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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
A novel, molecularly imprinted polymer sensor made using an oligomeric methyl silsesquioxane-TiO2 composite sol on a glassy carbon electrode for the detection of procainamide hydrochloride.
Biosens Bioelectron
PUBLISHED: 05-29-2014
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In this study, we designed a novel molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP), oligomeric methyl silsesquioxane (O-MSSQ)-TiO2 composite sol, which was made using a sol-gel reaction. This polymer has structural rigidity and high surface area of O-MSSQ, as well as high bio-compatibility and relatively good conductivity of the TiO2. Next, a sensitive and selective imprinted electrochemical sensor was successfully constructed for the direct detection of procainamide hydrochloride by molecularly imprinting a film onto the surface of a glassy carbon electrode. Adding TiO2 resulted in a noticeable enhancement in the sensitivity of the MIP sensor. The performance of the O-MSSQ-TiO2 film was discussed, and the optimal conditions for detection were determined. The oxidative peak current increased linearly with the concentration of procainamide hydrochloride in the range of 4.00×10(-9)-4.97×10(-5)M using differential pulse voltammetry, and the detection limit was 1.30×10(-9)M with S/N=3. Furthermore, the sensor was applied to determine the procainamide hydrochloride content in a human blood serum sample. The recoveries of the sensors varied from 96.77% to 101.35%, indicating that the prepared sensor might be promising for the determination of procainamide hydrochloride in clinical tests. Moreover, the imprinted electrochemical sensor was used to selectively detect procainamide hydrochloride. The analytical application was conducted successfully and yielded accurate and precise results.
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Preparation of raspberry-like polymer/silica nanocomposite microspheres via emulsifier-free polymerization in water/acetone media.
J Colloid Interface Sci
PUBLISHED: 03-31-2009
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Raspberry-like polymer/silica nanocomposite microspheres were prepared by emulsifier-free copolymerization of styrene (St) with butyl acrylate (BA) in the presence of 20 nm silica nanoparticles in water/acetone media. A cationic monomer, 2-(methacryloyl)ethyltrimethylammonium chloride (MTC), was used as comonomer and nanosilica particles were adsorbed onto the growing latex core via the electrostatic interaction between negatively charged silica particles and positively charged polymer particles. The average particle sizes and the final silica contents of the nanocomposite microspheres ranged from 200 to 500 nm and 20 to 40 wt%, respectively, depending on the reaction conditions. The solid content of the obtained dispersions could be adjusted between 10 and 25 wt%. The influence of some synthetic parameters, for instance, the ratio of acetone/water, initial silica amount, the mass ratio of the St/BA, MTC, and the APS concentration on the polymerization stability, the average particle size, silica content, and morphology of the composite microspheres, were studied here in detail. It was found that the addition of acetone to the continuous phase resulted in smaller particle sizes and for the lower dielectric medium electrostatic repulsion becomes larger; hence coagulative nucleation is reduced compared to that in aqueous media.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.