JoVE Visualize What is visualize?
Stop Reading. Start Watching.
Advanced Search
Stop Reading. Start Watching.
Regular Search
Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Protein Hit1, a novel box C/D snoRNP assembly factor, controls cellular concentration of the scaffolding protein Rsa1 by direct interaction.
Nucleic Acids Res.
PUBLISHED: 08-28-2014
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Biogenesis of eukaryotic box C/D small nucleolar ribonucleoprotein particles (C/D snoRNPs) involves conserved trans-acting factors, which are proposed to facilitate the assembly of the core proteins Snu13p/15.5K, Nop58p/NOP58, Nop56p/NOP56 and Nop1p/Fibrillarin on box C/D small nucleolar RNAs (C/D snoRNAs). In yeast, protein Rsa1 acts as a platform, interacting with both the RNA-binding core protein Snu13 and protein Pih1 of the Hsp82-R2TP chaperone complex. In this work, a proteomic approach coupled with functional and structural studies identifies protein Hit1 as a novel Rsa1p-interacting partner involved in C/D snoRNP assembly. Hit1p contributes to in vivo C/D snoRNA stability and pre-RNA maturation kinetics. It associates with U3 snoRNA precursors and influences its 3'-end processing. Remarkably, Hit1p is required to maintain steady-state levels of Rsa1p. This stabilizing activity is likely to be general across eukaryotic species, as the human protein ZNHIT3(TRIP3) showing sequence homology with Hit1p regulates the abundance of NUFIP1, the Rsa1p functional homolog. The nuclear magnetic resonance solution structure of the Rsa1p317-352-Hit1p70-164 complex reveals a novel mode of protein-protein association explaining the strong stability of the Rsa1p-Hit1p complex. Our biochemical data show that C/D snoRNAs and the core protein Nop58 can interact with the purified Snu13p-Rsa1p-Hit1p heterotrimer.
Related JoVE Video
The C-terminal domain from S. cerevisiae Pat1 displays two conserved regions involved in decapping factor recruitment.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2014
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Eukaryotic mRNA decay is a highly regulated process allowing cells to rapidly modulate protein production in response to internal and environmental cues. Mature translatable eukaryotic mRNAs are protected from fast and uncontrolled degradation in the cytoplasm by two cis-acting stability determinants: a methylguanosine (m(7)G) cap and a poly(A) tail at their 5' and 3' extremities, respectively. The hydrolysis of the m(7)G cap structure, known as decapping, is performed by the complex composed of the Dcp2 catalytic subunit and its partner Dcp1. The Dcp1-Dcp2 decapping complex has a low intrinsic activity and requires accessory factors to be fully active. Among these factors, Pat1 is considered to be a central scaffolding protein involved in Dcp2 activation but also in inhibition of translation initiation. Here, we present the structural and functional study of the C-terminal domain from S. cerevisiae Pat1 protein. We have identified two conserved and functionally important regions located at both extremities of the domain. The first region is involved in binding to Lsm1-7 complex. The second patch is specific for fungal proteins and is responsible for Pat1 interaction with Edc3. These observations support the plasticity of the protein interaction network involved in mRNA decay and show that evolution has extended the C-terminal alpha-helical domain from fungal Pat1 proteins to generate a new binding platform for protein partners.
Related JoVE Video
Characterization of the interaction between protein Snu13p/15.5K and the Rsa1p/NUFIP factor and demonstration of its functional importance for snoRNP assembly.
Nucleic Acids Res.
PUBLISHED: 11-13-2013
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
The yeast Snu13p protein and its 15.5K human homolog both bind U4 snRNA and box C/D snoRNAs. They also bind the Rsa1p/NUFIP assembly factor, proposed to scaffold immature snoRNPs and to recruit the Hsp90-R2TP chaperone complex. However, the nature of the Snu13p/15.5K-Rsa1p/NUFIP interaction and its exact role in snoRNP assembly remained to be elucidated. By using biophysical, molecular and imaging approaches, here, we identify residues needed for Snu13p/15.5K-Rsa1p/NUFIP interaction. By NMR structure determination and docking approaches, we built a 3D model of the Snup13p-Rsa1p interface, suggesting that residues R249, R246 and K250 in Rsa1p and E72 and D73 in Snu13p form a network of electrostatic interactions shielded from the solvent by hydrophobic residues from both proteins and that residue W253 of Rsa1p is inserted in a hydrophobic cavity of Snu13p. Individual mutations of residues in yeast demonstrate the functional importance of the predicted interactions for both cell growth and snoRNP formation. Using archaeal box C/D sRNP 3D structures as templates, the association of Snu13p with Rsa1p is predicted to be exclusive of interactions in active snoRNPs. Rsa1p and NUFIP may thus prevent premature activity of pre-snoRNPs, and their removal may be a key step for active snoRNP production.
Related JoVE Video
Identification of the Rps28 binding motif from yeast Edc3 involved in the autoregulatory feedback loop controlling RPS28B mRNA decay.
Nucleic Acids Res.
PUBLISHED: 08-16-2013
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the Edc3 protein was previously reported to participate in the auto-regulatory feedback loop controlling the level of the RPS28B messenger RNA (mRNA). We show here that Edc3 binds directly and tightly to the globular core of Rps28 ribosomal protein. This binding occurs through a motif that is present exclusively in Edc3 proteins from yeast belonging to the Saccharomycetaceae phylum. Functional analyses indicate that the ability of Edc3 to interact with Rps28 is not required for its general function and for its role in the regulation of the YRA1 pre-mRNA decay. In contrast, this interaction appears to be exclusively required for the auto-regulatory mechanism controlling the RPS28B mRNA decay. These observations suggest a plausible model for the evolutionary appearance of a Rps28 binding motif in Edc3.
Related JoVE Video
High-resolution structural analysis shows how Tah1 tethers Hsp90 to the R2TP complex.
Structure
PUBLISHED: 07-03-2013
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
The ubiquitous Hsp90 chaperone participates in snoRNP and RNA polymerase assembly through interaction with the R2TP complex. This complex includes the proteins Tah1, Pih1, Rvb1, and Rvb2. Tah1 bridges Hsp90 to R2TP. Its minimal TPR domain includes two TPR motifs and a capping helix. We established the high-resolution solution structures of Tah1 free and in complex with the Hsp90 C-terminal peptide. The TPR fold is similar in the free and bound forms and we show experimentally that in addition to its solvating/stabilizing role, the capping helix is essential for the recognition of the Hsp90 (704)EMEEVD(709) motif. In addition to Lys79 and Arg83 from the carboxylate clamp, this helix bears Tyr82 forming a ?/S-CH3 interaction with Hsp90 M(705) from the peptide 310 helix. The Tah1 C-terminal region is unfolded, and we demonstrate that it is essential for the recruitment of the Pih1 C-terminal domain and folds upon binding.
Related JoVE Video

What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.