required rescue medication (P < 0.0001). Hypoglycemia, nausea, dizziness, anxiety, and depression were more frequent with rimonabant. CONCLUSIONS Rimonabant improved glycemic control and cardiometabolic risk factors in patients with type 2 diabetes receiving insulin.
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Safety and efficacy of inhaled human insulin (exubera) during discontinuation and readministration of therapy in adults with type 2 diabetes: a 3-year randomized controlled trial.
Diabetes Technol. Ther.
PUBLISHED: 11-13-2009
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This study assessed pulmonary safety following discontinuation and readministration of inhaled human insulin {Exubera [EXU] [Pfizer Inc., New York, NY] (insulin human [recombinant DNA origin]) inhalation powder} in adults with type 2 diabetes (T2DM).
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Saxagliptin added to a thiazolidinedione improves glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes and inadequate control on thiazolidinedione alone.
J. Clin. Endocrinol. Metab.
PUBLISHED: 10-28-2009
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Due to the natural progression of type 2 diabetes (T2D), most patients require combination therapy to maintain glycemic control.
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Controversies in prediabetes: do we have a diagnosis?
Postgrad Med
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It is estimated that more than one-third of US adults exhibit intermediate glycemic control, termed "prediabetes" or "impaired glucose regulation," and many individuals with prediabetes or diabetes are unaware of their glycemic state. Prediabetes confers significant risks for developing type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and cardiovascular comorbidities. Early lifestyle intervention and pharmacotherapy have demonstrated success in preventing or delaying onset of T2DM. Thus, early screening and diagnosis of prediabetes, along with subsequent recommendations on preventative measures, are vital in preventing or delaying progression to T2DM. However, a consensus among organizations on the diagnostic criteria defining prediabetes has not been reached, complicating the screening and diagnostic process and resulting in varying subpopulations of patients diagnosed with prediabetes. In this article, the guidelines issued by several organizations are reviewed, as well as recent studies analyzing the predictive value of various diagnostic criteria for the progression to T2DM. Recent trials investigating the effects of lifestyle modification and/or pharmacotherapy on the prevention or delay of development of T2DM have suggested some complex outcomes that require further clarification, but offer some hope for the future. These results, and the varying guidelines for the diagnosis of prediabetes, suggest a need for informed scientific debate on diagnostic criteria and recommendations for preventive care of prediabetic states.
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Insulin degludec, an ultra-longacting basal insulin, versus insulin glargine in basal-bolus treatment with mealtime insulin aspart in type 2 diabetes (BEGIN Basal-Bolus Type 2): a phase 3, randomised, open-label, treat-to-target non-inferiority trial.
Lancet
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Basal insulin therapy does not stop loss of ?-cell function, which is the hallmark of type 2 diabetes mellitus, and thus diabetes control inevitably deteriorates. Insulin degludec is a new, ultra-longacting basal insulin. We aimed to assess efficacy and safety of insulin degludec compared with insulin glargine in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.
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Insulin detemir for the treatment of obese patients with type 2 diabetes.
Diabetes Metab Syndr Obes
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The risk for developing type 2 diabetes (T2DM) is greater among obese individuals. Following onset of the disease, patients with T2DM become more likely to be afflicted with diabetic micro- and macrovascular complications. Decreasing body weight has been shown to lower glycosylated hemoglobin and improve other metabolic parameters in patients with T2DM. Medications used to lower blood glucose may increase body weight in patients with T2DM and this has been repeatedly shown to be the case for conventional, human insulin formulations. Insulin detemir is a neutral, soluble, long-acting insulin analog in which threonine-30 of the insulin B-chain is deleted, and the C-terminal lysine is acetylated with myristic acid, a C14 fatty acid chain. Insulin detemir binds to albumin, a property that enhances its pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic profile. Results from clinical trials have demonstrated that treatment with insulin detemir is associated with less weight gain than either insulin glargine or neutral protamine Hagedorn insulin. There are many potential reasons for the lower weight gain observed among patients treated with insulin detemir, including lower risk for hypoglycemia and therefore decreased defensive eating due to concern about this adverse event, along with other effects that may be related to the albumin binding of this insulin that may account for lower within-patient variability and consistent action. These might include faster transport across the blood-brain barrier, induction of satiety signaling in the brain, and preferential inhibition of hepatic glucose production versus peripheral glucose uptake. Experiments in diabetic rats have also indicated that insulin detemir increases adiponectin levels, which is associated with both weight loss and decreased eating.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.